BUSINESS SCHOOL



MSc INTERNATIONAL MARKETING
PROGRAMME HANDBOOK




SESSION 2007 - 2008
This booklet is available electr...
CONTENT
Message from the Programme Leader                          2


Course Specific Information                        ...
WELCOME FROM THE PROGRAMME LEADER

The PgD/MSc International Marketing is a challenging course that provides graduates of ...
COURSE SPECIFIC INFORMATION
Teaching Staff

The Marketing Enterprise and Tourism Division has around 20 teaching staff. Th...
Programme Management
The course is managed under the auspices of the Marketing Learning and Teaching Committee (LTC)
that ...
Delivery Of Teaching

The aim of class contact is to provide you with a framework around which you can direct your reading...
Students also need to develop the skills necessary to critique academic papers as this is a most useful skill
when underta...
MARKM012 and MARKM017 PLUS two other modules
                 Management in the Business Organisation (BUSNM003)          ...
BUSNM003 – MANAGEMENT IN THE BUSINESS ORGANISATION


MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Ms Mairi Gudim                                   ...
MARKM001 – MARKETING PRACTICE

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Ms Jacqui Greener                                      CREDIT:    15.0
...
MARKM005 – INTERNATIONAL AND GLOBAL MARKETING

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Mohammed Boussouara                                 ...
MARKM006 – STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Declan Bannon                                     CREDIT...
MARKM010 – MSc PROJECT (MARKETING)

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Pravin Balaraman                                  CREDIT:     6...
MARKM012 – MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:              Mr Russell Campbell                             CRE...
MARKM017 – RESEARCH METHODS

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:             Mr David Moyes                                     CREDIT:  ...
Optional Module

                                CATEM001 – INTERNATIONAL TOURISM
MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:              Mrs Si...
•   105 hours of self study

                                             Optional Module

              MARK4009 – BUSINE...
16
Optional Module

                      MARK4014 – PRODUCT POLICY AND INNOVATION

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:             Mr Geoff...
Optional Module

                 MARKM016 – INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT

MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:              Professo...
Grading System

Grade   Numerical     Definition         Descriptor
        range (%)
A       70-100        Excellent     ...
You will find the 1st and 2nd semester timetables are included in this handbook. Please
note that class times and rooms ma...
International Marketing.doc.doc
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International Marketing.doc.doc

