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  1. 1. MBA Subject Outlines Outline of MBA 601: Organisational Behaviour Textbook: Champoux, J. Organizational Behavior: Essential Tenets for a New Millennium. 2nd ed. Cincinnati, Ohio: South-Western College Publishing, 2003. Synopsis This subject provides the knowledge base for understanding behaviour within organisations and provides managers with tools to manage individuals, groups and teams, and to understand the wider organisational culture and structure. Topics include the manager's job, the historical background about management, motivation, leadership, teams, problem solving, organisational design and managing change. The emphasis is on improving organisational effectiveness. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Problem Solving This segment will enable you to learn more about how to use systematic problem-solving and decision-making processes to solve organisational problems related to people, work processes, cultures and systems. Learning Outcomes At the end of this segment, you should be able to • identify and discuss each of the four steps in the problem-solving process • distinguish between performance problems and opportunity gaps • use a four-step problem-solving process to resolve gaps between the problem state and the desired state • make decisions that affect organisational effectiveness using a systematic problem-solving process • identify barriers to adequately assessing uncertainty in decisions Segment Assignment: Read the following case study that describes the reaction of the US President and his advisers to the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks. Carioggia, G.M. and M.A. Roberto, Launching the War on Terrorism, HBS Case #9-303-027, Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing, August 19, 2002. Segment 3: People at Work Dealing with people is a key part of the job of a manager. Because an MBA programme is designed to equip students to become effective senior managers, the segment will begin with a brief overview of the job of a manager. The segment will then look at some historical views about management. These have helped shape the modern ideas in this course about how a manager can most effectively deal with people. This segment will go on to teach you how to identify the ways in which differences between individual people contribute to organisational problems.
  2. 2. Each topic will introduce you to a particular aspect of human behaviour (for example, personality, perception, motivation and communication), and then provide you with methods to manage the "people problems" in organisations. Unlike typical courses in which you only learn theory, you will apply what you learn to solve problems. In this segment, you will diagnose and provide solutions for correcting people problems in organisations by applying readings to examples and by working through a case study with your team as a segment assignment. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • describe the different roles of managers and the skills they use • describe and evaluate how individual differences in behaviour and style affect and contribute to organisational problems • recognise the different ways in which people perceive the world and make decisions • identify and describe when and why people are driven to take action (ie, motivation, satisfaction and performance) • identify and describe how people interact with others through verbal and non-verbal communication Case Assignment Read the following case about communication problems in the Intel company in China. Slaughter, K.E., D. Everatt and O. Xiaojun, Intel in China, UWO Case #99C007, Ontario: Ivey Publishing, March 18, 1999. Segment 4: Managing Groups This segment presents various facets of managing groups including leadership and leading teams in a variety of work situations. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • describe different leadership styles and determine which style to use in diverse situations for greatest effect • assess your own preferred leadership style and learn the consequences, both positive and negative, of your style when leading others • make informed decisions about how to manage interpersonal and group conflict • recognise and describe how individual differences lead to problems in a team's performance • diagnose and solve team performance problems Case Assignment Read the following case and together with your team. Clawson, J.G. and J.J. Gabarro. Meeting of the Overhead Reduction Task Force, HBS Case #478-013, Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing, September 01, 1977. Segment 5: Work Structure/ Design This segment presents the different components of formal organisation, organisational structure and management processes. The content covered in each of the topics is elaborated below. Learning Outcomes:
  3. 3. At the end of this segment, you should be able to • identify and describe the various ways that organisations can be structured • identify and manage problems within the formal organisation • manage the consequences of various organisational structures • apply management processes that guide and monitor an organisation's work and staff to ensure that they are meeting organisational goals • modify elements of an organisation's human resource systems (eg, staffing, evaluations and rewards) to ensure that they fit with the organisation's goals and environment • generate and implement plans for solving the structural and procedural causes of problems in an organisation • diagnose and discuss the components of organisational culture • learn about and develop a socialisation process that communicates an organisation's culture so that employee behaviour conforms to norms, values and expectations of the organisation Segment 6: Managing Change This segment provide students the opportunity to acquire skills needed to plan for the implementation of change in an organisation. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • identify the four components of the organisational congruence model • plan to implement change in organisations using a comprehensive model and systematic process for change • overcome barriers to organisational change • diagnose the sources of resistance to change and overcome that resistance when planning a change effort in your organisation • identify leadership and management roles in planning, implementing and supporting change in your organisation Case Assignment Together with your team, read the following case about large-scale changes at General Electric. Bartlett, C.A. and M. Wozny. GE's Two Decade Transformation: Jack Welch's Leadership, HBS Case #399-150 Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing, April 28, 1999. Segment 7: Assessment For your final project, you will complete a proposal. This is a collaborative project, so you will need to work with your team to complete it. This project will provide you with an opportunity to analyse an organisation's situation as it faces change. To solve the company's problems, you and your team will determine causes of problems, generate solutions and create a plan for implementing change. You and your team will act as a consulting team invited to help a newly appointed leader to manage a change process that has met with resistance. You will use much of the information covered in this course to successfully diagnose problems and propos One of your co-workers already started to complete this proposal for Yong Woodworks Company. Unfortunately, he has been called out of the office and needs you to finish his work. He has provided you with the introduction he has written and a template to follow. What difficulties do you anticipate in implementing your solutions? How can you manage those consequences so that the change process is not derailed?
