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Using Social Media for Service Recovery

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Using Social Media for Service Recovery

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Slides from my Mayo Clinic Social Media Health Network webinar delivered May 21, 2015. Covering:
• how to efficiently monitor social media for service recovery opportunities, whether you work on a team or are the only one handling social media for your organization.
• handling common service recovery situations.
• taking service recovery one step further to develop a social media-based recognition program designed to surprise and delight key members of your online community.

Slides from my Mayo Clinic Social Media Health Network webinar delivered May 21, 2015. Covering:
• how to efficiently monitor social media for service recovery opportunities, whether you work on a team or are the only one handling social media for your organization.
• handling common service recovery situations.
• taking service recovery one step further to develop a social media-based recognition program designed to surprise and delight key members of your online community.

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Using Social Media for Service Recovery

  1. 1. Relationship Resuscitation Using Social Media for Service Recovery 5/25/2015 1@AmandaChanguris
  2. 2. Most of the time, it’s good. 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 2
  3. 3. People Get Upset When people get upset, they: • Want a solution • Want to vent • Want to “make you pay” in the court of public opinion 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 3
  4. 4. Sentiment & Behavior Flow Patients / Customers Happy / Neutral Upset Let You Know Offline Online Seethe in Silence 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 4
  5. 5. 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 5
  6. 6. Step One: Listen So You Can Hear • Invest in a Paid Tool o Argyle Social o HootSuite Pro / Enterprise o Spredfast, Falcon Social, Sprinklr , Shoutlet, Percolate o Radian6 • Use Free Tools for Redundancy o Platform Notifications o Google Alerts o Talkwalker o Hyper Alerts o Nutshell Mail 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 6
  7. 7. Step Two: Respond. Fast. • 39% expect a response within an hour • Average response time: 3.99 hours 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 7
  8. 8. Step Two: Respond. Fast. 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 8
  9. 9. Step Three: Respond Well • First Response Essentials: o Empathy o Blameless Apology o Offer Assistance • ACID Test o Acknowledge o Contain o Inform o Direct 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 9
  10. 10. Be Human • Address the person by name • Consider using “I” rather than “we” • Have a personality (and use it wisely) 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 10
  11. 11. Be Human 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 11
  12. 12. Canned Responses It’s tempting… but please just don’t. 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 12
  13. 13. Canned Responses 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 13
  14. 14. Challenge: Complaints After the Fact 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 14
  15. 15. Challenge: Coordinated Complaints • #dontdenykevin 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 15
  16. 16. Challenge: Issues that Keep Coming Back 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 16
  17. 17. Challenge: Issues that Keep Coming Back 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 17
  18. 18. Beyond Recovery • What Would Retail Do? • The Plan: o Identify the right candidates o Make the gesture personal (if possible) o No promotion o Avoid public posts (if possible) 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 18
  19. 19. Put It to Work! • Don’t expect it to be easy… • But don’t take the negativity personally. • Questions? 5/25/2015@AmandaChanguris 19

Editor's Notes

  • A major challenge for health care providers is that patients and family members will often wait until they’re discharged to tell you they’re not happy (at least online).

    This example is an oldie but a goodie from back in my hospital days. Kevin’s daughter-in-law came to our hospital and – at least according to him – was with us for almost a month before we transferred her to the University of Maryland, where they were able to give her effective treatment.

    If I take this as gospel truth, I’m appalled at all of the slackers at my hospital that can’t treat this poor woman … but I’m pretty sure there’s a lot more to the story than this tidbit.

    I don’t need to know the details in order to respond with empathy and a blameless apology, but an offer of assistance is a tougher sell. I’m glad his daughter-in-law is doing well now, but there’s not a great deal I – or we as a hospital – have to offer.

    Just like we’ve discussed, I start with empathy and a blameless apology. In his original post, Kevin posited that we’d just delete his comments and move on, so I take a moment to reassure him that we won’t remove his post and – again – apologize for the experience.

    Then I reached out to my friends in the hospital’s patient relations department. While we couldn’t do anything to improve his daughter-in-law’s experience, we could demonstrate that we took his feedback seriously and wanted to get the details so we could make sure something similar wouldn’t happen again.

    This may or may not be of any comfort to Kevin or his daughter-in-law, but to an impartial third party we’ve taken some tough criticism to heart and taken the actions available to us to dig into the details and learn from whatever happened. That’s worth a little good faith.

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