  1. 1. BUSINESS SCHOOL MSc INTERNATIONAL MARKETING PROGRAMME HANDBOOK SESSION 2007 - 2008 This booklet is available electronically or in alternative formats on request
  2. 2. CONTENT Message from the Programme Leader 2 Course Specific Information 3 Teaching Staff 3 Programme Management 4 Programme Aims 4 Programme Structure 4 Teaching Methods 5 Assessment 6 Progression/Award Statement 6 Note on MSc Dissertations 6 What Do I Study… 7 Short Module Descriptors 7 Core Modules BUSNM003 Management in the Business Organisation 8 MARKM001 Marketing Practice 9 MARKM005 International & Global Marketing 10 MARKM006 Strategic Marketing Management 11 MARKM010 MSc Project (International Marketing) 12 MARKM012 Marketing Communications 13 MARKM017 Research Methods 14 Optional Modules CATEM001 International Tourism 15 MARK4009 Business to Business Marketing Strategy 16 MARK4014 Product Policy & Innovation 17 MARKM016 International Business Management 18 Grading System 19 Progression Requirements 19 Timetables 19 1
  3. 3. WELCOME FROM THE PROGRAMME LEADER The PgD/MSc International Marketing is a challenging course that provides graduates of any discipline with a solid grounding in Marketing within a global context. The programme has been specially designed to address the current, cutting edge issues in Marketing, and as such, students on the course should be able to develop a range of skills necessary for participation in dynamic careers within international business. The PgD/MSc International Marketing programme is offered at the Business School and also part- time at the TEI Piraeus campus in Athens. As an entrant on the course at either campus, we would like to welcome you and would like to thank you for selecting this programme for your professional development. This booklet should be used in conjunction with the MSc handbook, where general regulations are explained. However, students should note that a minimum of 40% for each element of assessment in any of the taught modules (and an overall average of 50%) is required for transfer to MSc. The MSc programme requires the completion of a dissertation involving advanced theoretical, conceptual and applied material. The Diploma and MSc awards qualify for the maximum exemption for the examinations of the Chartered Institute of Marketing. We wish you good luck in your study, and if you need to discuss any element of the programme in more detail, please feel free to contact me or other members of the teaching staff. Russell Campbell Programme Leader MSc International Marketing 2
  4. 4. COURSE SPECIFIC INFORMATION Teaching Staff The Marketing Enterprise and Tourism Division has around 20 teaching staff. The designations, room numbers and telephone extensions of the academic staff responsible for the administration and teaching of the MSc International Marketing are noted below: MSc International Marketing (Paisley campus) Current Teaching/Administration Staff NAME ROOM EXT Sandra Connor (Academic Director) E369 3359 Heather Anderson E339 3665 Pravin Balaraman F303 3149 Declan Bannon E370 3377 Mohammed Boussouara F304 3357 Andrew Burnett F303 3492 Russell Campbell F205 3499 Paul Coleshill B221 3383 Siobhan Drummond F306 3668 Meg Dunn E358 3373 Mairi Gudim E368 3358 David Moyes 01387 702076 Thandiwe Mtetwa E327 3871 Geoff Whittam E325 3368 Valerie Will E357 3366 What Can This Programme Do For Me? By choosing to study for the PgD/MSc in International Marketing you have opted for an interesting and challenging course of study in one of the fastest growing sectors of Higher Education. The MSc was first introduced at the University in 1988. To date some 19 cohorts of students are either currently undertaking the course or have graduated Postgraduate Diploma or MSc International Marketing. Some of these students have studied, or are studying, in a part time mode, and some in a full time mode. In 2001, this course was, for the first time, offered on a part-time basis at the TEI Piraeus campus in Athens, Greece. By graduating MSc International Marketing you will be armed with the necessary qualifications for positions in a wide range of marketing careers. 2
  5. 5. Programme Management The course is managed under the auspices of the Marketing Learning and Teaching Committee (LTC) that is constituted by the Business School. The committee provides advice, makes recommendations and reports to the Business School Board on all matters relating to the maintenance of academic standards and organisation in the programme of study for the Diploma and MSc. The LTC is responsible for keeping under review all aspects of the course in accordance with University procedures for the monitoring of courses and will have the powers and follow the procedures laid down in the University regulations. The current Course Director is Mr Russell Campbell. Programme Aims Postgraduate Diploma in Marketing The objective of the diploma element of the course is to produce Diplomates who are competent within the major areas of marketing. The development of competence is, according to the Management Charter Initiative, to develop "effective performance in the work situation which included evidence of underpinning knowledge and understanding". Thus the primary aims of the diploma element of the course are to: • Provide students with a good grasp of the major theoretical and conceptual tools of marketing • Enable students to apply these theoretical and conceptual tools to operational marketing situations MSc International Marketing The objective of the MSc element of the course is to produce postgraduates who demonstrate a high level of conceptual ability, involving in particular: • Sourcing and critical evaluation of complex data sets. • Synthesis, integration and critical evaluation of appropriate theoretical material: • The development and application of strategic thinking Programme Structure The course is modularised and semesterised. The full-time Postgraduate Diploma is taught within two 12- week semesters. The MSc requires an additional period. Thus, modules are taken in three distinct blocks, one for each semester, with the summer period used for beginning the MSc project. Most taught modules involve 36 class contact hours. This is made up of a three-hour teaching block each week for 12 weeks. All full-time students must take four modules in each semester: three modules are ‘core’ and one can be chosen from a number of available ‘options’. It should be noted that optional modules are available subject to resources. The MSc dissertation is completed over the summer period. Part-time students at the Paisley campus and the TEI Piraeus students, complete the course over 2 years, undertaking one half of the core and optional modules in each academic year. It is also recommended that they utilise the summer periods for dissertation work. Module examinations take place at the end of each semester period. The above-noted structure allows students to exit with an award on successful completion of a set group of modules. 3
