Shortage of Foster Families Advanced General Psychology Amanda Thompson Argosy University
Goals of Foster Care <ul><li>Children in foster care homes have goals of finding adoptive homes. The children are placed i...
Feelings of Children <ul><li>There are so many children that are left without adoptive homes and never find a permanent ho...
Responsibilities <ul><li>Interviews were conducted with parents of foster and adoptive children, case managers, case worke...
Challenges of Foster Children <ul><li>The hypothesis will be that depending on the status of the children, the children th...
Priorities <ul><li>There is a shortage in foster parents due to the little money provided to care for the children. There ...
Requirements <ul><li>“ The term special needs describes a potential barrier to timely  adoptive  placement. In addition to...
The Impact  <ul><li>This topic is important to me because as a child my mother raised foster children and I know the impac...
Ratings <ul><li>“ Recent studies also examine intact families who have adopted  children  with handicaps. Nelson [1985] fo...
References: <ul><li>Baring-Gould, M., Essick, D., Kleinkauf, C., & Miller, M., (1983). Why do foster homes  close?  Arete ...
References Continued: <ul><li>Rhodes, K. W., Orme, J. G., & Buehler, C. (2001). A comparison of family foster parents  who...
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Shortage of foster families slideshow

  1. 1. Shortage of Foster Families Advanced General Psychology Amanda Thompson Argosy University
  2. 2. Goals of Foster Care <ul><li>Children in foster care homes have goals of finding adoptive homes. The children are placed in these homes until willing and wanting families open their homes to being parents to the children. This takes individuals who are patient, kind, loving, and attentive to make the decision of becoming an adoptive parent. The qualitative method is the method that I saw best for conducting this research. The children are sometimes placed in multiple homes while in foster care. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Children in the foster care system are in their in hopes of finding a permanent home, so that they can find stability and love again. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Feelings of Children <ul><li>There are so many children that are left without adoptive homes and never find a permanent home outside of their foster homes. Some of the results reported that over 70% of families are satisfied with the outcomes of recent adoptions. Over 60% of the mothers reported that they have become better individuals after this commitment and the only problem stated is that the money should be more. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Children who never find a permanent home are left with feelings of loneliness, lost, and unwanted. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Responsibilities <ul><li>Interviews were conducted with parents of foster and adoptive children, case managers, case workers, and the children. Over the last two decades there has been an increase of children with disabilities needing to find permanent homes. The children with disabilities required more money than the children without disabilities due to their many needs. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: The families feel that the pay that is given to them is not enough to care for the children. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Challenges of Foster Children <ul><li>The hypothesis will be that depending on the status of the children, the children that have disabilities are the ones that are the most challenging to find a adoptive family due to the cost and patience with the care that is required. I visited the adoption website and the only the children that were on the site had disabilities , some more than one and the rest are older, mostly boys. There were no babies at all on the site. (www.adopt info.org) I think that it is so sad that these children have to be picked and chosen over. These children are not given a fair chance at all and mostly because of the financial issues. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: It should not matter the status of a child, they all should be treated as equal. Not everyone is perfect. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Priorities <ul><li>There is a shortage in foster parents due to the little money provided to care for the children. There is a problem in the government that limit’s the amount of funding that is issued to parents that want to provide a temporary home for children in need. There are too many children that need a home so that they can feel safe, secure, and loved. Children are not asked to be born or to be put in these situations. This is out of their control, and children are the future and without the proper guidance and needs met, they will not be able to reach their full potential. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Children should be a priority to everyone. </li></ul>
  7. 7. Requirements <ul><li>“ The term special needs describes a potential barrier to timely adoptive placement. In addition to physical and mental impairments and medical problems, other commonly used criteria in the designation of special needs are older age, minority or biracial background, adoption as part of a sibling group, and serious behavioral problems. The increase in special-needs adoption over the past two decades is consistent with the tenets of permanency planning. As codified in the Adoption Assistance and Child Welfare Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-272), permanency planning emphasizes the right of children to live in nurturing family settings that offer the opportunity for lifetime relationships [Maluccio and Fein 1983].” </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Special needs children require more care than other children, and their growth and development should be addressed with patience. </li></ul>
  8. 8. The Impact <ul><li>This topic is important to me because as a child my mother raised foster children and I know the impact it have on the children. The children have a hard enough time dealing with the issue of finding a family and issues of why they had to leave their previous homes. These children are put through so much pain and have even had horrible things happen to them or witness something horrible. This is a problem that needs to be solved, in recent years the statistics show that the number of families to foster children have declined due to something that needs to examined closely and taken seriously. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: The children are in need of homes, and everything should be done to provide them with a home. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Ratings <ul><li>“ Recent studies also examine intact families who have adopted children with handicaps. Nelson [1985] found that 73% of 177 families that adopted special-needs children were well satisfied with the adoption. Given that intellectual and physical impairments were not mentioned as significant predictors of parental satisfaction, it follows that the level of satisfaction among parents who adopted children with these conditions was comparable to that in the sample as a whole. Franklin and Masserick [1969a, 1969b, 1969c] studied adoptions of 314 children with medical conditions and found that these conditions caused less restriction of family activities than had been expected. </li></ul><ul><li>Notes: Ratings of parental role satisfaction were good or excellent in 77% of the adoptions. </li></ul>
  10. 10. References: <ul><li>Baring-Gould, M., Essick, D., Kleinkauf, C., & Miller, M., (1983). Why do foster homes close? Arete 8(2), 49-63. </li></ul><ul><li>Baum A. C., Crase, S. J., & Crase, K.L. (2001). Influences on the decisions to become or not to become a foster parent. Families in Society, 82, 202-213. </li></ul><ul><li>Bureau of Labor Statistics. (2000). Standard occupational classifications. Retrieved from http:// stats.bls.gov/soc.soc_home.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Chamberlain, P., Moreland, S.. & Reid, K. (1992). Enhanced services and stipends for foster families; Effects on retention rates and outcomes for children. Child Welfare, 71, 387-401. </li></ul><ul><li>Fine, P. M., & Pape, M. (1991). Foster Families: The demands and rewards of being a foster mother. In J. Spurlock & C. Robinowitz (Eds.). Women’s progress: Promise and problems (pp. 35-58). New York. Pienum Press. </li></ul>
  11. 11. References Continued: <ul><li>Rhodes, K. W., Orme, J. G., & Buehler, C. (2001). A comparison of family foster parents who quit, consider quitting, and plan to continue fostering. Social Service Review , 75, 85-114. </li></ul><ul><li>Ryan, P. (1985). Analysis of foster parents who leave fostering. Impact, 1, 3. </li></ul><ul><li>Siegal, M. M., & Roberts, M. (1989). Recruiting foster parents for disabled children. Social Work, 34, 551-553. </li></ul><ul><li>Simms, M. D., & Horowitz, S. M. (1996). Foster homes environment: A preliminary report. Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 17, 170-175. </li></ul><ul><li>Soliday, E., McClusky- Fawcett., K., & Meck, N., (1994). Foster mother’s stress, coping, and social supports in parenting drug-exposed and other at-risk toddlers. Children’s Health Care , 23 (1), 15-32. </li></ul>

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