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[Slides] Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era by Altimeter Group

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[Slides] Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era by Altimeter Group

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Slides for Altimeter's webinar: Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era

Watch the webinar replay at: http://www.slideshare.net/Altimeter/recording-strengthening-employee-relationships-in-the-digital-era-by-altimeter-group

Download the report at: pages.altimetergroup.com/strengthening-employee-relationships-report.html

Description:

Employees are disengaged at work. Yet Altimeter found that only 46% of organizations take a strategic approach to employee engagement, and only 43% believe they have an organizational culture of trust and empowerment.

In this 1-hour webinar, Charlene Li and Jon Cifuentes share research on how leading organizations use social and digital technologies to create holistic employee engagement strategies that drive business impact and cultural change.

Slides for Altimeter's webinar: Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era

Watch the webinar replay at: http://www.slideshare.net/Altimeter/recording-strengthening-employee-relationships-in-the-digital-era-by-altimeter-group

Download the report at: pages.altimetergroup.com/strengthening-employee-relationships-report.html

Description:

Employees are disengaged at work. Yet Altimeter found that only 46% of organizations take a strategic approach to employee engagement, and only 43% believe they have an organizational culture of trust and empowerment.

In this 1-hour webinar, Charlene Li and Jon Cifuentes share research on how leading organizations use social and digital technologies to create holistic employee engagement strategies that drive business impact and cultural change.

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[Slides] Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era by Altimeter Group