  6. 6. Delivery Of Teaching The aim of class contact is to provide you with a framework around which you can direct your reading. You should find these sessions stimulating and enjoyable as they are designed to be interactive and your lecturers expect you to participate in the learning experience. Students will be given a timetable when they register. A master copy will also be posted on the MSc notice board. TEI Piraeus students will be furnished with a timetable by TEI Administration staff when they register for the course. Throughout the year, any necessary time or room changes will be announced at lectures but you should regularly check the master copy on the notice board. Module descriptors are included at the end of this handbook. Details of the content, teaching schedule, reading lists and assessment will be supplied at the first meeting of each individual module. You should also refer to Blackboard, the virtual learning environment to which the University subscribes. Teaching Methods The teaching methods adopted for the MSc International Marketing are a mix of traditional methods, group work and role-play. There is also an emphasis on action learning techniques to encourage students to take responsibility for their own learning. Thus, a large component of the course is a mixture of project work linked to group-based action learning sessions. This combines practical relevance with problem solving involving both academic expertise and peer group input (the essential ingredient of an action learning approach). The significance of the peer group is that it is a proven and powerful technique for inducing the fundamental attitudinal changes that are necessary to compel action for change by individuals. The concept of the combined project work and group learning is that of `learning by doing' in relation to an operational problem of current or immediate concern to students. The objectives of the project work are as follows: • To allow the student to gain experience in the use of overall analytical marketing techniques • To provide insight into the integrative nature of the marketing function and how it should be managed in the context of a particular firm or industry • To develop skills (in particular marketing applications directly relevant to the students' needs) • To foster “group based” experiential or action learning. • To help students develop their communication and presentation skills. • To encourage lateral thinking approaches that can arise as a result of peer group comment. The role of the group tutor is to guide the discussions, facilitate a supportive rather than a critical atmosphere, and to deliver traditional teaching inputs where appropriate. The format is less structured than traditional teaching systems. Often it appears to be more unstructured than it really is as the tutor leads his or her group to the conclusions needed without appearing overly pedagogic. This places great responsibility on the tutor to “lead from behind”. The aim is for the group to perceive itself as reaching its own conclusions, except where specifically assistance is required. It was noted above that, in all of the modules, the emphasis is on student-centred-learning. Basically, as previously noted, this means that you are given responsibility for your own learning. Relevant papers and support material for each topic are sourced or distributed before the classes allowing you to review the work and prepare for discussions. 4
  7. 7. Students also need to develop the skills necessary to critique academic papers as this is a most useful skill when undertaking the literature review section of the dissertation. Delivery at TEI Piraeus (Athens, Greece) The part time degree at TEI Piraeus is delivered in a different format to suit the needs of these students who are in full-time employment. This schedule will be distributed to TEI Piraeus students on registration. Assessment Assessment for the PgD and MSc International Marketing taught modules is generally a mixture of examination and continuous assessment. Please refer to module descriptors and handouts for further information. Please note that all written assignments must be accompanied by an electronic version (floppy disc or equivalent). Progression/Award Statement Students can graduate with either a Postgraduate Certificate after completing 4 modules (60 credits), a Postgraduate Diploma after completing the eight named modules (120 credits) or MSc degree per University Regulation 5. Note on MSc Dissertations There is a separate dissertation handbook which will be made available to you in due course. Students are required to enrol in September following completion of the PgD element of the programme. Additional fees may by applicable at this point. It is important to note the time limits applied to dissertations. Full time students should complete and submit their dissertation within two years of starting the PgD taught programme. However, the normal submission deadline for the dissertation is at the beginning of April in the final year of study. Part time students should complete and submit within 3 years of starting the taught programme. Extension may be granted if there are extenuating circumstances. What Do I Study… INTERNATIONAL MARKETING – DIPLOMA STREAM MODULE TITLE SEMESTER DIPLOMA students MUST select BUSNM003, MARKM001, MARKM005, MARKM006, 5