  4. 4. Outline for MBA 602: Data Analysis for Managers Textbook: Albright, S., Winston, W., Zappe, C., “Data Analysis and Decision Making with Microsoft Excel”, 2nd Edition, CA: Thomson Learning, 2003. Synopsis This subject equips students with the quantitative skills to describe and make use of the large amounts of data available in the workplace today. The concept of hypothesis testing will be developed and applied using a number of techniques designed to build models for decision making purposes. A refresher in statistics is included. This subject will also introduce the student to data- mining, an array of statistical methods to explain and make inferences from the very large databases that are created in the era of the World-Wide Web. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Descriptive Statistics Advances in computerisation, information collection, and data storage have created an information- rich environment for modern business. In order to make use of this data, managers must be able to synthesise, interpret, and make accurate decisions on the basis of such information. Data analysis provides a comprehensive set of statistical tools that enables managers to perform these tasks. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Describe the nature and use of data analysis in the context of business decision making • Distinguish between qualitative and quantitative variables, and identify variables with different measurement scales • Apply, create, and interpret visual representations of data using Microsoft Excel • Calculate and interpret numerical descriptions of data using Microsoft Excel Segment 3: Probability and Uncertainty In order to make effective decisions in the presence of risk and uncertainty, managers need to have an understanding of, and be able to apply the basic concepts associated with probability and uncertainty. While the literature on probability is extensive, this segment will cover the essential elements of probability relevant to a business decision maker. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Understand how probabilities can be assigned to events and perform basic probability calculations • Represent probability problems graphically using probability trees • Revise probabilities on the basis of additional information being obtained
  5. 5. • Apply the concepts of probability to analyse business problems where risk and uncertainty are involved Segment 4: Probability Distributions This Segment describes the possible outcomes for a random variable and their associated probabilities. Two very useful descriptive measures of a random variable and its probability distribution are the mean or expected value and the variance. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Identify random variables and distinguish between discrete and continuous probability distributions • Calculate the expected value and variance of a discrete probability distribution • Use Excel to perform calculations for Binomial and Normal distributions • Apply the concepts of probability distributions to analyse business problems Segment 5: Sampling; Methods, Distributions and Estimation Procedures This segment discusses the various techniques of randomly sampling a population and introduces the extremely important concept of the sampling distribution and the central limit theorem. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Describe the basic principles and methods for selecting random samples • Understand the concept of the sampling distribution and the central limit theorem • Develop confidence intervals for a mean or a proportion • Interpret and communicate the results of confidence interval calculations Segment 6: Hypothesis Testing Sometimes a business manager needs to test if a claim made about an unknown quantity should be accepted or rejected. For instance, a manufacturer of light bulbs might claim that the average life of their bulbs is 3000 hours. Based on the results of a sampling experiment conducted on the bulbs, it is possible to calculate the probability of observing the results obtained (or more extreme) from our sampling experiment if the claim under test is true. Depending on the results obtained, the manager can then decide whether or not to reject the claim. This process is known as hypothesis testing and is discussed in detail in this segment. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Develop appropriate hypotheses associated with business decisions • Understand the types of errors that can be made during hypothesis testing • Identify appropriate hypothesis tests for a given business problem and use Excel to perform the hypothesis test • Interpret and make business decisions on the basis of results obtained from hypothesis tests Segment 7: Regression Analysis
  6. 6. Simple linear regression quantifies how a single independent variable affects a dependent variable. This can be extended to multiple linear regression analysis, where we can quantify the relationship between a dependent variable and more than one independent variable. Problems involving determining the relationships between variables occur frequently in business decision making situations, and will be covered in detail in this segment. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, you should be able to • Describe the basic principles of simple and multiple regression • Build and analyse regression models using Microsoft Excel • Evaluate the assumptions of the regression model • Interpret and communicate the results of regression analysis Segment 8: Assessment The Final Project Working with a team of up to four students, conduct a regression analysis of the data of a company, country or other organisation of your choice about which at least ten years’ quarterly data or five years’ monthly data is available. Click on the Company or Country link for specific instructions concerning the data you must collect and the definition of dependent and independent variables in either case. If you choose another kind of organisation, you must identify your dependent variable, identify and collect data on at least five independent variables, and include at least three independent variables in final model. Using the data your team has collected, work with the team to find a good regression equation that would be useful to the company or the government. Prepare a report to explain your regression model and the regression equation. Describe how the model can be used for prediction, and thus for planning. Explain your model-building approach, showing how you selected your independent variables to be included in the model. The total length of your report, excluding tables and charts you may have used, should not exceed 2,500 words. Your instructor will inform you concerning the start date and due date for the report, and will indicate whether you should form your own teams or work with a team established by your instructor.
  7. 7. Outline of MBA 611: Financial Reporting & Statement Analysis Textbook: Stickney, C. and R. Weil. Financial Accounting: An Introduction to Concepts, Methods, and Uses. 10th ed. Ohio: South-Western College Publishing (Thomson), 2003. Synopsis This subject provides students with an understanding of the concepts and language of accounting, so that it can be used as an effective tool for communication, monitoring and resource allocation. Standard techniques of analysis will be covered, including ratio and financial statement analysis and financial statement articulation. Students will be provided a framework for understanding financial statements and accounting reports, and parent-subsidiary relationships. This subject will also provide a foundation for a subsequent elective on managerial accounting. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synposis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Financial Reporting We begin this segment by providing an overview of the financial reporting system. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • outline and analyse the information contained in the financial report and interpret the four financial statements. • specify the purpose and the elements of the four financial statements and articulate the relationships among the financial statements. • identify the role of the independent auditor and the audit process. • outline the conceptual framework of financial reporting and articulate the diversity of the global regulatory framework of financial reporting. Segment Assignment: This is an individual assignment. You are required to choose two multinational companies based in two different countries and access their most recent annual reports. Choose companies that place copies of their annual reports on their website. The annual reports are normally located within the "Investor" or "Investor Relations" section of their website. Do not choose companies from the banking or services industry. You are required to review the annual reports of these companies. Segment 3: Accounting Process This segment provides an overview of the accounting process. It explains how the double-entry framework is applied to business transactions and discusses the difference between the accrual basis and the cash basis of accounting. It also shows how a trial balance and the financial statements based on an adjusted trial balance are prepared.
