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Sequentially Cold Forming Simulation of Complex Shaped Heavy Plates

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Sequentially Cold Forming Simulation of Complex Shaped Heavy Plates

  1. 1. Sequentially Cold Forming Simulation ofComplex Shaped Heavy Plates23.04.2013 © 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGYAuthors:Steffen Garke, Ralf Tschullik, Patrick Kaeding(Chair of Ship Structures – University of Rostock)
  2. 2. Agenda• University of Rostock• Chair of Ship Structure• Problem Definition• Process Analysis• Process Simulation• Results• Conclusion• Prospects• Question and Answers• References2© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:
  3. 3. 3© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:University of RostockFacts:• oldest university in the Baltic Sea region (founded 1419)• 9 faculties (+ one central interdisciplinary faculty)• 5.000 employees + 15.000 studentsFigure 2: Research – Third-party funds (in million Euro) (1)Figure 1: Students – distribution to the faculties (1)
  4. 4. 4© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Chair of Ship StructuresMain tasks:• numerical methods for ship and offshorestructural design• marine steel constructions• material science for ship and offshore structures• production and outfittingResearch Project:• GrundVorm (Numerical Study for a New ThickPlate Forming Process)• heavy plates multidimensional curved• variable in thickness• superposition of forming and rolling
  5. 5. 5© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Problem Definition• heavy steel plates• thickness: 4 mm – 100 mm• marine technology, wind turbines• production quality requirements increase• deformed manually• optimized hull-forms, complex shaped plates• one-of-a-kind productions• flexible production process necessary• time consuming• several hundreds of steps• machine and tool-changing necessary• quality related to workerFigure 3: flow dynamics around a bulb bow (2)Figure 4: worker during forming process (3)
  6. 6. 6© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:• enlargement of heavy plates applications• e.g. offshore components• repeating structures• efficient and profitable manufacturingautomation of existing processFigure 5: rotor blade of an offshore wind turbine (4)Needs:• process-analysis• physical understanding• accurate simulationsFigure 6: forming-process (3)Problem Definition - Purpose
  7. 7. 7© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Figure 7: fore ship bulb bow (3)Gaussian curvature:→ developable surfaceK = k1k2=1r11r2= 0Figure 8: extracted plate (3)here: K ≠ 0Stretch Forming!Process Analysis - Beginning• exemplary plate• part of an existing fore ship• complex shaped• not developable surface• local material stretching necessary
  8. 8. 8© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Process Analysis - WorkflowFigure 9: workflow forming process (3)• totally 1.477 steps• experiment duration 3 days• shape controlling• laser scanningFigure 10: shape control with templates (3)automation without changingprocess impossible!
  9. 9. 9© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Process SimulationFigure 11: force-time diagram (3)challenges:• accurate simulation model• smaller validation experiments• scaled ship building press (1:4)• one step deformation• expected high computation time• explicit solution (RADIOSS)• solid elements (3 over plate thickness)• real-time (1,7 seconds per stroke)• unknown position of next tool contact → stop simulation after every stroke → saveelement state → find next position → move and rotate tool → restart simulation → …automated sequential calculation necessary!
  10. 10. 10© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:• MATLAB® - Environment• control forming process• call HyperMesh (batch)• call RADIOSS (batch)• read results• calculate tool positionFigure 13: work-flow Forming Tool (3)Figure 12: predefined tool-contact-lines (3)Process Simulation - Forming Tool
  11. 11. Results11© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:• facts• 94 forming steps to calculate• nonlinear material behavior• sensors (force-controlled-forming)• contact formulations• calculation - time → 18 days• average time per step 4,5 hoursFigure 15: deformation overview (3)Figure 14: start-position (3)
  12. 12. 12© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Figure 16: plastic strain – step 37 of 94 (3)Figure 17: comparison simulation and laser scan (3)Results - Discussion 1• Forming-Tool works• all steps continuous calculated• expected local permanent deformations• global deformation follows reality(comparison with laser scans)• no quantitative comparison!
  13. 13. 13© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Figure 18: comparison simulation and laser scan - full (3)• laser scan after 25% of forming process• 300 forming steps in reality• compressed to 94 simulation stepsResults - Discussion 2
  14. 14. Conclusion14© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:• detailed view inside of forming processes of complex shaped heavy plates• large documentation of an exemplary plate-forming• validation experiments• simulation models• RADIOSS based Forming-Tool• basis for an automated forming process
  15. 15. Prospects15© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:• reducing calculation time• simulation of the whole process• detailed result comparison• update the Forming-Tool• avoid third-party programs• optimize the tool positioning (→ similar to contact search algorithm)• reduce to main forming steps• repeat experiment with calculated data
  16. 16. Questions and Answers16© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:Thank you for your attention!funded by the ministry of economics, labour and tourism of the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern
  17. 17. References(1) Kanzler (Head of Administration and Finance/Member of the Board) Support PositionControlling, “The University in Figures”, Rostock, 2012.(2) Lindner, H., ”Verifizierung und Validierung von numerischen Schleppversuchen miteinem frei trimm- und tauchenden Schiffsmodell”, diploma thesis, Faculty ofMechanical Engineering and Marine Technology – Ship Design, University of Rostock,Rostock, 2012.(3) Garke, S., “Numerische Untersuchungen beim Reckprozess von Grobblechen”,diploma thesis, Faculty of Mechanical and Marine Technology – Ship Structures,University of Rostock, Rostock, 2012.(4) Tschullik, R., “Verfahrensentwicklung zur 3D Verformung von Grobblech”, Europatag,2010.17© 2013 UNIVERSITY ROSTOCK | FACULTY OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING AND MARINE TECHNOLOGY23.04.2013funded by:

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