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History of Honey/
Honey bees in World
A Report By
Mr.Allah Dad Khan
150 million years
• Firstly, opinions vary
about how long honey
bees have been around
on the planet: some
sources state th...
100m years ago
• The latest bee find, one
preserved in amber found
in Myanmar (Burma), now
dates bees to an estimated
100 ...
96-74 million yrs ago
• The oldest known fossil bee, a stingless bee
named Trigona prisca, was found in the Upper
Cretaceo...
65m yrs Ago
• The honey bee first appeared
on our planet in the Tertiary
period at the beginning of the
Cenozoic era, that...
40 million yrs ago
• Dating back to over 40
million years before the
evolution of man,
Honey is the oldest
sweetener exist...
20-10 million yrs ago
• -Honey-storing social
bees developed during
the Miocene, between
20-10 million years ago.
These be...
Australopithicus, 4M BC
2.5 million yrs ago
• Anthropologists have
suggested
early Homo was a meat-
and-potatoes kind of
hominid. Starting
roughly...
300000 yrs ago
• Researchers at the Uppsala
University used genomic
analysis to decode
evolutionary history of
honeybees. ...
100000 yrs Ago
• Honey was the most
important sweetener for
food and alcoholic drinks in
ancient times. So important
were ...
130000yrs ago
• Neanderthal
• Neanderthals had a
higher volume to surface
ratio, with shorter legs
and a bigger body,
comp...
30000 yrsago
• The Australian aboriginal
connection with bees and
honey stretches back
easily more than 30,000
years and e...
10000 yrs Ago
• The earliest records of
humans eating honey
(and wax), are believed
to date back 10,000
year
10000 yrs ago
• -Hives have been in
existence since
Palaeolithic times, about
10,000 years (as depicted
in early rock pain...
9000 yrs ago
• There’s no denying it:
we’re in a long-term
relationship… with bees.
Recent evidence
published in the
journ...
9000 yrs ago
• Archaeologists have
found evidence on
pottery that people
were using honeycomb
at least 9,000 years ago.
9000 yrs ago
• Beekeeping may go
back to the early years
of agriculture, up to
9,000 years ago
.Archaeologists have
found ...
8500 yrs Ago
• Residue scraped from
pottery shows humans
used bee products as
long as 8,500 years ago
8000 yrs ago
• Honey is as old as history is
itself. One of the earliest
evidence of honey
harvesting is on a rock
paintin...
7000 yrs ago
• This has been indicated
in prehistoric drawings
found in caves, whilst
drawings found in Spain
and believed...
4000 yrs ago
• We have more than
4,000 years of recorded
use of honey as
medicine from the
ancient world to the
present. I...
4000 yrs ago
• If we journey back 4000
years to ancient Egypt,
hieroglyphics show the
story of the bee’s life.
So primitiv...
3000 yrs ago
• Recently discovered
beehives from ancient
Israel 3,000 years ago
appear to be the oldest
evidence for
beeke...
3000 yrs ago
• The hives have a small hole
on one side for the bees to
come and go, and on the
other side is a lid for the...
3000 yrs ago
• Overall, the findings
"suggest that
beekeeping already was
an elaborate
agricultural practice
in Israel 3,0...
3000 yrs go
• Then, three years ago,
researchers found a 3,000-year-
old apiary in the Iron Age city of
Tel Rehov in the J...
8000-6000 BC
• They wrote that they
don’t know when or
where the people first
started using the
honeybee , though they
not...
8000 BC
• Goddess wearing a
beehive as a tiara
Hacilar, ancient Turkey
circa 8000 BCE. This is
the origin on the
beehive s...
7000 BC
• Ancient Egyptians
bestowed their pharaohs
the title "Bee King"
(among others), thanks to
the extensive beekeepin...
7000 BC
• The oldest evidence they
found dates back to 7,000
B.C. in Anatolia, or Asia
Minor. One Stone Age site
in southe...
7000 BC
• where it was mentioned
in Sumerian and
Babylonian cuneiform
writings, the Hittite code,
and the sacred writings ...
6000 BC
• Gathering honey from wild
bee colonies dates even
further back—with some of
the earliest evidence
recorded in a ...
5500 BC-5000 BC
• The team found abundant
evidence for humans
using honeybee products
in the Balkans, dating
from roughly ...
Spain,
4500BC
4000 BC
• It is not entirely clear but
about 4000 BC, the
Egyptians started keeping
bees in a cylinder of
unbaked hardened...
3000 BC
• The ancient Egyptians
used honey as a wound
treatment as early as
3000 BC and it has been
found in Egyptian
tombs
2700 BC
• The first records (2700
BC) of the pharmaceutical
and nutritional value of
honey were found in
Mesopotamia, the
...