  8. 8. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • apply the double-entry framework to business transactions • discuss the difference between the accrual basis and the cash basis of accounting • record business transactions in the general journal and enter them in the general ledger • prepare a trial balance and the financial statements based on an adjusted trial balance Case Assignment Title: Crystal Meadows of Tahoe, Inc Case No.: 9-192-150 Date: 28 June 1993 Author: D.J. Ellison Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 4: Assets This segment reviews GAAPs as they apply to key asset accounts. GAAP provides an overall review of the key measurement and recognition issues as they apply to these asset accounts. The focus is international in that a global review of methods and procedures applied in recognising and measuring these assets is provided. Special attention is given to the current position adopted by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) with respect to the recognition and measurement of these assets. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • account for cash, analyse receivables and apply the allowance method for uncollectible accounts • compute and analyse the cost of goods sold and the ending inventory using alternative cost- flow assumptions • compute the acquisition cost for tangible and intangible assets, apply and analyse commonly used methods to depreciate or amortise tangible and intangible long-lived assets • account for alternative investments in securities Segment 5: Liabilities and Equity This segment reviews GAAPs as they apply to key asset accounts. GAAP provides an overall review of the key measurement and recognition issues as they apply to these asset accounts. The focus is international in that a global review of methods and procedures applied in recognising and measuring these assets is provided. Special attention is given to the current position adopted by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB) with respect to the recognition and measurement of these assets. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • account for and analyse various current and long-term liabilities • account for and analyse the impact of off-balance sheet liabilities in general and leases in particular
  9. 9. • compare and contrast earnings and comprehensive earnings, and account for the issuance of capital stock and company distributions Segment 6: Statement Analysis This segment explains how an informed analysis of the financial performance of a company can be performed. It also shows how financial performance across companies and across time can be done. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • perform a thorough profitability analysis across time and across companies and provide a contextual interpretation of the findings • perform a thorough risk analysis across time and across companies and provide a contextual interpretation of the findings • perform a diagnostic earnings quality analysis and analyse the impact of accounting quality Segment 7: Assessment You are required to conduct a comparative financial analysis of three multinational companies based in three different regions (eg, Europe, the United States and Asia) over a 3-year period. Your report should include the following: • The name of each company, website, location of headquarters, the nature of its business and products, as well as a historical background about each company. • A narrative discussion of the industry's economic environment during the period of your analysis. • A narrative discussion of each company's current and prospective strategic plans. [Use information provided in the management discussion section of each company's annual report as well as any other publicly available information, where possible]. • A comparative vertical and horizontal common-size analysis. • A comprehensive comparative profitability analysis of the three companies during the period of your analysis. Discuss your findings. • A comprehensive comparative risk analysis of the three companies during the period of your analysis. Discuss your findings. The report must incorporate a detailed assessment of the impact of diversity in accounting policies and procedures upon the comparative financial analysis.
  10. 10. Outline of MBA 612: Finance Textbook: Ross, S, R. Westerfield and J. Jaffe, Corporate Finance, 6th ed. New Jersey: Irwin-McGraw Hill, 2002. Synopsis This subject introduces students to the finance function in an organisation. It teaches MBA students how to make the three strategic decisions of finance – the decision on what to invest in, the decision on how to finance the investment, and the decision on how to manage the risk associated with the investment. Investment decisions are those in which organisations commit resources now to obtain payoffs (increases of value) over the future. To understand how organisations should make these decisions, we need to establish a consistent and reliable method of valuation. Using this method, we will know when we have found worthwhile investments – those that add value to our organisation – and when we have the appropriate means of financing the investments as well the most efficient and effective techniques for managing the resulting exposure to risk or unexpected changes of the value of the investments. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Valuation in Finance This segment focuses on the investments a company must make to support the production of goods or services that the company will provide to its customers. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Apply the concept of the time value of money. • Use appropriate methods for valuing basic financial instruments and real capital budgeting exercises. • Assess the strengths of the methods used and the weaknesses of apparent alternatives. Case Assignment Title: Ocean Carriers Case No.: 9-202-027 Date: 13 September 2001 Author(s): A. Chao, K.S. Luchs and E. Stafford Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  11. 11. Segment 3: Risk In this segment, we find out how to determine a discount rate that reflects an appropriate level of risk for the investment. We also study how these calculations can be used when different types of financing – debt and equity – are used to fund an investment. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Apply standardised risk measures to create appropriate discount rates for investments. • Know when to use different methods for estimating the required rates of return on alternative investments. • Assess the strengths of the methods you use and the weaknesses of apparent alternatives. Case Assignment Title: Marriot Corp.: The Cost of Capital Case No.: 9-289-047 Date: 24 March 1989 Author(s): R.S. Ruback Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 4: Financial Securities In this subject so far, we have been concentrating on the evaluation of investment projects in order that you are able to distinguish those that will add value to your organisation from those that will add nothing or even destroy value. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • determine how capital markets can be judged to be efficient • distinguish between the capital market and the market for real assets as it relates to the principles of market efficiency and value creation • determine when to use different types of financial securities for financing positive NPV investments Case Assignment Title: USX Corp. Case No.: 9-296-050 Date: 28 February 1996 Author(s): J. Cott and S.C. Gilson Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  12. 12. Segment 5: Capital Structure This segment examines why financing decisions require managers to consider a variety of issues. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • apply capital structure theory to enhance the value of the firm and its investments with appreciation for the link between capital structure and the cost of capital • determine the value of the firm under different assumptions about the impact of dividend payments according to the different theories that apply Case Assignment Title: Debt Policy at UST, Inc. Case No.: 9-200-069 Date: 10 May 2000 Author(s): M. Mitchell Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 6: Assessment For the final project, read the Harvard Business Review case study, "Phuket Beach Hotel: Valuing Mutually Exclusive Capital Projects", then work with your team to answer the questions below. This is a group project; you need to work with your team to complete the questions. Case Title: Phuket Beach Hotel: Valuing Mutually Exclusive Capital Projects Case No.: HKU145 Date: 15 Aug 2001 Author(s): Su Han Chan, Ko Wang, Mary Ho Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  13. 