  1. 1. Webinar Strengthening Employee Relationships in the Digital Era Charlene Li, Industry Analyst Jon Cifuentes, Sr. Researcher January 20, 2015 Event hashtag: #employeeengagement Engage via Chat Window
  2. 2. Agenda ∙ Welcome ∙ Research Highlights ∙ The State of Employee Engagement and Advocacy ∙ Driving Business Impact ∙ Recommendations ∙ Q&A
  3. 3. Employee Engagement is: A term used to describe three primary types of initiatives. 1.) Internal collaboration 2.) Digital/social empowerment 3.) Employee advocacy
  4. 4. Defining Digital Employee Engagement
  5. 5. Agenda ∙ Welcome ∙ Research Highlights ∙ The State of Employee Engagement and Advocacy ∙ Driving Business Impact ∙ Recommendations ∙ Q&A
  6. 6. Research Highlights • Only 41% of organizations believe they have a holistic and strategic approach to employee engagement and advocacy. • Only 43% of survey respondents believe they have an organizational culture of trust that supports employee engagement. • Only 36% and 25% of respondents have organizations where many employees use their internal collaboration platform and enterprise social network, respectively.
  7. 7. Agenda ∙ Welcome ∙ Research Highlights ∙ The State of Employee Engagement and Advocacy ∙ Driving Business Impact ∙ Recommendations ∙ Q&A
  8. 8. Most companies lack a coherent approach to digital employee engagement “Which department leads employee engagement initiatives in your organization?” Base: 88 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  9. 9. Involvement all over the organization, but a lack of coordination “What other departments are involved in Employee Engagement initiatives in your organization?” Base: 88 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  10. 10. Employee engagement efforts affect everyone, and rarely have a holistic strategy (or home) Base: 52 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014) “With which of the following statements do you agree? Percentages are those that agree and strongly agree”
  11. 11. Q&A • Who feels their organization looks at employee engagement holistically, and/or actively pursues employee engagement broadly across the organization? • Who is the owner? Who is accountable?
  12. 12. Digital technology deployments suffer from a lack of business focus and platform fatigue “Below is a list of Employee Engagement platforms and programs. Please indicate the level of deployment for each internal collaboration platform” Base: 55 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  13. 13. Many organizations lack wide adoption of employee engagement programs “How widely are external social channels used by the following departments to engage with people outside the organization?” Base: 56 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  14. 14. Employee Engagement leaders have strategic desired outcomes from programs “Please rank each of the following desired outcomes for your Employee Engagement initiatives by order of most important to least important for your organization” Base: 64companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  15. 15. But actual metrics don’t align to strategic goals “Please rank which metrics you use the most to describe the impact of your Employee Engagement programs” Base: 57 companies with more than 250 employees (surveyed by Altimeter Group Q3 2014)
  16. 16. Socially engaged companies have more engaged employees Base: 1,378 respondents in the Control group. 1,460 respondents in the Socially Engaged group from companies with more than 1,000 employees (Surveyed by LinkedIn and Altimeter Group Q2 2014)
  17. 17. Q&A • How digitally/socially engaged are people in your organization? Internally? Externally? • What platforms do they use to engage?
  18. 18. Agenda ∙ Welcome ∙ Research Highlights ∙ The State of Employee Engagement and Advocacy ∙ Driving Business Impact ∙ Recommendations ∙ Q&A
  19. 19. Better employee relationships improve customer relationships – and vice versa Source: Altimeter Group
  20. 20. Case study: TD Bank Group’s Employee Engagement evolution
  21. 21. Map employee journeys to deepen relationships Source: Altimeter Group
  22. 22. Measure and develop each employee relationship Source: IBM
  23. 23. Activity and network metrics provide insight for employee development Source: Altimeter Group
  24. 24. Employee Engagement platforms divide – internal and external engagement
  25. 25. Further out: an “Employee Engagement Cloud” will emerge as a suite
  26. 26. Agenda ∙ Welcome ∙ Research Highlights ∙ The State of Employee Engagement and Advocacy ∙ Driving Business Impact ∙ Recommendations ∙ Q&A
  27. 27. 1. Become an Extroverted Enterprise, Starting with Executives  Embrace fluidity, transparency, and speed in employee communications.  Don’t wait to be informed by your employees – actively seek opinions from them (and customers)  Executives must be comfortable bridging the “power distance” within the organization
  28. 28. 2. Support Employee Engagement with a culture of content  Start with existing, pre- populated content (beginners)  Create your own content.  Choose a platform to involve employees at scale.
  29. 29. 3. Make HR more strategic by injecting marketing best practices  CHROs and CMOs need to form a tight bond  Marketing needs the support of HR to activate employee engagement that delights customers  HR needs to tap marketing skills to better understand and engage employees
  30. 30. 4. Close the employee trust gap with training  Trust is a reciprocal relationship – and a culture of trust requires constant reinforcement  Be clear and specific on what employees can and can’t do  Focus on positive reinforcement
  31. 31. 5. Integrate tools to create the employee engagement cloud  Resist bright, shiny objects  Live by this code: Change & train new behaviors before choosing new tools
  32. 32. Thank You Disclaimer: Although the information and data used in this report have been produced and processed from sources believed to be reliable, no warranty expressed or implied is made regarding the completeness, accuracy, adequacy or use of the information. The authors and contributors of the information and data shall have no liability for errors or omissions contained herein or for interpretations thereof. Reference herein to any specific product or vendor by trade name, trademark or otherwise does not constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation or favoring by the authors or contributors and shall not be used for advertising or product endorsement purposes. The opinions expressed herein are subject to change without notice. Altimeter Group provides research and advisory for companies challenged by business disruptions, enabling them to pursue new opportunities and business models. Jon Cifuentes Senior Researcher @joncifuentes Charlene Li Industry Analyst @charleneli