2500 BC
• Egyptian wall paintings
and reliefs dating to
about 2500 BC illustrate
the beekeeping process,
Kritsky said.
•
2400 BC
•
Relief from the Temple
of the Sun (Ne-user-re,
Abu Ghorab). Egypt
2400 BC.
From: Eva Crane. The
World History of...
2400 BC
• The earliest record of
keeping bees in hives
was found in the sun
temple erected in 2400
BC near Cairo.
2100 BC
• Exactly how long honey
has been in existence is
hard to say because it
has been around since
as far back as we c...
2060-1786 BC
• It seems that its use
was originally a royal
privilege and its use and
commerce spread to
the general popul...
2000-1100 BC
• In ancient Egyptian
poetry honey was used
also as a symbol of love.
In the few poems
written between 1100
a...
1700 BC
• Honey bees were
regarded as mother
Goddesses (see link
below) as one of a
series of identical
plaques recovered ...
The Beekeepers, 1568 BC by Pieter
Bruegel the Elder
1500 BC
• Knosis Crete 1500 BCE. The
importance of bee-keeping to the
Minoans is documented in the Linear
A hieroglyphs, w...
1500 BC
• The tombs at Mycenae
were shaped as
beehives, as was the
omphalos at Delphi in
Classical Greece, where
Apollo ru...
1500-1000 BC
• In ancient India honey
was worshiped in many
scriptures. In the Vedas,
created 1000-1500 BC
we find in the ...
1450 BC
• 1450 BC .Some of the
great jars, or pithoi, found
at Knossos were used to
store honey.
• The Greeks modified the...
1450 BC
• Gold seal ring, c. 1450
BC. From a tomb at
Isopata, near Knossos.
•
1350 BC
• Anaylsis of the contents of a hive
found in a 19th Dynasty grave
(1350 BC) in Thebes (Deir el-
Medineh) revealed...
1000-900 BC
• The researchers found
three rows of these
hives in a courtyard that
used to be part of a
large architectural...
920 BC
• But historical records
indicate that the city was
captured by an Egyptian
pharaoh about 920 BC
and its heavy indu...
800 BC
• Homer is the first Greek
poet, he wrote his
works aroung 800 BC.
In his Hymn to Hermes
he writes about the bee
pr...
771 BC
• However, the Chinese
went ahead the rest of
the world in terms of
collecting, preserving and
consuming honey, as ...
700 BC
• <<< This painting depicts
the Buddha while living in
the deep forest, where no
people were around who
could suppo...
700 BC
• Bee Coin from Sicily 700
BCE.
•
Egypt
660BC
600-300 BC
• According to the book
‘Bee’ by Claire Preston,
the Picts (iron age
people from Northern
Scotland, UK), were
m...
600-140 BC
• In Greece, during the
“golden age” (600-140
B.C.), bees were studied
for their own interest
rather than their...
582-485 BC
• The poem about Eros and
the bees is attritubuted
to Anacreon 582 BC-485
BC.
• Anacreon (/əˈnækriən/; Gre
ek: ...
570-495 BC
• Pythagoras of Samos
(c.570-495 BCE)
• Describes about Honey
as a Food
Greeks
• 384 BC, Aristotle wrote
much about
beekeeping.
• Foulbrood
• First to note that
honeybee's don't visit
flowers of...
384-322 BC
• Aristotle’s Natural
History (344-342 B.C.)
contains a variety of
direct observations on
honey and bees. The
I...
256 BC
• hus, in the year 256 BCE a
beehive owner named
Senchons wanted her
donkey returned to her, so
that she could move...
247-181 BC
• The Romans used
honey to heal their
wounds after battles.
Hannibal, a great
warrior gave his army
honey and v...
200 BC
• Aristophanes of Byzantium,
the head of the library at
Alexandria around 200 BCE,
claimed, that the
beekeepers app...
64-24 AD
• Strabo (64 BC–24 AD)
considered honey as one
of the prominent
products of “Arabia Felix”,
indicating in
his Geo...
40 BC
• Virgil wrote about beekeeping in
about 40BC
• Keep hives:
– Near water
– Out of the wind
– Away for lizards, moths...
50 AD
• Democritus, a contemporary
of Hippocrates, thought a diet
including honey led to a longer
life. Honey was used by ...
50 AD
• Pliny wrote about
beekeeping in about
50AD.
• Wrote about wax, and
propolis
• Described a transparent
(Observation...
79 AD
• Blinos (79 AD) noted
that, “Arabia Felix
wealth outperformed
the whole world, as its
lands had perfumed
jungles, g...