13. Outline for MBA 620: Managerial Economics Textbook: Png, I. Managerial Economics, 2nd ed. Oxford: Blackwell, 2002 Synopsis This subject provides students with economic principles of production and exchange and tools to use in making business decisions. The subject covers primarily microeconomics content and includes pricing for profit maximisation, price elasticity, market structures, and modelling of businesses in varying economic climates. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Value and Trade This segment explains that value is created when the exchange of goods and services brings more in total to each party than each would obtain if the exchange did not take place. Issues considered include the buyer's willingness-to-pay for a product, seller's willingness-to-sell and the terms of that trade. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this segment, you should be able to • formulate a buyer's decision and establish willingness-to-pay • formulate a seller's decision and establish willingness-to-sell • identify potential gains from trade • apply the concept of added value to determine price in business negotiations • analyse the impact of monopoly on one side of the market in terms of overall efficiency Case Assignment Youngme, Moon. Online Music Distribution in a Post-Napster World. HBS Case #9-502-093. 19 June 2002. Boston Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 3: Demand and Costs Segment 2 introduced you to the key concepts in economics and price formation. The 'added- value' model of negotiations required some understanding of the drivers of demand and supply for goods and services but these were tailored towards an analysis of business-to-business (B2B) negotiations. We now turn to consider a more traditional economic focus on mass markets. This segment has two broad parts, one that focuses on demand and the other on supply. Demand is the focus of the next two topics, and the subsequent three topics focus on issues of supply. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this segment, you should be able to • express the law of supply and the law of demand in equations and on graphs • describe the roles of a firm's inputs and outputs in its production function
  14. 14. • perform calculations to find the total, average and marginal product of labour for a firm • calculate the differences between total, average and marginal costs in the long run and short run Segment 4: Pricing in Mass Markets This segment considers the issue of setting the price for a product given demand and supply conditions in a mass market. Considerations such as the nature of competition in the market, price elasticity of demand, as well as the short-run costs are explored. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this segment, you should be able to • evaluate when a firm has a greater or lesser degree of market power. • determine how a firm with market power will go about setting its price to maximise its profits. • evaluate the effectiveness of alternative pricing strategies including group pricing, two- part tariffs and bundling • use the tools of demand and supply to forecast changes in equilibrium prices and quantities in a competitive market. Case Assignment Kennedy, R.E., The Pharmaceutical Industry and the AIDS Crisis in Developing Countries. HSB Case #9-702-010. August 13, 2001. Harvard Business School Publishing. Segment 5: Game Theory This segment presents game theory as a formal analysis of strategic interdependence. Through the use of game models, decision-makers can predict the actions and reactions of competitors, partners, customers and others quite accurately. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • formulate a competitive situation in game theoretic terms. • analyse the equilibrium outcome of such games. • apply basic game theoretic notions to the issues of oligopolistic pricing. Case Assignment Coughlan, P.J. Note on the Home Video Game Technology and Industry Structure. HBS Case #9-700-107. 13 June, 2001. Segment 6: Incentives This segment introduces the economics of information. It will do so by focussing on the employment relationship. Issues such as how firms can use screening and employees use signalling to overcome informational problems, whether employers can devise pay-for- performance contracts with superior incentives are discussed. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • explain thoroughly how market imperfections arise from asymmetric information.
  15. 15. • identify the key issues and trade-offs in setting incentives to motivate employees. • identify issues of contractual incompleteness that might lead to the hold-up problem. Case Assignment B. Hall, C. Madigan and E. Lazear. Performance Pay at Safelite Auto Glass (A). HBS Case #9-800-291. June, 23, 2000. Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 7: Assessment The Final Project Choose a local market based on the location of one member of your team. You should try and choose a market where pricing plans are readily available on-line. You will collect data regarding mobile or cell phone pricing plans in that area; i.e., that is available to the selected team member. You will identify all the current providers and determine what pricing plans are on offer and what each package delivers. You will then use that data to address the following questions in a report on the determinants of cell phone pricing. The questions to be answered are as follows: 1. Consider five consumer types (eg, high-use business, low-use personal, traveller etc). Determine which plan each consumer type would optimally select in the markets you have collected data for. 2. Explain, both theoretically and in reality, what the drivers of differences in price plans are. For instance, are there different numbers of competitors in different market segments, different technologies or different regulatory arrangements? 3. Choose one provider in the market. Determine whether you think they could change their pricing options in a profitable manner. It may be that they cannot. In order to analyse this, you will need to set up a spreadsheet and make some assumptions. Make sure that your assumptions are explicit and comment on their reasonableness. 4. What non-price strategies do cell phone network providers use in the market you are studying? How does a consideration of this affect your answer in Question 3 above? 5. Assess the overall pricing and non-price strategy of the provider you are studying in Question 3. What can they do in the short and long run to improve their profitability?
  16. 16. Outline of MBA 630: Marketing Management Textbook: Kotler, P. Marketing Management,, 11th ed. New Jersey: Prentice Hall, 2003. Synopsis This subject introduces the concepts, principles and activities involved in the analysis, development, implementation and control of marketing programs. Topics include market opportunity analysis, segmenting and targeting markets, and the development of marketing programs. The latter includes the development and marketing of product and services, marketing communications and promotions, channels of distribution, and price. Related topics include market research, frameworks to understand and analyse customers and competitors, and the effect of the broader environment on marketing decision-making. Students will apply the concepts and principles through case analyses and the development of a marketing plan. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Marketing Foundations Marketing Foundations introduces students to the fundamental concepts of marketing products and services. It provides the background necessary to look in depth at key elements of marketing, such as product, price, place and promotion. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Identify customer needs. • Perform market segmentation to select target segments. • Establish in the minds of customers the distinct values of a product compared to competitive offerings. • Communicate product benefits to customers. • Make marketing decisions about product, price, place and promotion. • Identify the importance of customer satisfaction, value and relationship management to organisational success. Case Assignment Hilton HHonours Worldwide: Loyalty Wars; #9-501-010 Date: October 12, 2000 Author(s): J. Deighton, and S. Shoemaker Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 3: Analysing Opportunities In this segment, students will study various frameworks for understanding customer and competitor behaviours in consumer and business markets, the industry operating environment and market research tools for understanding consumer preferences. In addition, methods of collecting and analysing data about consumer preferences will be presented. Companies, especially market-oriented organisations, need this data to ensure that the products and services they plan to design and deliver have a viable market.