  8. 8. MARKM012 and MARKM017 PLUS two other modules Management in the Business Organisation (BUSNM003) 1 Marketing Practice (MARKM001) 1 DIPLOMA Strategic Marketing Management (MARKM006) 1 International & Global Marketing (MARKM005) 2 Select 8 Marketing Communications (MARKM012) 2 modules Research Methods (MARKM017) 2 Product Policy & Innovation (MARK4014) 1 International Business Management (MARKM016) 1 International Tourism (CATEM001) 2 Business to Business Marketing Strategy (MARK4009) 2 INTERNATIONAL MARKETING – MASTERS Students who have successfully passed all their Diploma modules need to register for the following module before being allowed to submit their dissertation: STREAM MODULE TITLE SEMESTER MSc MSc Project (International Marketing) (MARKM010) 1&2 Module Descriptor Information • The co-ordinator for each module is shown on the module descriptor. The hours shown for each module are for guidance only and may be modified as appropriate. • The learning methods and participant experience is stated on each of the module descriptors. • The aims of each of the modules are presented in relation to the course objectives. • The texts that are incorporated within each module descriptor are given to provide the student with a short list of relevant reading material. • Where appropriate, the module descriptors include a list of relevant journal articles. The University library normally holds these articles on short loan. • The project is one of the major integrative and applications areas in the course and is designed to augment the taught module contributions. MSc INTERNATIONAL MARKETING SHORT MODULE DESCRIPTORS The following short module descriptors offer an oversight of each module available for International Marketing students during Session 2007 - 2008. These are listed in module code order. 6
  9. 9. BUSNM003 – MANAGEMENT IN THE BUSINESS ORGANISATION MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Ms Mairi Gudim CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Mr Andrew Burnett ECTS POINTS:7.5 SEMESTER: 1 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Approaches to Motivation: Schein’s assumptions and their impact on approached to motivation; Modern approaches to motivation; the idea of empowerment Theories and Practice of Management: Approaches to leadership; The importance of organisational culture; The importance and impact of national culture; Human Resource Management; The management of quality; Organisation power and politics Problem Solving and Decision Making: The nature of problems: tame and wicked problems; Limitations of the rational approach to problem solving and decision making; Different models of organisational decision making. Organisation Structures and Functions: The organisation of production: Japanese sequential team working and Swedish autonomous group working: towards post-lean production; Different forms of structure: functional, product matrix and hybrid; Developments in structure: business process reengineering LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Analysis of different approaches to motivation • Description and analysis of theories and the practice of management • Analysis of various organisational functions TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Buchanan, D. & Huczynski, A., “Organisational Behaviour”, 5th edition, Prentice Hall, 2004 Useful: Burnes, B., “Managing Change”, Pitman, 1992 Pugh, D. S., “Organisation Theory”, 3rd edition, Penguin, 1990 Pugh, D. S. & Hickson, D. J., “Writers on Organisations”, 4th edition, Penguin, 1989 Daft, R. L., “Organisation Theory and Design”, 4th edition, West, 1997 Child, J., “Organisation: a Guide to Problems and Practice”, 2nd edition, Harper and Row, 1986 Journals: International Journal of Operations and Production Management; The British Journal of Management; New Technology, Work and Society ASSESSMENT: • A 3-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 40% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 36 hours of lectures • 12 hours of tutorials • 102 hours of self study 7
  10. 10. MARKM001 – MARKETING PRACTICE MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Ms Jacqui Greener CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Mrs Thandiwe Mtetwa ECTS POINTS:7.5 SEMESTER: 1 SYLLABUS DETAILS: The role of marketing in the modern firm; Business philosophies: Limitations of the marketing concept; Comparison of orthodox and alternative business concepts; Core competencies and strategic direction. Modelling consumer and Business to Business buyer Behaviour; Contingency models of organisational buyer behaviour; Relationship and partnerships in organisational buying and selling. Identification and analysis of changes in the marketing environment; Environmental Scanning, rationale and techniques. Identification and selection of target markets; Contemporary issues in market segmentation. Product policy, pricing decisions, promotion strategies and distribution procedures; Application and evaluation of marketing mix decisions; The Marketing Game. Forms of e-commerce; Benefits of the Internet and online marketing; Competitive online advantage and strategy; Ethical issues in Internet and online Marketing. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Demonstrate an understanding of the key marketing concepts and theories that underpin modern marketing theory and practice • Critically assess the relevance of current marketing concepts and theory • Demonstrate an ability to evaluate and control operational marketing decisions TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Jobber, D., “Principles and Practice of Marketing”, 4th edition McGraw Hill, Maidenhead, UK, 2004 Useful: See full module descriptor for full list. ASSESSMENT: • A 3-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 20% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation, which will count as 20% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 30 hours of lectures • 42 hours of self study • 6 hours of tutorials • 30 hours of consolidation • 2 hours of project - group • 40 hours of assessment 8
  11. 11. MARKM005 – INTERNATIONAL AND GLOBAL MARKETING MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Mohammed Boussouara CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Mr Pravin Balaraman ECTS POINTS:7.5 SEMESTER: 2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Comparison between international marketing and international trade; Evaluation of Theories of trade and their relevance to international and global activities; Investigating Transaction –cost theory and network analysis in relation to international & Global marketing. Understanding the nature and component of the international & global environment; Measuring International and global market segmentation; Analysis of International & global marketing strategies; Comparison and application of International & Global market entry modes to different types of firms. Evaluation & application of international & global product decisions; Analysis &application of International & global pricing decisions; Comparison & contrasting of International & global promotion in different contexts. International & Global Marketing in Developing countries; International & Global Marketing in Emerging markets. Review and analysis of the variables affecting the international & global marketing process. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Distinguish between Trade & marketing at the international level • Demonstrate an understanding of the international environment in relation to marketing activities • Identify & interpret international marketing opportunities • Evaluate the process of market entry strategy for all types of firms • Undertake international & Global marketing activities in product, pricing, promotion & distribution TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Lecture notes and overheads Updated Journal articles list Czinkota, M., & Ronkainen, I., E. (2004) International Marketing, 4th Ed. Thompson. Press Muhlbacher, H., Dahringer, L., & Leihs, H. (1999) International Marketing A Global perspective, 2nd Ed. Thompson Business press. Kotabe, M., Helsen, K., (2003) Global Marketing Management, 3rd Ed. J. Wiley & Sons. Paliwoda, S. (1997), International marketing, 2nd ed. Butterworth Heineman Useful: See full module descriptor for full list. ASSESSMENT: • A three-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 30% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation, which will count as 10% of the final assessment Main Exam: May Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 24 hours of lectures • 70 hours of project – individual • 12 hours of tutorials • 44 hours of self study 9
  12. 12. MARKM006 – STRATEGIC MARKETING MANAGEMENT MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Declan Bannon CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Ms Meg Dunn ECTS POINTS:7.5 SEMESTER: 1 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Introduction to Strategic Marketing Management Evaluation of Mission Statements and Organisational Purpose Innovation and Strategy Strategic Change Acquisitions and Mergers Corporate Governance Generating and Evaluating Strategic Options Culture and Strategy LEARNING OUTCOMES: • To develop an understanding of the dynamic nature of Strategy • To enable students to apply theoretical frameworks and to adopt a strategic perspective • Facilitate independent, creative and logical strategic thinking • To encourage critical thinking in the field of strategy development • Issues of Culture and Strategic Change in an International Environment TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Access to a PC, Internet, on-line journals, UoP library, Blackboard system and PowerPoint Useful: Johnson, Gerry and Scholes, Kevin, “Exploring Corporate Strategy”, 6th edition Doyle, Peter, “Marketing Management and Strategy”, Prentice Hall, 1998 Lynch, Richard, “Corporate Strategy”, FT Prentice Hall, 2000 Finlay, Paul, “Strategic Management”, FT Prentice, 2000 Piercy, Nigel, “Market-Led Strategic Change”, Butterworth Stacey, Ralph, “Strategic Management & Organisational Dynamics”, FT Prentice, 2000 Grant, Robert, “Contemporary Strategy Analysis”, Blackwell, 1998 Bennett, Roger, “Corporate Strategy”, FT Pitman, 1999 MacMillan, Hugh and Tampoe, Mahen, “Strategic Management”, Oxford, 2000 Cole, Gerald, “Strategic Management”, Letts, 1997 ASSESSMENT: • A three-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 40% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 24 hours of lectures • 30 hours of project – group • 12 hours of tutorials • 64 hours of self study 10
  13. 13. MARKM010 – MSc PROJECT (MARKETING) MODULE CO-ORDINATOR:Mr Pravin Balaraman CREDIT: 60 MODULE MODERATOR: Mr Mohammed Boussouara ECTS POINTS:30 SEMESTER: 1&2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Managing the Research Process: The importance of independent learning: Introduction to the concept of research. Selection of a suitable research topic. Project planning, time management and time scale considerations. How to formulate research aims and objectives The Literature Review: Conducting a literature review. Sources of secondary data. Referencing requirements. Methodology and Research Design: Research Philosophy: Positivism and phenomenology. Research logic: deductive and inductive approaches. Research Approaches: data collection considerations. Research limitations: internal and external validity. Collection and Evaluating of Primary Data: Data Collection techniques. Sampling techniques. Interview techniques. Access and confidentiality. Analysis of data. Dealing with Conclusions and Recommendations: Presentation of fieldwork. Links between theoretical expectation and findings. Pointers for future research. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Evidence competence related to issues pertinent to the production of a masters dissertation • Demonstrate the ability to undertake a critical literature review • Exhibit an advanced level of understanding of the application of research philosophy • Show competence in the selection and use of data • Produce a substantial piece of advanced independent work related to the theories, concepts and practical issues addressed in the taught course modules TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Malhotra, NK and Birks, DF (2003) Marketing Research: An Applied Approach, Prentice Hall Useful: Bell J (1991) Doing Your Research Project: A guide for First-Time Researchers in Education and the Social Science, Open University Press, Milton Keynes Gill, J and Johnson, P (1991) Research Methods for Managers Chapman Publishing, London Hawkins, DI and Tull DS (1993) Essentials of Marketing Research, Macmillan Publishing Company Jawousci, A D (2000) Business Research Projects, 3rd Edition, Thomson Learning Business Press Saunders et al (1999) Research Methods For Business Students, Pitman, London ASSESSMENT: • A written assignment, which will count as 100% of the final assessment The course comprises: • 125 hours of project work • 10 hours of supervision - dissertation • 465 hours of self study 11