400 AD
• -Early European manuscripts (the earliest
dating around A.D. 400) describe honey as
used for food, drink, medicin...
571-632 AD
• -In the Middle East, the Arabs, with their Muslim
religion (founded by Muhammad the Prophet, A.D.
571-632), b...
• The reasons these foods were so important
around holidays of religious significance were
several, including a belief in ...
854-932 AD
• The Persian physician Al-Razi
advised using a mixture of
honey and vinegar as a
remedy for skin conditions,
b...
1000 AD
• During the 10 century,
the Kings and Queens of
England had fermented
honey wine (Mead), the
Edmeades family
prod...
1532 AD
• 1538 – Spanish import
the first European
honey bees to South
America.
1600 AD
• Honey bees are thought
to originate in Africa,
and were actually
brought to North
America by European
colonists ...
1600 AD
• Although experts argue
whether the honeybee is
native to the Americas,
conquering Spaniards in
1600 A.D. found n...
1600-1700 AD
• The bees in the United
States were brought here
when EuropeansEuropeans:
people from
Europe migrated here i...
1622 AD
• Apis mellifera mellifera
• Called variably the
German black bee or
north European bee,
this race is thought to
b...
1682 AD
• 1682 – George Wheler –
an English clergyman
and travel writer,
discovers and describes
Greek hives (forerunner
o...
1700 AD
• 1700 – Again according to
the book “Bee” above,
written by Claire Preston, it
wasn’t until 1700 that it was
unde...
1789 AD
• The Leaf Hive, invented
in Switzerland in 1789
by Francis Huber, was a
fully movable frame
hive. The combs in th...
1750-1831 AD
• In 1792 a blind
naturalist,
FrancoisHuber,
published a book in
Geneva on bees and
honey. The honey
industry...
Francis Huber
• Fully movable frame, Leaf, hive 1789
• Observations on Bees
• Queen mating practices and role of Drones
1800 AD
• It took until the 1800s for
the beekeeper Lorenzo
Langstroth to invent a bee
hive that allowed for easy
hive man...
1804 AD
• Napoleon used the bee as
a symbol of his empire
after his coronation in
1804. It stood for
industry, efficiency ...
1820-22 AD
• In the early 1820’s the
honeybee was brought
to Australia aboard the
ship Isabella.
• -Honey bees were
introd...
1831 AD
• -European bees were
successfully introduced
to Tasmania in the
1831.
•
Rev. Lorenzo
Lorraine
Langstroth
(1810 – 1895)
“Father of American Beekeeping”
Andover, MA 1836
- 1847
1838 AD
• 1838 - Johann Dzierzon, a
Polish apiculturist,
devised the first practical
movable-comb beehive,
which allowed
m...
1850 AD
• By 1850, honey was
being produced by bees
and harvested by man,
over almost the whole
world. At this time, the
m...
1851 AD
• The straw skep became the
norm for more than a
millennium, until humans
discovered that a simple
wooden box also...
1851 AD
• 1851 – L.L. Langstroth of
Philadelphia USA – the
"father of American
beekeeping had access to
translations of Dz...
1890 AD
• 1890 – William
Broughton Carr, English
inventor and beekeeper,
invented the WBC
beehive (pictured left).
Learn m...
1900 AD
• By the year 1900, most
modern beekeepers
were using variants of
the Langstroth hive with
Hoffman-style frame,
li...
Brother Adam 1898 - 1996
1914 AD
• Osip Mandelstam,
Russian writer, 1914
•
1891-1938, a famous
Russian poet, wrote a
beaitiful poem about
joy and t...
1920 AD
• 1852-1933, famous
American poet and
clergyman, wrote a beatiful
poem on the bees.
• Henry Jackson van
Dyke(Novem...
Albert Einstein during a lecture in
Vienna in 1921 AD
1925 – Brother Adam
Breeding Honeybees for certain traits:
the Buckfast Bee
• Good Temper
• Disease-Resistance
• Prolific
...
1948 AD
• 1948 - Abbé Warré
published “Beekeeping
For All” (opens new
window).In the book he
outlines plans for a a top
ba...
1984 AD
• In 1984, a backstage worker
at the Paris opera
established one of the most
unusually sited beehives on
the roof ...
World Honey Exporters
2014 AD
• Natural honey exports
by country during 2014
totaled US$2.3 billion
up by an overall 54.1%
for all natural honey...
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan
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History of honey in world A Research Report By Mr Allah dad khan

  1. 1. History of Honey/ Honey bees in World A Report By Mr.Allah Dad Khan
  2. 2. 150 million years • Firstly, opinions vary about how long honey bees have been around on the planet: some sources state that fossilized remains of honey bees dating back 150 million years.