  17. 17. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Devise systems to understand and measure market demand. • Apply key methods for identifying and following market trends. • Profile key consumer buying behaviours. • Identify key processes and influences in business buying decisions. • Analyse information about competitors and use it to develop positioning strategies for products or services in a competitive market. • Evaluate market segment information to make decisions about possible entry into new markets. Case Assignment Title: Matching Dell Case No.: #9-799-158 Date: June 6, 1999 Author(s): J.W. Rivkin and M.E. Porter Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 4: Developing Strategies Once marketers have collected and analysed data about potential consumers and competitors, the next step is either to establish potential strategies for introducing new products to the market or to reposition current products for new markets or new uses. This segment, Developing Strategies, focuses on how to build multiple strategic options. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Decide among positioning strategies at each stage of the product life cycle and market evolution. • Strategically plan for new project launches and identify factors that affect the diffusion and consumer adoption rate. • Develop marketing strategies that account for differences among international markets. Case Assignment Title: TiVo Case No.: #9-501-038 Date: November 22, 2000 Author(s): Luc Wathieu and Michael Zoglio Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 5: Making Decisions Segment 5, Making Decisions, further discusses the factors that lead to effective marketing of new and repositioned products and services. It builds on the ideas that students have explored in Segments 2 and 3 and continues to explain the strategic planning and implementation process. Learning Outcomes:
  18. 18. Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Develop and evaluate product and branding strategies. • Design marketing initiatives for services. • Determine pricing strategies in light of different factors, including competitor actions. Case Assignment Title: Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts Case No.: #9-800-385 Date: June 29, 2000 Author(s): R. Hallowell Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 6: Integrating Strategies Strategy development requires using a set of building blocks, which are often referred to as the four Ps of marketing. So far students have considered two: product development and pricing strategies for both services and products. In this segment students consider multiple factors and their interaction. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • Establish marketing strategies for channel management. • Integrate logistic information into strategy development. • Develop an integrated marketing communications strategy. • Apply the principles of promotion to developing an integrated programme for advertising, sales promotion, public relations, direct marketing and e-marketing. • Explain the key factors in recruiting, hiring, training, motivating and evaluating a sales force. • Evaluate the overall organisational components of a corporation's marketing function. Case Assignment Title: Heineken N.V: Global Branding and Advertising Case No.: #9-596-015 Date: October 11, 1995 Author(s): J.A. Quelch Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 7: Assessment Final Case Project You are asked to write up an individual case analysis of the following case study: Title: Staples.com Case No.: HBS #9-800-305 Date: Feb 17, 2000 Authors: Jacobson, J., T. Eisenmann and G. Morris. Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  19. 19. Outline of MBA 640: Managing International Business Textbook: Cullen, J.B. Multinational Management: A Strategic Approach. 2nd ed., Mason, Ohio: South- Western College Publishing, 2003. Synopsis This MBA subject, Managing International Business facilitates this process by helping to develop the skills, and providing the tools and frameworks, necessary for a manager to function effectively in an international business setting. The topics in this subject, hence, include the analysis of national environments, market choice, entry mode choice, balancing demands for global integration and local responsiveness, subsidiary management and management of expatriates. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Global Environments This segment will enable you to learn how to evaluate foreign markets along cultural, political and economic dimensions to make effective decisions about which markets to enter, and when to enter those markets. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • identify each of the major sources of variance in national environments • distinguish among the cultural, political and economic environments • use this understanding of national environments to conduct a thorough country-level analysis that understands the implications of variance in culture, politics and economics for the strategy of a firm operating in international markets • make decisions about the value of entering a particular national market at a particular juncture in a firm's international expansion Case Assignment Title: Technophar in Viet Nam Author: Andrew Delios and Paul W. Beamish Case No.: 9A95GO12 Date: 27 January 2000 Publisher: Ivey Publishing Segment 3: Market Choice This segment provides you with a concrete understanding of the concepts of globalisation, the multinational firm and foreign direct investment. We use this understanding as a foundation for formulating strategic decisions about aspects of a firm's international market participation. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to:
  20. 20. • identify the regional trends in globalisation and relate the implications of these trends to a firm's international strategy • use your understanding of the theory of foreign direct investment and multinational firms to help you make decisions about a firm's international operations • select a market or markets for a firm's international operations by integrating your understanding of globalisation, foreign direct investment and multinational firms, with analyses of host countries' national institutional environments Case Assignment Title: FDI in China Case No.: 9-701-061 Date: 14 March 2002 Author: Yasheng Huang Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 4: Mode Choice This segment will enable you to make decisions about how to enter a foreign market. The 'how' question refers to the entry mode used for foreign market entry. We distinguish between non- equity and equity modes in topics 4.2 and 4.3 and consider co-operative forms of entry, such as the strategic alliances, in topic 4.4. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • select a mode to enter a foreign market by making an informed comparison of the costs and benefits associated with each type of mode of entry • design and implement an entry strategy for a market, once a type of entry has been selected • design a joint venture, considering issues of the structure of the joint venture and the choice of partners for the joint venture. Case Assignment Title: Studds Nolan Joint Venture Case No.: 9A96G001 Date: 26 July 2001 Author(s): Jaideep Anand and Andrew Delios Publisher: Ivey Publishing Segment 5: Global and Local This segment will enable you to learn how to make choices about a multinational firm's strategy and structure, once it has moved into global markets via its foreign direct investment activities. Learning Outcomes for the Segment: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • define and differentiate the four archetypes of multinational strategies: transnational, international, multidomestic and regional • integrate the complexities of the global-local dilemma faced by a firm in its international operations in developing a strategy and structure for a firm in its international market • develop an organisational design strategy for a multinational firm that balances needs for global integration and local responsiveness across the different products that it produces
