V
W
AN INTERACTIVE FURNITURE PIECE
FOR OCD RECOVERY
CONTENTS
POPULATION RESEARCH
CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
	 Sketch exploration
	 Sketch evolution
	Concept
	 Design & Model
CONSTRU...
POPULATION
RESEARCH
OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER
FAST FACTS
Ranks in the top 10 of the most
disabling illnesses of any kind,
in terms of lost...
UNCOVEREDCASE STUDIES
“It’s a full time job for me to live.”
15-year-old fears her whole family is
contaminated and can’t ...
CONCEPT
DEVELOPMENT
SKETCH EXPLORATION
I began sketching with the idea of supporting the behaviors of people with OCD including touch avoidanc...
SKETCH EXPLORATION
D. Modular storage units
E. Modular storage F. Seating and storage
9
SKETCH EVOLUTION
“Those suffering from obsessions or compulsions want to know one thing and one thing only; how to stop
OC...
SKETCH EVOLUTION
D. Therapy seat has feared/contaminated person sit near patient, as patient
progresses in treatment they ...
CONCEPT
The basis of Exposure & Response Prevention Therapy is to have the person with
OCD directly confront their anxieti...
CONCEPT EXPLORATION
FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS
BEHAVIOR
Task may be too easy for 2 people to carry out, want them to
communicate ...
MATERIALS LIST
Maple plywood 3/4 in
Maple plywood 1/2 in
Maple plywood 1/4 in
Bungee cords 18 in
Wood glue
Nails
Screws fo...
MODEL
15
CONSTRUCTION
CUTTING
PIECES
18
ASSEMBLY
19
FINAL
PROTOTYPE
SIDEFRONT
22
BOTTOM & TOP SHELF
DETAILS
SIDEVIEW CLOSED
STARTING SHELVES
SHELF SLOTS
SUPPORT BEAMS TOP SHELF CLOSEUP TOP SHELF SLOT
23
BUNGEE HINGE
FEATURE
A safety precaution to prevent
pinching and injuries if a door
were to close on the user’s hand.
The ...
STRUCTURAL
CONSEQUENCE
Because the bungees stretch, the doors move flexibly and the top shelves
wobble from side to side. ...
WALK-THROUGH
Person 2 removes crooked shelves to make the piece functional:
Person 2 has to confront fear of unfamiliar object contamin...
Can use shelves as benchmarks of
progress and break points if overwhelmed
Assembly becomes easier from 1st to 3rd
shelf as...
BIBLIOGRAPHY
30
ABCNews. (Jun. 2007). “Living with OCD.” ABCNews. http://abcnews.go.com/US/video?id=3235103
ABCNews. (May....
V
WThe name VW was chosen for the similarity between the form
of the letters and the form of the piece. The piece looks li...
Interactive Furniture Design
Interactive Furniture Design
Interactive Furniture Design
Interactive Furniture Design
Interactive Furniture Design
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Interactive Furniture Design

  1. 1. V W AN INTERACTIVE FURNITURE PIECE FOR OCD RECOVERY
  2. 2. CONTENTS POPULATION RESEARCH CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT Sketch exploration Sketch evolution Concept Design & Model CONSTRUCTION FINAL PROTOTYPE Details WALK-THROUGH BIBLIOGRAPHY 3-5 7-15 8-9 10-11 12-13 14-15 17-19 21-25 23-25 27-29 30
  3. 3. POPULATION RESEARCH
  4. 4. OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER FAST FACTS Ranks in the top 10 of the most disabling illnesses of any kind, in terms of lost earnings and diminished quality of life. Affects males and females equally. On average begins for men during late adolescence and women during their early twenties. A person often waits an average of 10–15 years between symptoms developing and seeking treatment. 50% of all cases, will fall into the severe category, with less than 25% being classed as mild cases. MENTAL BEHAVIORS Obsessions = persistent and uncontrollable thoughts, images, impulses, worries, fears or doubts Thoughts interfere with the ability to function on a daily basis because they are difficult to ignore. Examples: PHYSICAL BEHAVIORS Compulsions = repetitive physical behaviors or mental thought rituals that are performed in an attempt to relieve the anxiety from obsessions Examples: Irrational worry about dirt, germs, or contamination Excessive concern with order, arrangement, or symmetry Preoccupation with losing or throwing away objects with little or no value Feeling overly responsible for the safety of others Cleaning - Repeatedly washing one’s hands, bathing, or cleaning household items, often for hours at a time Checking - Checking and several to hundreds of times a day that the doors are locked, the stove is turned off, etc Repeating - Inability to stop repeating a name, phrase, or simple activity Hoarding - Difficulty throwing away useless items such as old newspapers or magazines, bottle caps, or rubber bands Touching and arranging Mental rituals - Endless reviewing of conversations, counting 4