  3. 3. 100m years ago • The latest bee find, one preserved in amber found in Myanmar (Burma), now dates bees to an estimated 100 million years ago, during the Cretaceous. This is the time of dinosaurs, and makes bees even older than Australia. (These were solitary, non-social bees.) •
  4. 4. 96-74 million yrs ago • The oldest known fossil bee, a stingless bee named Trigona prisca, was found in the Upper Cretaceous of New Jersey,U.S.A. and dates from 96 to 74 million years ago.
  5. 5. 65m yrs Ago • The honey bee first appeared on our planet in the Tertiary period at the beginning of the Cenozoic era, that is 65 million years ago - much earlier that the appearance of humans. If we assume that honey appeared together with bees, we can conclude that until almost the 16th century after Christ, honey was the only naturally sweet food in the "known" world. •
  6. 6. 40 million yrs ago • Dating back to over 40 million years before the evolution of man, Honey is the oldest sweetener existent in the world
  7. 7. 20-10 million yrs ago • -Honey-storing social bees developed during the Miocene, between 20-10 million years ago. These bees made their nests in hollow trees, caves, crevices, rocks and holes in the ground. •
  8. 8. Australopithicus, 4M BC
  9. 9. 2.5 million yrs ago • Anthropologists have suggested early Homo was a meat- and-potatoes kind of hominid. Starting roughly 2.5 million years ago, early species of Homo were the first hominids to have brains bigger than an ape’s.
  10. 10. 300000 yrs ago • Researchers at the Uppsala University used genomic analysis to decode evolutionary history of honeybees. The team said that the honeybee (Apis mellifera) came from an ancient lineage of bees that lived in cavities. These ancient bees came from Asia around 300,000 years ago and spread to Europe and Africa. The study challenges the idea that honeybees originated from Africa. •
  11. 11. 100000 yrs Ago • Honey was the most important sweetener for food and alcoholic drinks in ancient times. So important were these activities that parents named their children after the bees. Both Deborah and Melissa mean "bee", in Hebrew and Greek respectively. It has been sought as an antiseptic and sweetener for at least 100,000 years.
  12. 12. 130000yrs ago • Neanderthal • Neanderthals had a higher volume to surface ratio, with shorter legs and a bigger body, compared to Homo sapiensbecause they inhabited higher latitudes, in conformance withBergmann's rule, and their larger stature explains their larger brain size because brain size
  13. 13. 30000 yrsago • The Australian aboriginal connection with bees and honey stretches back easily more than 30,000 years and examples of Aboriginal art in the form of rock paintings as well as carved images on eucalyptus bark portray beehives and men with bags of honey over their shoulders.
  14. 14. 10000 yrs Ago • The earliest records of humans eating honey (and wax), are believed to date back 10,000 year
  15. 15. 10000 yrs ago • -Hives have been in existence since Palaeolithic times, about 10,000 years (as depicted in early rock paintings in a Spanish cave in Valencia, in which a ladder was used to reach the nest and a container was used to hold the honey combs). •
  16. 16. 9000 yrs ago • There’s no denying it: we’re in a long-term relationship… with bees. Recent evidence published in the journal Nature shows that humans have been depending on honey bees for about 9,000 years. •
  17. 17. 9000 yrs ago • Archaeologists have found evidence on pottery that people were using honeycomb at least 9,000 years ago.
  18. 18. 9000 yrs ago • Beekeeping may go back to the early years of agriculture, up to 9,000 years ago .Archaeologists have found evidence on pottery that people were using honeycomb at least 9000 years ago.
  19. 19. 8500 yrs Ago • Residue scraped from pottery shows humans used bee products as long as 8,500 years ago
  20. 20. 8000 yrs ago • Honey is as old as history is itself. One of the earliest evidence of honey harvesting is on a rock painting dating back 8000 years, this one found in Valencia, Spain shows a honey seeker robbing a wild bee colony. The bees were subdued with smoke and the tree or rocks opened resulting in destruction of the colony.
  21. 21. 7000 yrs ago • This has been indicated in prehistoric drawings found in caves, whilst drawings found in Spain and believed to be around 7,000 years old, appear to indicate a form of beekeeping.
  22. 22. 4000 yrs ago • We have more than 4,000 years of recorded use of honey as medicine from the ancient world to the present. It has even been successfully used as battlefield medicine from the time of The Iliad to as recently as World War I.