  21. 21. Case Assignment Title: Warner-Lambert Company Case No.: A07-97-0006 Date: 1997 Author: Andrew C. Inkpen Publisher: Thunderbird Segment 6: Subsidiary Operations This segment will enable you to learn how to evaluate and develop the competitiveness of an individual subsidiary operation within a host country's national institutional environment. It places you in the perspective of a manager in a subsidiary, as you operate within the roles and responsibilities provided to a subsidiary by its parent multinational. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • apply the idea of a subsidiary's responsibility in a firm (its mandate) to develop strategies for subsidiary initiatives, particularly in the context of a multinational firm undergoing changes in its operations • understand the technology imperative for current multinational firms and how the associated knowledge management functions link to and are managed by overseas subsidiaries • formulate and implement strategy from the perspective of a subsidiary of a multinational corporation using the concepts of subsidiary development and centres of excellence Case Assignment Title: Scotch-Brite (3M) Case No.: 9A93G003 Date: 25th July 2001 Author(s): Paul W. Beamish Publisher: Ivey Publishing Segment 7: International Managers This segment will teach you to how to balance demands across a firm's multiple national environments when considering the design of its human resource management practices and when developing standards to approach ethical issues in its operations. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • design a HRM strategy that is consistent with a firm's multinational strategy and consistent with the context of the host country in which a firm operates • understand differences between ethical, legal and economic analysis and the implications of these differences for the development of a firm's strategy • execute an appropriate personal and corporate policy for a multinational firm in the multiple national environments in which it operates when there are conflicting ethical orientations Case Assignment
  22. 22. Title: Royal Dutch/Shell in Nigeria Case No.: 9-399-126 Date: 22 February 1999 Authors: Lynn Sharp Paine and Mihnea C. Moldoveanu Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 8: Assessment For your final project, you will conduct a case analysis. You will take the position of a consultant for the Philips and Matsushita companies. You will write your report in the style of providing recommendations to both companies. Please remember that this is an individual assignment. You must provide a recommendation for both companies in your report, as a report without a recommendation for both companies is an incomplete one. The case you will read for this report is: Title: Philips versus Matsushita: A New Century, A New Round Case No.: 9-302-049 Date: 27 February 2002 Author: Christopher A. Bartlett Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  23. 23. Outline of MBA 650: e-Business Textbook: Weill, P., and Vitale. Place to Space, 2001, HBS Press, Boston, Mass USA ISBN 1-57581-245-X Synopsis e-Business involves the implementation of IT-enabled business strategies, via internet-based business practices. Despite the dot.com bubble, most organisations either are or will soon be pervasively integrating e-Business practices into their mainstream activities. This subject provides the key concepts of e-Business, focusing particularly on the business issues, challenges and opportunities. Our emphasis is not on the technologies per se, but on the business applications and characteristics of the technologies that can bring enhanced revenues, cost savings, and broader market reach to organisations of all types. This subject examines how e-Business can be used to provide opportunities to improve an organisation’s effectiveness and competitiveness in its overall strategy and its functional activities such as marketing and supply chain management, through communication, co-ordination and transactions over the internet and associated technologies. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: e-Strategy This segment provides perspectives of how to consider e-Business as a set of enabling technologies that can drive and must integrate with an organisation’s business strategy. Just like any other technologies, e-Business technologies, principally the Internet and various related forms such as intranets, are not of interest as an end in themselves, but as a means to an end. That end is to empower business strategies, both overall and in a functional sense, such as marketing and supply chain strategies. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • adjust and refine the business strategies of bricks and mortar companies to take advantage of the Internet. • use two fundamentally important business tools for analysing business strategy: the SWOT analysis (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) and the value chain. • use e-Business and Internet concepts to enhance any strategic plan. • use Internet, infrastructure and related technologies to add power to strategic plans and frameworks. • be able to design successful strategies based on e-Business, particularly for B2B success. Case Assignment Title: Constructing an e-Supply Chain at Eastman Chemical Co. Case No.: #HKU222 Date: 25 September 2002 Authors: Yen, B., Farhoomand, A.F. and P. Ng. Publisher: Harvard Business School case (Field) study
  24. 24. Segment 3: e-Commerce This segment provides the fundamental knowledge needed by managers in order to assist them to be able to make best use of the Internet and e-Business technologies in their business and functional strategies. It is important that managers understand the capabilities, characteristics and limitations of major technologies in their organisations, and for most organisations, there is no more pervasive a technology than their IT and e-Business technologies. Managers do not need to know all of the technical detail, but need to know enough to allow them to correctly devise strategy and tactics, allocate resources, and be able to forecast opportunities and threats looking forward. After presenting the fundamental characteristics of how the Internet and its IT architectures operate, this topic examines payment systems, privacy issues and requirements and other technical aspects of e-Business opportunities. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • present to your organisation the basic concepts surrounding the Internet, including its various terminologies and the technology that underlies it. • make informed decisions about how Internet functionalities would benefit your organisation. • encourage the development of privacy policies that promote trusting relationships and add value for companies and their customers Case Assignment Title: Electronic Service Delivery Implementation and Acceptance Strategy. Case No.: #HKU223 Date: 15 August 2002 Authors: Farhoomand, A.F. and McCuuley Publisher: Harvard Business Online Segment 4: B2B e-Commerce Business to Business transactions comprise the biggest potential area of gain for those wanting to integrate the internet into their organisation. This segment develops understanding of B2B opportunities and capability of how to do it. Using well known companies such as Dell, Federal Express, Cisco and GE, B2B is traced from its start, and using technologies such as EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) through to the present dynamic internet technologies, B2B is presented, including topics of Vertical and Horizontal Markets, exchanges, and the use of the internet to control supply chains and drive their efficiency forward. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • apply the unique benefits the Internet brings to B2B E-Commerce to your organisation. • choose an appropriate B2B model for implementation in your organisation. • utilise and derive value from implementing supply chain management concepts as a fundamental underpinning of B2B E-Commerce. • recognise the various advantages of B2B electronic trading hubs. Case Assignment