  5. 5. UNCOVEREDCASE STUDIES “It’s a full time job for me to live.” 15-year-old fears her whole family is contaminated and can’t sit near her mother let alone touch or hug her family members. She had to move out of her house because the fear and anxiety was so overwhelming. A man feared touching others because he believed he would contaminate them and if they were to get sick he would be at fault. A boy has obsessions where he must gnaw at doors, floors, or other dirty surfaces to relieve the anxiety from intrusive thoughts that if he doesn’t he or his family will be kidnapped or harmed. A man’s rituals of cleaning (showering multiple times, washing hands multiple times, doing laundry 5+ times), and counting (how much money he has/spent when shopping) led him to depression. TREATMENTS Cognitive Behavior Therapy (CBT) = focuses on examining the relationships between obsessive thoughts and compulsions Exposure & Response Prevention Therapy (ERP) = type of CBT that treats OCD by habituating sufferers to their anxieties through repeated exposure until they are no longer affected. Sessions last from 50-90 minutes with 12-20 sessions until recovery. Patients are prevented from engaging in rituals or compulsions during the exposure. Exposure exercises in session allow the patient and therapist to process anxieties and behaviors in real time. The more anxious one is the more helpful the therapist can be in addressing symptoms. MARKET RESEARCH There are little to no products available for sufferers of OCD. Most products are organization products that use the term colloquially, not diagonostically. Examples: 5
  6. 6. CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT
  7. 7. SKETCH EXPLORATION I began sketching with the idea of supporting the behaviors of people with OCD including touch avoidance, hoarding tendencies, and desires for order, exactness, and cleanliness. C. Smooth Forms for easy cleaning B. Storage with removable pieces for easy cleaning A. Coverable storage for reduced clutter 8
  8. 8. SKETCH EXPLORATION D. Modular storage units E. Modular storage F. Seating and storage 9
  9. 9. SKETCH EVOLUTION “Those suffering from obsessions or compulsions want to know one thing and one thing only; how to stop OCD.” Reading this changed the trajectory of concept development from supporting OCD behaviors to helping treat them through exposure and response prevention therapy. A. Beginning piece is neat, but non-functional. Person must remove pieces to make the piece functional, but reveals a disordered form. B. Person must tilt to off-balance, anxiety inducing direction to make shelf functional. C. Play with sense of balance to induce anxiety 10
  10. 10. SKETCH EVOLUTION D. Therapy seat has feared/contaminated person sit near patient, as patient progresses in treatment they can fold down pieces of the seat to be closer to the feared person. E. Person must work with another to reorder and assemble this unit to make it functional 11
  11. 11. CONCEPT The basis of Exposure & Response Prevention Therapy is to have the person with OCD directly confront their anxieties. The concept of VW is to provide hands on exposure to nonfunctional chaos in order to help overcome debilitating obsessions and compulsions. Because one of the most common obsessions is contamination I centered the design around person-person interaction. I chose to create a shelving unit to limit and organize the behavior of hoarding. The crooked, non-functional shelving provides the motive to touch and move the shelves (addressing fear of contamination), while the labor involved in assembling the piece to its resolved form requires another person (addressing the fear of contamination from other people). The interaction is intended to take place with a therapist present to help discuss anxieties as they are encountered. Confront obsessions with cleanliness, hoarding, and order by providing an interactive furniture unit that exposes the patient to these anxieties. Use one obsession (desire for neatness & order) to conquer another (fear of contamination). Make movable pieces easy to move and fit together. Create a resolved form that is safe, functional, and aesthetically balanced. GOALS RESOLVED DISORDER. 1. 2. 3. 4. 12