  23. 23. 4000 yrs ago • If we journey back 4000 years to ancient Egypt, hieroglyphics show the story of the bee’s life. So primitive man had discovered the delight of honey by then — for centuries it was the only sweetener available
  24. 24. 3000 yrs ago • Recently discovered beehives from ancient Israel 3,000 years ago appear to be the oldest evidence for beekeeping ever found, scientists reported. •
  25. 25. 3000 yrs ago • The hives have a small hole on one side for the bees to come and go, and on the other side is a lid for the beekeeper to use to access the honeycomb. The archeologists used carbon dating on grains that had spilled from a broken storage jar next to the hives to estimate that they were about 3,000 years old. •
  26. 26. 3000 yrs ago • Overall, the findings "suggest that beekeeping already was an elaborate agricultural practice in Israel 3,000 years ago,
  27. 27. 3000 yrs go • Then, three years ago, researchers found a 3,000-year- old apiary in the Iron Age city of Tel Rehov in the Jordan Valley, the oldest known commercial beekeeping facility in the world, suggesting that the word "honey" likely referred to the real thing. Now the same researchers have gotten an even bigger surprise: The bees that were kept in the hives were most likely from Turkey, hundreds of miles away. •
  28. 28. 8000-6000 BC • They wrote that they don’t know when or where the people first started using the honeybee , though they noted there is an example of rock art from 6,000 to 8,000 years old in Spain showing a person apparently harvesting wild honey from a tree.
  29. 29. 8000 BC • Goddess wearing a beehive as a tiara Hacilar, ancient Turkey circa 8000 BCE. This is the origin on the beehive shaped Mitre of the Cohen Priests. •
  30. 30. 7000 BC • Ancient Egyptians bestowed their pharaohs the title "Bee King" (among others), thanks to the extensive beekeeping in Lower Egypt that kept the land flowing with honey. Images in tombs show cylindrical hives dating as far back as the 7th century B.C.
  31. 31. 7000 BC • The oldest evidence they found dates back to 7,000 B.C. in Anatolia, or Asia Minor. One Stone Age site in southeastern Turkey called Çayönü Tepesi, yielded exceptionally well-preserved beeswax residue from that time period, according to the paper.
  32. 32. 7000 BC • where it was mentioned in Sumerian and Babylonian cuneiform writings, the Hittite code, and the sacred writings of India and Egypt. It is presumably even older than that. Cave paintings in Spain from 7000BC show the earliest records of beekeeping.
  33. 33. 6000 BC • Gathering honey from wild bee colonies dates even further back—with some of the earliest evidence recorded in a rock painting from around 6,000 B.C. in Valencia, Spain that depicts a honey hunter raiding a hive. Yet how common and widespread this practice was remained unclear, until now, according to a new study published today in the journal Nature.
  34. 34. 5500 BC-5000 BC • The team found abundant evidence for humans using honeybee products in the Balkans, dating from roughly 5,500 B.C. to 4,500 B.C. and from North Africa from 5,000 B.C. The farthest north the researchers were able to find wax residues was Denmark.
  35. 35. Spain, 4500BC
  36. 36. 4000 BC • It is not entirely clear but about 4000 BC, the Egyptians started keeping bees in a cylinder of unbaked hardened mud pots, stacking them in rows to form a bank. Some beekeepers in Egypt moved their hives on rafts down the Nile, following the blossoms.
  37. 37. 3000 BC • The ancient Egyptians used honey as a wound treatment as early as 3000 BC and it has been found in Egyptian tombs
  38. 38. 2700 BC • The first records (2700 BC) of the pharmaceutical and nutritional value of honey were found in Mesopotamia, the birthplace of the first organized communities. •
  39. 39. 2500 BC • Egyptian wall paintings and reliefs dating to about 2500 BC illustrate the beekeeping process, Kritsky said. •
  40. 40. 2400 BC • Relief from the Temple of the Sun (Ne-user-re, Abu Ghorab). Egypt 2400 BC. From: Eva Crane. The World History of Beekeeping and Honey Hunting
  41. 41. 2400 BC • The earliest record of keeping bees in hives was found in the sun temple erected in 2400 BC near Cairo.
  42. 42. 2100 BC • Exactly how long honey has been in existence is hard to say because it has been around since as far back as we can record. Honey is as old as written history, dating back to 2100 B.C. •
  43. 43. 2060-1786 BC • It seems that its use was originally a royal privilege and its use and commerce spread to the general population only after the Middle Dynasty (2060-1786 BC)
  44. 44. 2000-1100 BC • In ancient Egyptian poetry honey was used also as a symbol of love. In the few poems written between 1100 and 2000 BC and transmitted into our times honey is mentioned twice.
  45. 45. 1700 BC • Honey bees were regarded as mother Goddesses (see link below) as one of a series of identical plaques recovered at Camiros in Rhodes dating from the archaic period of Greek art in the seventh century BC shows.