  14. 14. MARKM012 – MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Mr Russell Campbell CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Ms Valerie Will ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Background to marketing communications; the environment within which promotion takes place; buyer behaviour; the communications process; theories and models of promotion; IMC issues and the international context. Promotional planning including setting objectives; budgeting; choosing and briefing professional collaborators; assessment of media. The role of advertising and how it fits into the overall promotion mix; the reasons for advertising; choosing alternative media. International Issues. The role of sales promotion; examination of the specific techniques available in this area and their advantages / disadvantages The rationale for personal selling; the nature and limitations of its use. Personal selling techniques and how they are integrated within the overall promotional framework; sales negotiation. The scope of direct marketing; analysis of the key techniques used within direct marketing. The nature and role of public relations; the techniques available to the practitioner; how lobbying and crisis management public relations work. The role of sponsorship: analysis of the alternative tools available. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Critically evaluate the strategic role of integrated marketing communications • Explain the role of objectives and budgeting within marketing communications • Analyse the attributes of alternative media and the effective use of external agencies • Evaluate, using effective written communication, the tactical role of the key elements of the communications mix • Apply relevant academic theory, and present-day business practices to marketing communication planning and measurement of campaign effectiveness. TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Pickton, D., and Broderick, A., Integrated Marketing Communications, Pearson Education, Second edition 2005/6 Smith, P. R. and Taylor, J., Marketing Communications: an Integrated Approach, Kogan Page, Fourth Edition, 2004 Belch, G. and Belch, M., Introduction to Advertising and Promotion, seventh Edition, Irwin, 2007 Academic journal articles: See full module descriptor for complete list. Useful: See full module descriptor for complete list. ASSESSMENT: • A three-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 40% of the final assessment Main Exam: May Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 30 hours of lectures • 30 hours of self study • 8 hours of tutorials • 30 hours of consolidation • 12 hours of project - group • 40 hours of assessment 12
  15. 15. MARKM017 – RESEARCH METHODS MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Mr David Moyes CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Ms Meg Dunn ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Managing the Research Process (1). The importance of independent learning: Introduction to the concept of research. The Purpose of management research. Classification of different types of research. What constitutes a viable research topic. Selection of a suitable research topic. Managing the Research Process (2). Guidance on the nature and purpose of the research proposal. Generating Ideas: Formulating research aims and objectives. Project planning: Time management and time scale considerations. Review, Selection and Syntheses of Literature. The purpose and definition of a critical literature review. Explanation of the outcome of a successful literature review. Identification and relevance of different types of literature. Discussion of how to structure and record a literature review. Identification of referencing formats. Methodology and Research Design Considerations. Research philosophy: positivism and phenomenology. Research logic: Explanation of the basis of inductive and deductive approaches to research. Relationship between quantitative and qualitative research methods. Research methods and research outcomes. Research limitations: internal and external validity. Ethical problems in research. Collection and Evaluating of Primary Data (1). Administering the research project: Data Collection. Research Types. Data Types. Applications. Ethnography. Case Studies. Collection and Evaluating of Primary Data (2). Qualitative Research: Research Design. Recruitment. Moderation. Group Dynamics. Projective Techniques: applications & interpretation. Qualitative Research: analysis & reporting. Collection and Evaluating of Primary Data (3). Survey Research: Criteria for selection. Contact Approaches. Non-Response Error. Measurement / Reliability. Questionnaire Design. Statistical Techniques / Research Applications. Sampling. Univariate / Bivariate Analysis. Advanced Applications: Factor & Cluster Analysis. Applications: Consumer Research (NPD / Advertising / Pricing / Selling). Applications: B2B & Management Uses (Differences / Delphi Technique / Applications). Issues in multi-national research: qualitative & quantitative. SNAP labs – practical demonstration / use of SNAP package. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Evidence a superior level of understanding of the issues pertinent to the production of a research proposal • Demonstrate the ability to undertake a critical literature review • Evaluate and critique various theoretical approaches that can be used for the selection of an appropriate research methodology • Exhibit critical awareness of the theoretical issues related to the selection of an appropriate research design • Display an advanced level of proficiency in the evaluation, selection and usage of both qualitative and quantitative techniques of data collection and analysis • Exercise initiative in the production of a research proposal related to the theories, concepts and practical issues addressed in the taught modules TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Malhotra, NK and Birks, DF (2003) Marketing Research: An Applied Approach, Prentice Hall Useful: Please see full module descriptor for information. ASSESSMENT: • A written assignment (Project Proposal), which will count as 70% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation (Project Proposal), which will count as 30% of the final assessment 13
  16. 16. Optional Module CATEM001 – INTERNATIONAL TOURISM MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Mrs Siobhan Drummond CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Mrs Heather Anderson ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: The Tourism Concept. Difficulties with definitions. Perspectives on tourism and its relationship with leisure, recreation and travel. An overview of the tourism product. Determinants of tourism demand and motivations for travel. International Tourism flow patterns and trends. Historical development of international tourism. International organisations and agencies. Functions and activities. Funding and partnerships. Key international tourism operators - planning, operations and control. Economic, environmental, political, social and cultural impacts of tourism across all sectors of the industry - travel, accommodation, visitor attractions and tourism services. North-South divide. Health and education. Dark Tourism. Destination Marketing. Urban tourism. Terrorism and its impact. Sustainability of the tourism industry. Technological developments including Internet use in marketing tourism products and services. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the development and features of international tourism • Apply critical analysis and evaluation of current issues at the forefront of international tourism • Plan and execute a project of investigation in an area of international tourism TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Cooper, C et al (2005) Tourism: Principles and Practice, 3rd edition, Longman Faulkener, B., Moscardo, G. and Laws (2003) Tourism in the 21st Century (2nd Ed), Continuum Harris, R., Griffin, T. and Williams, P (2002) Sustainable Tourism: A Global Perspective, Oxford, Butterworth Heinemann Lanfant, M-F et al (1995) International Tourism: Identity and Change, Sage, London Page, S., (2003), Tourism Management: managing for change, Butterworth- Heinemann Pender L. and Sharpley R. (2004) The Management of Tourism, SAGE Publications Poon, A. (1993) Tourism, Technology and Competitive Strategies, CAB International Robinson, M., Evans, N., Long, P., Sharpley, R. and Swarbrooke, J. (2000) Reflections on International Tourism: Developments in Urban and Rural Tourism, Business Education Publishers Ryan, C. (2002) The Tourist Experience (2nd Ed), Continuum Theobald, W, F. (1998) Global Tourism - The Next Decade 2nd Edition - Butterworth Heinemann Vellas, F and Becherel, L (1995) International Tourism, MacMillan Witt, S, Brooke, M.Z. and Buckley, P.J (1995) The Management of International Tourism, Unwin Hyman Useful: See full module descriptor for complete list. ASSESSMENT: • A three-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 30% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation, which will count as 10% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 24 hours of lectures • 6 hours of project - individual • 10 hours of tutorials • 5 hours of project - group 14
  17. 17. • 105 hours of self study Optional Module MARK4009 – BUSINESS TO BUSINESS MARKETING STRATEGY MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Mr Pravin Balaraman CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Dr Sandra Connor ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 2 SYLLABUS DETAILS: The B2B Marketing Environment: Dealing with change in economic, political, technological and legal forces; The impact of globalisation on B2B markets. The Effect of Advances in Production methods on B2B Marketing Relationships: The materials management function in large OEMs; Material strategies; The Materials Management and marketing interface; The adoption of new technologies in business to business marketing. New issues in B2B Markets: The concept of Quality Function Deployment Buying and Selling in B2B Markets: Theories and concepts of Relationship Marketing; Understanding Customer Retention models; Describing the Barriers to Exit approach to exchanges in B2B markets; Assessing the relevance of B2B partnerships. Networks of business relationships: Understanding the interdependent nature of the structure and process of business relationships; Explaining the substance and functions of business relationships; Developing understanding of the concept of business relationships as networks; Describing and assessing the strategic implications of business networks. Efficiency Considerations in Organisational Buying and Selling: Developing the notion of hybrid relationships; Describing the nature of Transaction Specific Investments; Explaining the paradox of Investments in Trust; Applying Transaction Cost Economics to B2B relationships. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Identify and account for changes in the Business to Business (B2B) environment • Appraise the impact of advances in production methods on B2B marketing • Describe and explain and assess the value of Quality Function Deployment to the B2B organisation. • Assess in a critical manner advanced models, theory and concepts of organisational buying and selling • Evaluate the contribution of diverse theories and concepts of risk and efficiency issues inherent in B2B markets TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: B2B Marketing Strategy distance learning material (available on blackboard) Useful: Please see full module descriptor for complete list. ASSESSMENT: • A written assignment, which will count as 25% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation, which will count as 25% of the final assessment • A class test, which will count as 50% of the final assessment Main Diet: Continuously Assessed Resit: - The course comprises: • 24 hours of lectures • 40 hours of self study • 12 hours of tutorials • 30 hours of consolidation • 4 hours of project - group • 40 hours of assessment 15
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  19. 19. Optional Module MARK4014 – PRODUCT POLICY AND INNOVATION MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Mr Geoffrey Whittam CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Dr Sandra Connor ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 1 SYLLABUS DETAILS: Types of products, the issues of tangibility and expansibility. Competitive advantage: functionality and image. Relevant cost bases for competition: R&D, production and promotion. Expansibility and market size. The role of technology in new product development/product innovation. Product & Industry. Explanation of different product life cycle forms and evaluation of strategies through life spans of product forms and categories. Industry life cycle and technological discontinuity. Life cycles stages and related product strategies. Industry life cycle and source of competitive advantage. Dominant designs: factors which promote them, their competitive significance. Evaluating the new product development process. Activities undertaken: creativity and the evaluation of ideas, product design criteria, test marketing, and launching new products Overview of consumer reaction to product innovations: Adoption distribution and adopter categories. Product factors, which influence the speed of diffusion. Market and consumer characteristics, which influence the speed of diffusion. Relative roles of sources of product related information. The role of both research and market research. Demand and supply based factors which influence market acceptance. Factors influencing choice of lead products. Characteristics of leaders of technology driven innovation. Characteristics, which discriminate between success and failure in the development and launch of new products. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Identify the issues involved in the development of a product through innovation • Address issues surrounding consumer sovereignty and consumer dependency • Achieve an appreciation of the development and change of markets • Identify issues involved in the diffusion of innovations TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Trott, P., “Innovation Management and New Product Development”, Financial Times/Prentice Hall, 2002 Goldenberg, J. & Mazursky, D., “Creativity in Product Innovation” C.U.P., 2002 Rogers, E., “Diffusion of Innovations” 5th edition, Free Press, 2003 Utterback, J. M., “Mastering the Dynamics of Innovation”, HBS Press, 1996 Useful: A detailed list of Journal Publications will be made available. ASSESSMENT: • A 2-hour final examination, which will count as 60% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 40% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit: - The course comprises: • 30 hours of lectures • 30 hours of consolidation • 8 hours of tutorials • 40 hours of assessment • 42 hours of self study 16