Editor's Notes

  • Internal Collaboration example:
    -Erin Grotts at ConAgra foods shared that their phone on the internal comms side doesn’t ring off the hook like it used to, or at all. They’ve developed a self policing community that does all of these collaboration actvities on their own, with little prompting.
    Digital/Social Empowerment:
    We see a lot of activity here in areas of the business that traditionally touch customers directly like Sales and Marketing. Tom Eggemeier, who leads Sales at Genesys has done so much work in customer experience here. It’s not often you see the head of sales leading social and digital training sessions, but he’s doing just that.
    -TD another example. Some approved employees in local markets doing customer service directly on Facebook. We’ll talk more about them in detail in the coming slides.
    Employee Advocacy:
    Whole new breed of vendors cropping up to support this. Companies like Peoplelinx, SocialChorus, Addvocate, Influitive. Tools designed to bring content right to your workers fingertips as a syndication channel. There is a danger here, though. In Parroting messages.
  • Interesting disparity in the actual interviews. Many examples of employee communications, marketing and sales. Few in HR that claimed to truly lead efforts. HR was always involved, but few interviews revealed partnerships in the organization that looked at employee engagement broadly across multiple places.
    For the listeners, we’d love to hear who leads employee engagement in your organization. Or if you’re surprised by any one particular group’s underrepresentation.
  • Most surprising:
    Only 20% of IT teams involved in employee engagement, in addition to the previous question where 1% led initiatives. Considering how social and digital tools and technologies power a lot of these examples, it’s just surprising not to hear them come up more. For the audience, have you seen any really great partnerships in IT and a line of business around employee engagement? We’d love to talk with you.
    58% of executive team was involved in employee engagement initiatives. This felt really aspirational and was not reflected in our interviews. In a few cases, there was some really transformational outcomes as a result of executive engagement.
    TELUS Example:
    Different stages of TELUS. The Coming Together stage where canadian telecoms were de-regulated. TELUS was put together in 1999. 2000-2007 era that was difficult. Evidence from Customer and employee satisfaction that everything wasn’t great. 2008-2014 is the 2nd era. Great brand, smart, happy ppl that want to do good. Executive team wanted to take a crack at employee engagement. Most senior levels - wanted to instill an Open Leadership mantra. Btw 2008-2011, started planting seeds. Company wide leadership principles. Telus Leadership Philosophy (TLP). Open, collaborative behaviors. Introduced “fair process” inside of TLP - simple model: 5 e’s. Engage, Explore ideas, Explain what ou decided, Execute, Evaluate. Which is A LOT different than the command and control culture we’ve experienced at other large organizations.
  • Most surprised to see 41% believe their organization has a holistic and strategic approach to employee engagement considering the previous data where ownership and involvement is all over the map, in various slices. How can there be a holistic strategy if only 35% believe they have a clear owner.
    We expect the data point on “social technologies” to rise in 2015. Question for the audience: Offhand, which social technologies does your org utilize?
  • Wendy Arnott – who heads social for TD shared: I think platform fatigue is a huge issue for us. We’re using so many different tools for different groups right now. For our own management it’s an issue. But from a user perspective - whether it’s a service agent on 3 or 4 diff platforms to engage with customers. They understand why we have it (certain tools), but it does not like their life easier. Most won’t use the native desktop app. There’s no one tool that does it all. Somehow we have to have a way of presenting it in a more integrated way.
    Even with Connections - the top adopters at the executive level are early adopters on many to many external programs. They’re saying - Why can’t I do my status update in Twitter and have it show up in Connections? Why do I have to go back and forth. This hasn’t caught up to what I need.
    We expect to see Social channels for recruiting, and content amplification platforms designed to tap into employee advocacy to rise in 2015.
  • It’s interesting to see how low Customer Support, Sales, and HR tracked across the survey in digital tools communicating directly with customers or prospects. In qualitative interviews with the more mature organizations, this was much higher. There are many examples of sales reps and managers interacting with customer, HR with prospects, and so forth. With customer experience such a growing, huge prioritiy for organizations, we expect 3 of these categories to trend upwards.
    Particularly in Sales, where JC, CL, and LS will be releasing a report this quarter on social selling taking shape in the enterprise, the sales/marketing collaborative, use cases, best practices, and metrics for developing a social sales program. Many organizations are entering this process now and need guidance.