  46. 46. The Beekeepers, 1568 BC by Pieter Bruegel the Elder
  47. 47. 1500 BC • Knosis Crete 1500 BCE. The importance of bee-keeping to the Minoans is documented in the Linear A hieroglyphs, where there are already drawings of actual beehives, testifying to a long history probably going back to the Neolithic era. The onyx gem from Knossos shows the Bee Goddess bearing upon her head the bull’s horns with the double axe inside their curve. The dogs – later the dogs of the underworld belonging to Hecate and Artemis – are winged and flying so close to the Goddess that their wings, at first glance, appear as hers. •
  48. 48. 1500 BC • The tombs at Mycenae were shaped as beehives, as was the omphalos at Delphi in Classical Greece, where Apollo ruled with his chief oracular Priestess, the Pythia, who was called the Delphic Bee.
  49. 49. 1500-1000 BC • In ancient India honey was worshiped in many scriptures. In the Vedas, created 1000-1500 BC we find in the Rig Veda
  50. 50. 1450 BC • 1450 BC .Some of the great jars, or pithoi, found at Knossos were used to store honey. • The Greeks modified the Egyptian design baking the mud into a sturdier terra cotta. (1450BC). They called the honey "nectar from the gods".
  51. 51. 1450 BC • Gold seal ring, c. 1450 BC. From a tomb at Isopata, near Knossos. •
  52. 52. 1350 BC • Anaylsis of the contents of a hive found in a 19th Dynasty grave (1350 BC) in Thebes (Deir el- Medineh) revealed pollen grains, which aided in the estimation of the degree of change in the honey-producing plants over time. During this period, the Egyptians placed hives on ships travelling Nile, in search of flowering plants. In other words, we have the first attempt at nomadic bee-keeping. The hunt for "wild" honey was very popular and was protected by the King's army.
  53. 53. 1000-900 BC • The researchers found three rows of these hives in a courtyard that used to be part of a large architectural complex during the 10th to 9th centuries B.C. •
  54. 54. 920 BC • But historical records indicate that the city was captured by an Egyptian pharaoh about 920 BC and its heavy industry destroyed. That time frame is close to the radiocarbon date for the bees, "so perhaps a raid by the Egyptian army caused this," Mazar said.
  55. 55. 800 BC • Homer is the first Greek poet, he wrote his works aroung 800 BC. In his Hymn to Hermes he writes about the bee priestesses Melissae, here in the translation of Miss Jane Harrison
  56. 56. 771 BC • However, the Chinese went ahead the rest of the world in terms of collecting, preserving and consuming honey, as they were the ones to begin beekeeping while the rest of the world searched for bee nests to procure honey as early as 771 BCE itself.
  57. 57. 700 BC • <<< This painting depicts the Buddha while living in the deep forest, where no people were around who could support him by offering food. The monkey then gave the Buddha some honey. Other animal also gave him various foodstuffs. Picture of a wallpainting in a monastery in Laos •
  58. 58. 700 BC • Bee Coin from Sicily 700 BCE. •
  59. 59. Egypt 660BC
  60. 60. 600-300 BC • According to the book ‘Bee’ by Claire Preston, the Picts (iron age people from Northern Scotland, UK), were making honey ale between 300 – 600 BC. •
  61. 61. 600-140 BC • In Greece, during the “golden age” (600-140 B.C.), bees were studied for their own interest rather than their exploitation
  62. 62. 582-485 BC • The poem about Eros and the bees is attritubuted to Anacreon 582 BC-485 BC. • Anacreon (/əˈnækriən/; Gre ek: Ἀνακρέων ὁ Τήϊος; c. 582 – c. 485 BC) was aGreek lyric poet, notable for his drinking songs and hymns. Later Greeks included him in the canonical list of nine lyric poets.
  63. 63. 570-495 BC • Pythagoras of Samos (c.570-495 BCE) • Describes about Honey as a Food
  64. 64. Greeks • 384 BC, Aristotle wrote much about beekeeping. • Foulbrood • First to note that honeybee's don't visit flowers of different kinds on one flight, but remain constant to one species.
  65. 65. 384-322 BC • Aristotle’s Natural History (344-342 B.C.) contains a variety of direct observations on honey and bees. The Iliad and the Odyssey make many references to honey.
  66. 66. 256 BC • hus, in the year 256 BCE a beehive owner named Senchons wanted her donkey returned to her, so that she could move her hives into the pastures.[Sometimes the hives had to be transported to higher lying land, to prevent them from being destroyed in the annual Nile inundation, as the so-called bee-keepers' petition dating from the middle of the third century
  67. 67. 247-181 BC • The Romans used honey to heal their wounds after battles. Hannibal, a great warrior gave his army honey and vinegar as they crossed the alps on elephants to battle Rome.
