Small Data: a Brief History and a New Design Philosophy

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My talk from recent SPARK Boston event held at OpenView Partners in July 2016

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Small Data: a Brief History and a New Design Philosophy

  1. 1. SMALL DATA Allen Bonde, SVP Marketing (@abonde)
  2. 2. Agenda 1. Three views of SMALL DATA...and a brief history 2. Data and the Customer Journey 3. A new DESIGN Philosophy 4. Use Case - new Placester mobile app 5. Learnings 2
  3. 3. Three views Open Knowledge Foundation “The trail of digital data breadcrumbs as we go about our days” – Deborah Estrin “The amount of data you can conveniently store and process on a single machine, and in particular a high-end laptop” – Rufus Pollock The Small Data Lab at Cornell “Seemingly insignificant behavioral observations containing very specific attributes pointing towards an unmet customer need” – Martin Lindstrom Martin Lindstrom
  4. 4. Open Source Tools Big Data Defined Era of Wearables Begins A brief history...and my definition 2014 “Small Data” Defined 2016 “Small data connects people with timely, meaningful insights (derived from big data and/or “local” sources), organized and packaged – often visually – to be accessible, understandable, and actionable for everyday tasks” – Digital Clarity Group Forbes op-ed on small data + IoT NYT feature on Drowning in Numbers World Economic Forum feature Hortonworks buys Onyara Medium feature on Tinder-like apps AdAge op-ed on personalized apps Nature feature on small data and “long tail” of neuroscience Forbes op-ed on omni-channel and 1:1 2015 Martin Lindstrom book on Small Data
  5. 5. ANSWERS Not Data “To serve the broadest set of business objectives and users, the goal isn’t just to accumulate more data assets…it’s about collecting what data is already available, discovering its meaning (in context) and delivering the right data in the right format to the broadest set of users” 5
  6. 6. DATA AND THE CUSTOMER JOURNEY 6
  7. 7. How data impacts the customer journey Smarter consumers... demand smarter apps Inform me Connect me Be helpful! Motivate me Use data to drive behaviorTailor offers and experiences Mobile Data-driven Visual What do I need? Which one? Am I sure?
  8. 8. How can we educate our audience with the right data? Turn it into visual stories, and leverage what we know from transactional small data (purchase history, what’s in stock) to tailor campaigns and offers. Inform me
  9. 9. Connect me How can we connect buyers with the brand and brand advocates? Harvest social small data like gestures, reviews and testimonials (UGC), creating insights that amplify our message and validate choices.
  10. 10. Motivate me How can we drive action? The right data in the form of recommendations or alerts (based on triggers or other environmental small data) can boost conversions.
  11. 11. Devices that CREATE + Consume Data The Internet of Things and Wearables offer to shift the focus of analytics further to embedded use cases and small data, and create more devices that both create and consume local information! 11
  12. 12. A NEW DESIGN PHILOSOPHY 12
  13. 13. Small data thinking should inform our design simple “visual, intuitive, single-purpose-ish” smart “predictive, proactive, accurate” responsive “portable, localized…wearable?” social “social inputs, shareable”
  14. 14. Principle #1: Make it simple Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication. Simple means being visual, intuitive, and single-purpose as possible. Presenting a featured recommendation at just the right point in the buying cycle, or delivering a proactive text alert to notify customers that their order is ready. Driven by data, but presented as pictures, charts or answers.
  15. 15. Principle #2: Make it smart Does this approach deliver useful or unique insights? Small data-powered apps should be the “go-to” source. Tell customers just what they need to know and in the fewest steps. Smart apps use structured and unstructured data, and insights from online and offline channels. And make sure results are trusted and repeatable.
  16. 16. Principle #3: Be responsive Deliver insights where customers are and where employees want to work. Responsive means being portable, localized, and mobile ready. As the form factor of computing evolves and innovations such as next-gen wearable devices and IoT go mainstream, small data applications will be the first killer apps – outside and inside organizations.
  17. 17. Principle #4: Be social Small data is social by nature – it’s about us. Tools for creating small data apps and campaigns need to foster sharing. They need to be “in the language” of relevant social networks and wired up for collecting feedback. Embedding social sharing immediately helps to amplify an audience and create new inputs for further analysis.
  18. 18. USE CASE 18
  19. 19. New Placester Mobile App Leads and Tasks Dashboard Just the right CRM features that agents and brokers need Data-driven marketing automation and collaboration Get visibility into what’s going on in my business (deals) One Communication Inbox Portable, location-savvy communication with the right people at the right moment Answer questions and see activity, take notes, and set reminders Push notifications and alerts to drive behavior simple smart
  20. 20. Next best action which lead to call or email next? which properties may be a new seller lead opportunity? which steps need attention to close my next deal? View Listings Search leads and property listings, get details and trends Leverage location data and maps Smart buyer tools to calculate affordability + payments social New Placester Mobile App responsive
  21. 21. LEARNINGS 21
  22. 22. Design to the TASK... Establish end goal for your small data – are you looking to understand or engage users? Examine influence points in journey – are you looking to inform, connect, or motivate? Good information design matters! 22
  23. 23. ...and deliver an EXPERIENCE with data! Map the “Ins” and Outs” – what are key breadcrumbs + how will you apply to unmet needs? Select the type(s) of data-driven output that will drive the desired behavior - e.g. alert, chart, dashboard, map, task list, recommendation etc. Keep it simple! 23
  24. 24. THANK YOU! Contact me: abonde@placester.com or @abonde

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