  25. 25. Title: Citibank's e-Business Strategy for Global Corporate Banking. Case No.: #HKU197 Date: 7 June 2002 Authors: Yu, J., Farhoomand, A.F., McCauley, M. and S. Khan. Publisher: Harvard Business School case (Field) study. Segment 5: B2C e-Commerce This segment provides the information that managers should know about business-to-consumer Internet practices. It begins with illustrations that thought and planning is required to overcome natural obstacles in this regard, such as technological challenges, This is followed by an examination of transition issues from conventional channels to electronic, service-cost tradeoffs, Companies must make choices in terms of how they design and configure their B2C offerings, and choices and tools are available in terms of synchronous or asynchronous designs, and the use of CRM (customer relationship management) techniques. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • apply the concepts of e-Business to formulate and implement B2C e-Business initiatives. • transition customers to online channels and services. • construct and implement business models that drive B2C value in their organisation. • use appropriate applications of automated customer interaction and integrate automated interaction with human customer interaction. • mitigate online channel conflict when possible. • integrate website strategies with online alliance channel strategies. Case Assignment Title: Seven-Eleven Japan: Venturing into e-Trailing Case No.: #HKU101 Date: 1 January 2000 Authors: Farhoomand, A.F. and D. Tan. Publisher: Harvard Business School case (Field) study Segment 6: e-Business Leadership Segment Description: This segment covers the topics of leadership and human resource management as applied in the new economy. This is an important subject of study, because leadership and 'people- management' needs to be re-thought and practised differently in the new economy. In the new economy, information arrives at its destination instantaneously, customers are empowered with information and choices like never before, the firm's assets are mostly intellectual capital, and employees are also empowered to make decisions more than ever. The networked organisation needs vision from its leaders more than ever to ensure that people who are making decisions in a decentralized manner, are taking the organisation in the same direction. And finally, staff have higher expectations of their organisation, that their organisations will inform them, give them better working conditions and technology, and a share of rewards from their efforts that is commensurate with their performance. The assignment at the end of this segment tests knowledge and capability in leading an e-Business from a human resources perspective.
  26. 26. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • gain insights of sound leadership required in the new economy, and use these insights to make you a better leader. • manage new economy human resource practices. • deal with the particular cultural requirements of operating in the e-Business environment, and be able to translate these into human resource management policies and practices in that context. • develop a plan for e-Business strategies and their leadership. Segment 7: Assessment Case Assignment Title: GE's Digital Revolution: Redefining the E in GE. Case No.: #9-302-001 Date: 29 May 2002 Authors: Bartlett, C.A. and M. Glinska. Publisher: Harvard Business School Case (Field) Study.
  27. 27. Outline of MBA 690: Strategic Management Textbook: Competing for Advantage, Hoskisson, R.E., M.A. Hitt and R.D. Ireland. Mason, Ohio: Thomson-Southwestern, 2003. Synopsis This subject helps the student develop an ability to see the organisation as a whole and to understand how and why the various functions of an organisation are interdependent and need to be managed in an integrated manner. The dominant viewpoint in the subject is, therefore, that of the top manager, business owner or the executive of a self-contained business division within a large corporation. The thrust of the subject is how the organisation goes about ensuring its survival in the medium-to-long-term future, i.e., how it “reads” the environment it operates in, chooses strategies to effectively position itself in that environment and how it organises its internal administrative functions and activities. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Strategic Thinking This segment provides the background to understand how organisations are able to achieve superior performance and a competitive advantage in relation to their competitors. It illustrates the elements of developing strategic intent and the firm's strategic mission. Finally, it illustrates critical aspects necessary to implement strategic leadership in an organisation. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, students should be able to • define value creation, competitive advantage and above-average returns • describe the 21st-century competitive landscape and explain how globalisation and technological changes shape it • use the Industrial Organisation (I/O) Model to explain how firms can earn above- average returns • use the Resource-Based Model to explain how firms can earn above-average returns • define strategic leadership and describe top-level managers' importance as a resource to stakeholders • understand the model of effective strategic leadership Case Assignment: Intel Corp.-1968-2003 Authors: Ramon Casadesus-Masanell , David B. Yoffie , Sasha Mattu Case No.: 9-703-427 Date: May 12, 2003 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 3: External Analysis
  28. 28. This segment explores how to the business context can be evaluated to yield information whch can be used to develop more effective strategies. Some of the external determinants of rates of returns across different industries and sectors are also included. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this segment, you should be able to • analyse the industry environment of a given firm • identify the key factors in the broader environment that might impact the strategies and performance of players in any industry • use the Five Forces Model to identify the most critical of the five forces and diagnose the drivers of the particular force (eg, what make the suppliers powerful? Why is the rivalry so intense and why does it sap profitability?) • identify important current and potential competitors Case Assignment: British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) Author: Helm, C. Case No.: 8 Publisher: Westminster Business School Segment 4: The Internal Analysis This segment focuses on identifying how and why some firms are able to obtain a sustained competitive advantage while others just earn competitive parity or worse. Building to the SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis introduced in Segment 2, "Strategic Thinking", this segment focuses on the strengths and weaknesses of individual firms. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • understand why it is important for firms to analyse their resources and capabilities • identify the differences between tangible and intangible resources • identify firm capabilities and discuss how they are developed • describe four criteria used to determine whether resources and capabilities can potentially offer sustained superior performance • use value chain analysis to identify and evaluate resources and capabilities • define outsourcing and discuss the reasons for its use • prevent core competencies from becoming core rigidities Case Assignments: Marks & Spencer (A) Marks & Spencer (B) Authors: Montgomery, C.A. Authors: Rivkin, J.W. and M. Porter Case No.: 9-391-089 Case No.: 9-391-090 Date: March 25, 1991 Date: March 25, 1991 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Publishing Segment 5: Business-Level Strategy This segment identifies the basic strategy patterns that are commonly used in businesses today which can help firms utilise their competitive advantage.