  68. 68. 200 BC • Aristophanes of Byzantium, the head of the library at Alexandria around 200 BCE, claimed, that the beekeepers approached the hives with shaven heads, as the bees reacted very violently to the smell of perfumed oil applied to the hair.[14]Apiarists are never shown using protective gear and relied on smoke blown into the hives to keep the bees peaceful. • Aristophanes, of Byzantium, librarian of Alexandria (1), c. 257–180 BCE •
  69. 69. 64-24 AD • Strabo (64 BC–24 AD) considered honey as one of the prominent products of “Arabia Felix”, indicating in his Geographica, “the far western parts, towards Ethiopia, were irrigated by summer rainfall and cultivated twice a year, and honey was one of its numerous yields and was enormously abundan
  70. 70. 40 BC • Virgil wrote about beekeeping in about 40BC • Keep hives: – Near water – Out of the wind – Away for lizards, moths, and birds • Emphasized the hives ruler • Praised Bees for their abstension from Sexual intercourse • Spontaneous Generation?
  71. 71. 50 AD • Democritus, a contemporary of Hippocrates, thought a diet including honey led to a longer life. Honey was used by the ancient Greek physician Dioscorides (50 AD) for sunburn and infected wounds, as well as for coughs and for poisoning by toadstools, snakes and rabid dogs. Rather ironically, the Ancient Romans used honey medicinally as both a laxative and a cure for diarrhoea.
  72. 72. 50 AD • Pliny wrote about beekeeping in about 50AD. • Wrote about wax, and propolis • Described a transparent (Observation) hive • The Mead consumed by the Celts! • “Bees are the smallest of birds, and are born from the bodies of oxen”
  73. 73. 79 AD • Blinos (79 AD) noted that, “Arabia Felix wealth outperformed the whole world, as its lands had perfumed jungles, gold mines, irrigating water and produced a lot of honey and wax”
  74. 74. 400 AD • -Early European manuscripts (the earliest dating around A.D. 400) describe honey as used for food, drink, medicinal, various preservative purposes, and in magico-religious rites
  75. 75. 571-632 AD • -In the Middle East, the Arabs, with their Muslim religion (founded by Muhammad the Prophet, A.D. 571-632), built a vast empire which included Northern Africa, Spain and eastwards beyond what is now Iran. An Arab writer (Ibn Magih) quotes Muhammad as saying, “Honey is a remedy for every illness, and the Koran is a remedy for all illnesses of the mind, therefore I recommend to you both remedies, the Koran and honey.” •
  76. 76. • The reasons these foods were so important around holidays of religious significance were several, including a belief in the medicinal properties of honey. When a bowl of casīda is eaten in celebration of the Prophet’s birthday, it reminds the believer that the holy Koran was recited to Muhammad by the angel Gabriel near Mecca in 610 A. D
  77. 77. 854-932 AD • The Persian physician Al-Razi advised using a mixture of honey and vinegar as a remedy for skin conditions, but also for gum disease. This advice has now been proven to hold some merit as recent studies suggest that the natural antibacterial properties of honey halt the growth of bacteria in the mouth and potentially even prevent gingivitis. • Abūbakr-e Mohammad-e Zakariyyā-ye Rāzī Persian: ‫رازى‬ ‫زکرياى‬ ‫د‬ّ‫م‬‫مح‬ ‫ابوبكر‬
  78. 78. 1000 AD • During the 10 century, the Kings and Queens of England had fermented honey wine (Mead), the Edmeades family produced some of these. •
  79. 79. 1532 AD • 1538 – Spanish import the first European honey bees to South America.
  80. 80. 1600 AD • Honey bees are thought to originate in Africa, and were actually brought to North America by European colonists in the early 1600s
  81. 81. 1600 AD • Although experts argue whether the honeybee is native to the Americas, conquering Spaniards in 1600 A.D. found native Mexicans and Central Americans had already developed beekeeping methods to produce honey. •
  82. 82. 1600-1700 AD • The bees in the United States were brought here when EuropeansEuropeans: people from Europe migrated here in the 1600s and 1700s. Honey bees and bumblebees are probably the best known. Bees are a very beneficial insect that are necessary for the pollination of many plants. •
  83. 83. 1622 AD • Apis mellifera mellifera • Called variably the German black bee or north European bee, this race is thought to be the first to make landfall in North America , most likely in the year 1622 on the coat of virginia.
  84. 84. 1682 AD • 1682 – George Wheler – an English clergyman and travel writer, discovers and describes Greek hives (forerunner of modern hives with movable frames).