  • Very high level goals in ‘appropriate’ sounding rank order for strategic initiatives. It’s too bad it almost never materializes that way. (next slide).
  • We call this the “honor student bumper sticker” metric. It’s also interesting that a strategic goal with a long list of effects like employee satisfaction and retention being so high – when HR so rarely leads employee engagement efforts, at least in this survey.
  • Pretty tremendous research that shows the relationship between companies engaged in social and their ability to be more successful, compete for the best talent, and create open, informed, transparent culture.
    They found:
    -Employee engagement in general to be at an all time low, around 13% as reported by Gallup. Non-moving stat for 10 years. Over 2x that amount of employees are so disengaged, they’re hurting their culture
    -Execs lead the way and set the standard for engagement
    -Socially engaged companies are more competitive, get more leads, and recruit better talent.
    Mirrors really industry leading research by Capgemeni on the digital advantage – how companies prioritizing digital generally win – on both marketshare and profitability.
  • #CL
  • #CL
  • #JC
    As discussed before:
    -Companies seem to be deploying programs with strategic goals in mind.
    -The actual metrics they use to quantify employee engagement efforts are archaic compared to the types of tools companies use to measure customer behavior.
    -The next wave of employee metrics is coming, IBM is leading the charge with effort like the Personal Social Dashboard. Orgs have advantage of all employee data contained. The disadvantage is that its spread all over the place. As companies develop employee engagement cloud – with an underpinning of analytics, they’ll be able to better measure and account for employee behaviors across the organization. IBM calls this the “digital memory of the org”
    -The challenge creating a measurement framework for employee engagement is that we tend think of analytics from a traditional BI background. It makes sense to measure transactional data (posts, likes, shares). Counting transactions and correlating predictions is how many analytics organizations function to produce results for their businesses.
    -But it’s a different story with people. Employees, like consumers, are on a constant journey in the organization
    -The set of analysis needs to be personalized to the individual – where the view of their network, priorities, and results – are correlated to business outcomes.
    -The tools haven’t quite caught up to this need, but IBM is getting there.
    -IBM Measures:
    ·      Activity: What you do
    ·      Reaction: How others react to it
    ·      Eminence: How others react to you, leadership and influence among your specific communities
    ·      Network: How you are connected
    ·      Should we add Affinity here as a recommendation? – are the reactions positive and in the direction of the company
    -Some key questions to ask:
    -How do engagement levels predict passion areas?
    -How can we know whether or not certain employees/groups will successfully innovate around new ideas?
    -Everyone can verbalize a journey in an organization, but if you want to be driven by data – how can data impact roles employees take in their personal growth, what areas to grow into, and what opportunities are open to them?
    These are the ways we need to be considering employee metrics. Not by how often they log into their ESN and by what they post. Those are just signals that make up a complicated matrix of what matters to that employee, and how they impact the organization.
  • #CL
  • 3 primary sets of data points to account for:
    -Workers (the thousands of digital facets that make up their workplace identity)
    -Communication (email, telephone, video, and chat)
    -Attachments (primarily documents, images, video) - and this is the key - with an underpinning of analytics that can rationalize, account for, and eventually predict our behaviors as workers - we won’t pull ourselves out of this feature mess.
  • Articulate/Crystallize- purpose, differentiation, philosophy, vision
    Evangelism: How content embodies brand values must be clear to every BRAND level, from the C-suite to functional leads to practitioners.
    Worthiness: This alignment should be a guiding force and benchmark for what constitutes worthy and authentic branded content.
    Every company should have its own understanding of purpose, differentiation, philosophy, and vision. While these will vary from company to company, brands must articulate how content serves those elements underlying the very identity of the brand. How content embodies brand values must be clear to every BRAND level, from the C-suite to functional leads to practitioners. This alignment should be a guiding force and benchmark for what constitutes worthy and authentic branded content.
  • Customer-oriented companies win out. There’s a correlation to customer-oriented companies being employee-oriented companies. That typical marketing expertise (data analysis, insights, engagement) – is bleeding into various areas of the organization with massive success. Those skills don’t exist on their own in HR, Communications, Sales, etc.

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