  20. 20. Optional Module MARKM016 – INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT MODULE CO-ORDINATOR: Professor Martin Myant CREDIT: 15.0 MODULE MODERATOR: Mr Paul Coleshill ECTS POINTS: 7.5 SEMESTER: 1 SYLLABUS DETAILS: The world we live in. Introduction to globalisation and trends in the world economy. The range of economic conditions and business environments. Business activities in different countries. International division of labour and international trade theories. Comparative and competitive advantage and reasons for different levels of prosperity. Internationalisation of the firm. Stages of internationalisation. Historical and current examples Dunning’s eclectic paradigm and alternative theories of internationalisation. Competition in different markets. International business environment. International financial relations and their impact on business. Interpreting exchange rates, balance of payments and international debt. The role of international agencies, IMF, World Bank and WTO. The structure and strategy of multinational companies. The structure of international firms and relationship to approaches to internationalisation. Types of organisation structure, managing integration and adaptation, headquarters/subsidiary relationships, the transnational organisation. Cooperation and competition between multinational companies. The cultural and legal environments. Approaches to cultural differences. Hofstede and criticisms of his contribution. Political environments and corruption. Different legal frameworks for business organisation in different countries and relationship to business performance. Human Resource Management in International Enterprises. Human resource management in International enterprises and relationship to firm strategy. Specific problems of managing diversity. International regulation of employment conditions: ILO standards and conventions. Relative position of women in employment. Trade union and employee rights in different countries. LEARNING OUTCOMES: • Understand the theories and problems relating to international business operations. • Develop familiarity with using the varied sources of information available to businesses for assessing the environment and possibilities for business activity in different parts of the world. • Develop the ability to synthesise and apply the literature relating to the functioning of multinational companies to specific contexts. TEXTBOOKS: Recommended: Module lecture notes and additional material made available via Blackboard Useful: See full module descriptor for complete list. ASSESSMENT: • A three-hour final examination, which will count as 50% of the final assessment • A written assignment, which will count as 40% of the final assessment • An assignment presentation, which will count as 10% of the final assessment Main Exam: January Resit Exam: August The course comprises: • 24 hours of lectures • 40 hours of self study • 12 hours of tutorials • 30 hours of consolidation • 4 hours of project - group • 40 hours of assessment 17
  21. 21. Grading System Grade Numerical Definition Descriptor range (%) A 70-100 Excellent Student work very much exceeds the threshold Outstanding standard. It displays a consistently thorough, deep and/ or extensive knowledge and understanding; originality and/or very high ability in analysis, evaluation, problem solving or other process skills; very high ability in professional practice skills (where relevant) including evidence of high degree of autonomy and independent judgement relative to threshold expectations. B1 60-69 Very good Student work is well above the threshold standard. It Commendable displays a consistently very good level of knowledge and understanding; high ability in analysis, evaluation, problem solving or other process skills; high ability in professional practice skills (where relevant) including exercise of significant independent judgement relative to threshold expectations. B2 50-59 Good Student work is clearly above the threshold standard. It Highly competent displays generally good knowledge and understanding; good ability in analysis, evaluation, problem solving or other process skills; evidences highly competent performance of professional practice skills (where relevant). C1 40-49 Satisfactory Student work is at the threshold standard. It displays Competent generally satisfactory knowledge and understanding in most key respects; competence in analysis and most other process skills; evidences competent performance of professional practice skills (where relevant). D 30-39 Unsatisfactory Student work is marginally below the threshold standard. It displays some knowledge and understanding but this is incomplete or partial; limited ability in analysis and other process skills; evidences lack of or partial competence in professional practice skills (where relevant). E 0-29 Very Student work is well below the threshold standard. It unsatisfactory displays very limited knowledge and understanding; evidences very limited or no analytical or other process skills; very limited competence over the range of professional practice skills. Progression Requirements To progress to MSc, a candidate is normally expected to have attained an average mark of at least 50% across all taught modules, with no written examination or continuous assessment element of less than 40%. TIMETABLE INFORMATION 18
  22. 22. You will find the 1st and 2nd semester timetables are included in this handbook. Please note that class times and rooms may be subject to change; therefore please ensure that you check the MSc notice board regularly for any updates. 19

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