  85. 85. 1700 AD • 1700 – Again according to the book “Bee” above, written by Claire Preston, it wasn’t until 1700 that it was understood bees gather nectar from flowers with which honey is made. Prior to this time, it was thought the honey was collected by the bees ready-made in the flowers! •
  86. 86. 1789 AD • The Leaf Hive, invented in Switzerland in 1789 by Francis Huber, was a fully movable frame hive. The combs in this hive were examined like pages in a book. A.I. Root and E.R. Root credit Huber with inventing the first movable framehive.
  87. 87. 1750-1831 AD • In 1792 a blind naturalist, FrancoisHuber, published a book in Geneva on bees and honey. The honey industry that we know today began to grow
  88. 88. Francis Huber • Fully movable frame, Leaf, hive 1789 • Observations on Bees • Queen mating practices and role of Drones
  89. 89. 1800 AD • It took until the 1800s for the beekeeper Lorenzo Langstroth to invent a bee hive that allowed for easy hive manipulation and removal of honey – which is the same bee hive model we use today. •
  90. 90. 1804 AD • Napoleon used the bee as a symbol of his empire after his coronation in 1804. It stood for industry, efficiency and productivity. Also emblematic of immortality and resurrection, the bee was chosen to link the new dynasty to the very origins of France
  91. 91. 1820-22 AD • In the early 1820’s the honeybee was brought to Australia aboard the ship Isabella. • -Honey bees were introduced to Australia in 1822. •
  92. 92. 1831 AD • -European bees were successfully introduced to Tasmania in the 1831. •
  93. 93. Rev. Lorenzo Lorraine Langstroth (1810 – 1895) “Father of American Beekeeping” Andover, MA 1836 - 1847
  94. 94. 1838 AD • 1838 - Johann Dzierzon, a Polish apiculturist, devised the first practical movable-comb beehive, which allowed manipulation of individual honeycombs without destroying the structure of the hive. Dzierzon discovered the phenomenon of parthenogenesis in bees .
  95. 95. 1850 AD • By 1850, honey was being produced by bees and harvested by man, over almost the whole world. At this time, the modern movable-frame hive was invented, and its use became widely spread.
  96. 96. 1851 AD • The straw skep became the norm for more than a millennium, until humans discovered that a simple wooden box also would work, as long as it had an opening that the bees could use as an entrance. Some of the earliest box hives were octagonal, to mimic the shape of a hollow tree, but square wooden hive boxes soon prevailed. The moveable frame hive now in use was developed in 1851
  97. 97. 1851 AD • 1851 – L.L. Langstroth of Philadelphia USA – the "father of American beekeeping had access to translations of Dzierzon's works., built upon the design of Dzierzon, and others (such as Francis Huber of Switzerland), and designed a completely movable frame hive
  98. 98. 1890 AD • 1890 – William Broughton Carr, English inventor and beekeeper, invented the WBC beehive (pictured left). Learn more about the different types ofhoney bee hives.
  99. 99. 1900 AD • By the year 1900, most modern beekeepers were using variants of the Langstroth hive with Hoffman-style frame, like the ones used today.
  100. 100. Brother Adam 1898 - 1996
  101. 101. 1914 AD • Osip Mandelstam, Russian writer, 1914 • 1891-1938, a famous Russian poet, wrote a beaitiful poem about joy and the honey bee:
  102. 102. 1920 AD • 1852-1933, famous American poet and clergyman, wrote a beatiful poem on the bees. • Henry Jackson van Dyke(November 10, 1852 – April 10, 1933) was an American author, educator, and clergyman.[1] • • Henry Jackson van Dyke(November 10, 1852 – April 10, 1933) was an American author, educator, and clergyman.[1] •
  103. 103. Albert Einstein during a lecture in Vienna in 1921 AD
  104. 104. 1925 – Brother Adam Breeding Honeybees for certain traits: the Buckfast Bee • Good Temper • Disease-Resistance • Prolific • Propensity for hard work • Disinclination to swarm
  105. 105. 1948 AD • 1948 - Abbé Warré published “Beekeeping For All” (opens new window).In the book he outlines plans for a a top bar bee hive. Warré also advocates far less interference with hives and bees. Read more about this and aboutNatural Beekeeping. •
  106. 106. 1984 AD • In 1984, a backstage worker at the Paris opera established one of the most unusually sited beehives on the roof of the opera house. The "opera bees" gather their nectar as they visit flowers all over the city of Paris. The fruits of their labors are on sale in the souvenir shop of the opera. •
  107. 107. World Honey Exporters
  108. 108. 2014 AD • Natural honey exports by country during 2014 totaled US$2.3 billion up by an overall 54.1% for all natural honey shippers over the five- year period starting in 2010. The value of global natural honey exports gained 10.8% from 2013 to 2014

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