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Math 1200 Teaching Formats Overview for registration

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Math 1200 Teaching Formats Overview for registration

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This set of slides gives some main points of the differences between MATH 1200 formats (traditional lecture and hybrid), what might make you choose each format, and how you find the needed information for registration.

This set of slides gives some main points of the differences between MATH 1200 formats (traditional lecture and hybrid), what might make you choose each format, and how you find the needed information for registration.

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Math 1200 Teaching Formats Overview for registration

  1. 1. MATH 1200 Teaching Formats Overview University of Denver Winter 2017
  2. 2. Calculus Options for Daniels Students MATH 1200 Calculus for Business and Social Sciences • Covers differential calculus and interpretations in the real world • Typical AI-N calculus course for most Daniels students • No trigonometry used • Take MATH 1010 if needing algebra prep for MATH 1200 MATH 1951 Calculus I • Covers differential Calculus for Math, Science, and Engineering majors and minors • More theoretical, precise, broader scope of functions • Expects fluency in algebra and trigonometry • Take MATH 1750 if needing algebra and trigonometry prep for MATH 1951
  3. 3. What to expect: MATH 1200 • Study functions, limits, derivatives, meanings: – Includes polynomial, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic functions • Connections to interpretation and application in real-world contexts: – Business, Economics, Social sciences • Online Homework and Written Assignments • Midterm Exams and Final Exam
  4. 4. Two MATH 1200 formats Traditional (Lecture) • Meets MTWR • 50-minute meetings with 60 students • Learning is lecture-based • Instructor presents material in class, practice after class • Friday Lab – 30 students with TA – Recitation and quiz Hybrid (“Flipped” Class) • Meets TRF • 50-minute meetings with 30 students • Online prior to class: – Introductory topics & practice • During face-to-face class: – Facilitated deeper learning & practice • Two extra dates for scheduled 60-student midterms
  5. 5. Why are there two formats? • MATH 1200 has large enrollments and diverse student audience seeking a quality experience • MATH 1200 Hybrid aims to deliver the same course content in a way that is: – more interactive in class – more supportive with smaller class size – more efficient: “new” online, then explore in class
  6. 6. Why choose Lecture format? • MATH 1200 in traditional format best meets certain types of learners – Requires active listening and note-taking – Interaction with instructor in larger group – Individualized learning occurs independently or in office hours – Scheduled daily interaction with calculus in a face- to-face class
  7. 7. Why choose Hybrid format? • MATH 1200 Hybrid format includes – Interaction with instructor in smaller group – Clear expectations of what to study before class – Individualized learning “built-in” • Watch/stop videos and review at your pace • Facilitated practice and support during class – Engage with calculus daily, but according to your schedule on the days without face-to-face class – May benefit your learning needs or schedule
  8. 8. Which sections are which? • MATH 1200 Portfolio page has details on sections: https://portfolio.du.edu/math1200 • Traditional “Lecture” sections – 4-credit sections meet MTWR every week – Associated 0-credit “Lab” sections meet F only • “Combined/Hybrid” sections – Sign up for one of the 4-credit sections meeting on TRF throughout the quarter. – Schedule lists two midterm exam meeting dates on Mondays. – There will be a separate final exam (currently not posted). • Online Schedule of Classes lists the days/dates when sections meet and which labs to select: http://www.du.edu/registrar/course
  9. 9. Good Luck in your MATH 1200 class at DU!

Editor's Notes

  • All students entering or intending secondary admission to Daniels College of Business need credit for a Calculus course as a major requirement and a prerequisite for the required first-year course, INFO 1020, which most students take in Spring Quarter of their freshman year.
    DU offers two Calculus course options, MATH 1200 and MATH 1951.
    MATH 1200 Calculus for Business and Social Sciences teaches differential calculus concepts (without trigonometry) with an eye to their real-world applications and interpretations, and is the appropriate AI-N calculus class for students majoring in business and the social sciences. Topics include limits, differential calculus of one variable, including exponential and logarithmic functions, and applications of calculus to business and the social sciences.
    MATH 1951 Calculus I is the first-year Calculus course taught to Mathematics, Science, and Engineering majors and minors at DU. It introduces limits and derivations in a precise manner, and emphasizes both conceptual understanding and technical skills, with applications to many potential fields. Students who have sent their AP scores of 4 or 5 on Calculus AB or BC will have credit for Calculus I on their transcripts.
  • Most students will register for the traditional format of MATH 1200, as there are more sections in this format. Lecture format meets the needs of students who are active listeners in class, taking notes and determining what they need to get out of lecture, and listening with that in mind. You’ll interact with the instructor in a classroom of 60 students on a daily basis, which may be more in your comfort zone. You’ll be in class every day of the week at the same time, which fits students who appreciate routine. To connect more with your instructor or to get smaller-scale attention, you can visit office hours.
  • Students who choose the hybrid format are looking for some of its differences from traditional lecture. According to student feedback, the smaller 30-student class size is a main benefit of the hybrid format. Students appreciated the connection with the faculty member that this afforded. Additionally the scheduling (3 days/week face to face) and how class time is used can be a benefit for students. You’ll be told what you need to do to be prepared for class, which will be a combination of watching videos and associated practice problems. Since the video watching is on your time in between class meetings, you have more flexibility with when you do that classwork, and you can pause, go back, and review the material as much as you need it, a benefit that is not always possible in a “live” lecture. F2F time in hybrid class is focused on deepening understanding of the introductory material you have seen before class, with an emphasis on doing practice to apply what you are learning. This is beneficial as often MATH 1200 students find completing the intermediate or mastery level problems can be a challenge once they leave the classroom; in hybrid sections, you’ve ironed out some of those challenges before you go home for the day.

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