  12. 12. CONCEPT EXPLORATION FUNCTIONAL ANALYSIS BEHAVIOR Task may be too easy for 2 people to carry out, want them to communicate while working together, perhaps instructions should be minimal. Involves working with another person. This allows them to face a common anxiety of thinking they will or will be contaminated by another person, or will do harm to them. FORM Currently it sits on top of a table but that poses too many unforeseeable errors with the variability of where people choose to place it. 13
  13. 13. MATERIALS LIST Maple plywood 3/4 in Maple plywood 1/2 in Maple plywood 1/4 in Bungee cords 18 in Wood glue Nails Screws for support beams CAD FRONT VIEW CAD SIDE VIEW 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. This form idea came from turning the card- board model upward to make interaction and assembly more intensive. DESIGN 14
  14. 14. MODEL 15
  15. 15. CONSTRUCTION
  16. 16. CUTTING PIECES 18
  17. 17. ASSEMBLY 19
  18. 18. FINAL PROTOTYPE
  19. 19. SIDEFRONT 22
  20. 20. BOTTOM & TOP SHELF DETAILS SIDEVIEW CLOSED STARTING SHELVES SHELF SLOTS SUPPORT BEAMS TOP SHELF CLOSEUP TOP SHELF SLOT 23
  21. 21. BUNGEE HINGE FEATURE A safety precaution to prevent pinching and injuries if a door were to close on the user’s hand. The bungee stretches causing the door to move around the hand, rather than compressing it. 24
  22. 22. STRUCTURAL CONSEQUENCE Because the bungees stretch, the doors move flexibly and the top shelves wobble from side to side. This instability creates a level of anxiety the user has to confront while the piece is in its resolved form. 25
  23. 23. WALK-THROUGH
  24. 24. Person 2 removes crooked shelves to make the piece functional: Person 2 has to confront fear of unfamiliar object contamination while resolving anxiety from disorder2 Person 1 (assistant/source of contamination) opens and holds door for Person 2 (patient with OCD) 28
  25. 25. Can use shelves as benchmarks of progress and break points if overwhelmed Assembly becomes easier from 1st to 3rd shelf as anxiety increases Person with OCD overcomes anxieties Person 1 and 2 assemble shelves: Person 2 must confront fear of contamination by another person through close interaction 29
  26. 26. BIBLIOGRAPHY 30 ABCNews. (Jun. 2007). “Living with OCD.” ABCNews. http://abcnews.go.com/US/video?id=3235103 ABCNews. (May. 2014). “Overcoming OCD: The Children Who Break Away.” ABCNews. http://abcnews.go.com/2020/video/over- coming-ocd-children-break-23826782 ABCNews. (Nov. 2013). “The Strange Rituals of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder.” ABCNews. http://abcnews.go.com/2020/video/ strange-rituals-obsessive-compulsive-disorder-20911733 ADAA. (2010). Symptoms of OCD. Anxiety and Depression Association for America. http://www.adaa.org/understanding-anxiety/obsessive-compulsive-disorder-ocd/symptoms Eisen, J., Mancebo, M., Pinto, A., Coles, M., Pagano, M., Stout, R., & Rasmussen, S. (2006). Impact of obsessive-compulsive disor- der on quality of life. Comprehensive Psychiatry. 47 (4) 270-275. Ellison, C. (Aug, 2009). “Compulsion: Where Object Meets Anxiety.” The Design Observer Group. http://designobserver.com/fea- ture/compulsion-where-object-meets-anxiety/10427/ Goodman, W. (1989). The Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale. Arch Gen Psychiatry. http://www.stlocd.org/handouts/ YBOC-Symptom-Checklist.pdf OCD-UK. (2013). Understanding Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. OCD-United Kingdom. http://www.ocduk.org/ocd Kelly, Owen. (2013). “Exposure Therapy for OCD.” About Health. http://ocd.about.com/od/treatment/a/Exposure-Therapy-For-Ocd. htm Stengler-Wenzke, K., Kroll, M., Riedel-Heller, S., Matschinger, H., & Angermeyer, M. (2007). Quality of Life in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: The Different Impact of Obsessions and Compulsions. Psychopathology. 40(5), 282-9.
  27. 27. V WThe name VW was chosen for the similarity between the form of the letters and the form of the piece. The piece looks like a V and an inverted V. However, the extra lines on the W throw off the symmetry. Much like the piece itself the letters are almost perfectly aligned, but slightly off.

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