Poverty, class, and wealth power point

2,401 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,401
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
23
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Poverty, class, and wealth power point

  1. 1. CLASS<br />poverty<br />Wealth<br />
  2. 2. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Activity: <br /> With your group, arrange the pieces of the puzzle<br />DO YOU THINK THIS WAS GRADED FAIRLY<br />
  3. 3. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />“If the misery of the poor be caused not by the laws of nature, but by our institutions, great is our sin.” <br />Charles Darwin<br />
  4. 4. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #1: “Some Parents Just Don’t Care” by Doris Lightfoot<br />Main ideas:<br /><ul><li>Lower class parents often thought to be “empty vessels” and having little involvement in school
  5. 5. But what is “involvement”?</li></ul>“...most accounts of parental involvement” among low-income parents focus either on what the families lack or on what the schools can do to teach them...framing lower income parents as empty.” (Lightfoot, 2004)<br />
  6. 6. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #1: “Some Parents Just Don’t Care” by Doris Lightfoot<br />Main ideas:<br /><ul><li>Family literacy programs</li></ul>“...predicated on the idea that someone other than the parents....know better than the parents themselves how to raise and educate children.” (Lightfoot, 2004)<br />
  7. 7. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #1: “Some Parents Just Don’t Care” by Doris Lightfoot<br />Implications for teachers:<br /><ul><li>This can create an “ideal type” of parent based on social class
  8. 8. “in need of training” vs. “entitled to input”
  9. 9. Expectations of parents based on socioeconomic class
  10. 10. Middle class: full of resources, yet can be “too pushy”
  11. 11. Lower class: unable to provide for child, empty, uninvolved </li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #1: “Some Parents Just Don’t Care” by Doris Lightfoot<br />Implications for teachers:<br /><ul><li>Expectations of student abilities and success based on socioeconomic status
  12. 12. Difficult to see past the categories our society creates</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #1: “Some Parents Just Don’t Care” by Doris Lightfoot<br />Ideas in Development:<br /><ul><li>The language we use to categorize students and their families
  13. 13. How to recognize and prevent our bias
  14. 14. Overcoming the limits created by categorization
  15. 15. The “Pros” and “Cons” of programs designed for lower-class parents</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #2: “What No School Can Do”<br />by James Traub<br />1) Ghetto Children vs. Inner City Schools<br /> <br />2) The Historiography of Alleviating Poverty<br /> <br />3) "The American Myth" - Schools Solving Inequality<br />
  16. 16. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #2: “What No School Can Do”<br />by James Traub<br />4) Cognitive Gaps between Blacks and Whites<br /> <br />5) Human Capital vs. Social Capital<br /> <br />6) Retarding Black Progress (Gautreaux Chicago Experiment<br />
  17. 17. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #3: “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”<br />by Jean Anyon<br /><ul><li> The purpose of the article and the study which it summarized was to "illustrate differences in the classroom experience and curriculum knowledge among schools”.
  18. 18. - According to the author, the study suggests that there is a “hidden curriculum in school *work* that has a profound implication for theory- and practise- in education”. </li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #3: “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”<br />by Jean Anyon<br />Basic overview of various social classes (within the context of the article/study):<br /> - Working class <br /><ul><li> Middle class
  19. 19. - Capitalist </li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #3: “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”<br />by Jean Anyon<br />Within this understanding of social class, the study explores five different schools in New Jersey in/around a “medium-sized” city district.<br />- 2 "Working class" schools. Findings:<br />- 1 "Middle class" school. Findings:<br />- 1 "Affluent professional" school (upper-middle class).<br />Findings:<br />- 1 "Executive elite" school Findings: <br />
  20. 20. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #3: “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”<br />by Jean Anyon<br />How is this applicable? <br />The article demonstrates a real-world example of how schoolwork has been adapted to fit students of various socioeconomic status. For an educator to be mindful of the information presented in this article, it may encourage them to vary their lesson delivery- especially for the students in the schools of lower social classes (the working class and middle class schools particularly). <br />
  21. 21. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #3: “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work”<br />by Jean Anyon<br />How is this applicable? <br />In differentiating instructional methods for students of the schools of lower social class, an educator can make a profound difference in a student's learning experience and even allow students of lower social classes the opportunity to succeed and break the mould of “simple punctuation is all they'll ever use”.<br />
  22. 22. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Issue<br />- Misunderstanding amongst classes exists<br /><ul><li> Burden of misunderstanding falls on poor (natural </li></ul> because they occupy lowest rung)<br />- Class cluelessness is rampant in schools<br />
  23. 23. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Importance<br />class division between teachers and students<br />how to help students and how to connect with them (poor)<br />
  24. 24. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Solution: Expose the hidden rules of class (behavioural) <br />
  25. 25.
  26. 26. Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Purpose: Increase number of choices and facilitate informed choices (more options)<br />How: <br /><ul><li>Impossible to help poor students before one understands them and to understand them requires understanding hidden rules of poverty (ex: situational versus generational)
  27. 27. Explicitly teach poor students on hidden rules of the middle class</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Criticism<br /><ul><li>Perpetuating classism and racism (stereotypes?)
  28. 28. Neglects acknowledgement that American economy and American schools systematically discriminate against poor people
  29. 29. Martin Luther King Jr. quote</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Criticism<br /><ul><li>Paul Gorski emphasizes that Payne’s ideology focuses on “fixing” poor people rather than reforming classist policies and practices when dealing with poverty and education
  30. 30. Primary method of support/research is anecdote (academic criticism)
  31. 31. Bandage solution: What is the root of the problem?</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />Article #4: “The Class-Conscious Raiser”<br />by Paul Tough<br />Conclusion<br /><ul><li>interest is in teaching, helping, and connecting </li></ul> regardless of attack on theories<br /><ul><li> creating dialogue
  32. 32. awareness (especially for educators)</li></li></ul><li>Poverty, Class, and Wealth<br />QUESTIONS?<br />

×