  29. 29. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • understand what are business-level strategies • explain the differences between customers and business-level strategies in terms of who, what and how • differentiate among business-level strategies • understand competitive dynamics in the context of slow-cycle, fast-cycle and standard- cycle markets Case Assignment: Matching Dell Authors: Montgomery, C.A. Case No.: 9-799-158 Date: 25 March 1991 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 6: Corporate Strategies This segment focuses on firm growth from the perspective of the corporation. Corporate-level strategy concentrates on the selection and management of the firm's business portfolio. The segment covers two related areas, diversification and co-operation. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • understand the importance of corporate-level strategies • discuss the different levels of diversification and the advantages and disadvantages associated with each level • explain value creation in diversification • discuss the roles of incentives and managerial motives in diversification • define co-operative strategies and the reasons of their use • explain the different types of strategic alliances • summarise the most important risks of co-operative strategies Case Assignment: Vivendi: Revitalizing a French Conglomerate Authors: Turner, J.M., E.J. Gordon and C.A. Montgomery Case No.: 9-799-019 Date: February 27, 2001 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 7: Mergers & Restructuring This segment discusses how acquisitions can help firms deal with environmental changes and create value and why, in many cases, they result in the need for restructuring. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing this segment, you should be able to
  30. 30. • identify the reasons why firms use merger and acquisition strategies to create value • identify the benefits and risks associated with mergers and acquisitions • understand the key challenges of integrating parent and target (when necessary) • understand the concept of synergy, its types and relevance to acquisitions • identify the key drivers of restructuring as well as the types of restructuring • understand how mergers, acquisitions and restructuring vary across the globe Case Assignment: Kraft and General Foods Merger (A) Author(s): Collis, D.J., T. Stuart Case No.: 9-391-139 Date: 31 May 1995 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 8: Internal Strategy This segment prepares students as the managers to understand the opportunities and threats that firms normally face in their global environment and to formulate effective international strategies that help to exploit certain core competencies. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • identify the motives for firms to pursue international business operations • recognise basic international strategies and the structures associated with these strategies • discuss the pros and cons of different modes of market entry based on both market and firm characteristics • understand the implications of international strategies for innovation, risk and performance Case Assignment: Jollibee Foods Corp. (A): International Expansion Author: Bartlett, C.A. and J. O'Connell Case No.: #9-399-007 Date: July 7, 1998 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 9: Corporate Governance This segment explores the different governance mechanisms, effective and ineffective combinations given the strategic needs of the firm, and what needs to be done to reduce governance failure. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to
  31. 31. • define what corporate governance is and why it used to monitor and control managerial decisions • understand agency relationships and managerial opportunism and the implications they have on strategy • explain how the three components of governance (ownership concentration, board of directors and compensation) represent a system used to monitor and influence managerial decisions • discuss the three commonly used forms of compensation and their effects on decision- making • describe the use of corporate governance in international settings and how it varies across countries Segment Assignment: Al Dunlap at Sunbeam Authors: Hall, B., R. Khurana and C. Madigan Case No.: 9-899-218 Date: April 12, 1999 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 10: Assessment Your assignment is to write about a case similar to those you have analysed in the end-of- segment assignments which you came across in this subject. Assignment: Intel Corp. – 1968-2003 Authors: Casadesus-Masanell, R., D.B. Yoffie and S. Mattu Case No.: 9-703-427 Date: 12 May 2003 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  32. 32. Outline of MBA 701: Project Management Methods Textbook: Meredith, J. R. and S. J. Mantel. Project Management: A Managerial Approach. 5th ed. John Wiley and Sons, 2003. Synopsis The subject is designed to explore the principles of project management. The topics of assembling and managing resources, establishing a project budget, managing costs, critical tasks and task dependencies and managing task delays are covered. Techniques such as scheduling and tracking progress, Gantt and flow charts and PERT analysis are examined. The subject also looks at managing technology projects, including the introduction of a new product or service, redesign of an introduction system, and managing multiple projects and interdependencies. Finally, the subject examines the behavioural and organisation aspects of managing projects. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Contemporary Issues This segment discusses the contemporary issues facing project managers. Topics such as organisational structures, different structures that influence projects, and how these structures impact the project manager will be examined. Additionally, the concept of the project management office (PMO) and project management maturity model (PMMM) will be introduced. Learning Outcomes: Given a business scenario, you should be able to • describe the different types of organisational systems and the rationale for them • identify the various types of organisational structures • explain the roles and responsibilities of a project manager in each of the different types of organisational structures • apply the principles of a project management office (PMO) • rank the degree of project management maturity of an organisation using PMMM identify factors unique to project work Segment Assignment: Describe the pros and cons of creating a Project Management Office (PMO) in your organisation. What is unique about your organisation that it would, or would not, benefit from such an office? Can you see the rationale for going to the highest level, level 5, of the PMMM in your organisation? Why or why not? What recommendations would you make to move your organisation to the next level of PMMM? Segment 3: Defining a project The segment describes the salient characteristics of a project. Learning Outcomes:
  33. 33. Given a business scenario, you should be able to • identify factors unique to project work • identify triggering mechanisms which give rise (birth) to projects • determine the objectives and sub-objectives to be achieved in completing a project • identify key assumptions and risks in completing a project • determine which projects among a set of potential candidate projects are selected and why • draft the project overview document and gain major stakeholder approval of a project • set the general project plan for accomplishing the objective or solving the identified problem Segment Assignment: You might consider developing a project overview statement for a project like the Torch Relay in the section, “Project management in practice: The Olympic torch relay project”, of Chapter 2, “Projects in contemporary organization,” of the textbook: Meredith, J. R. and S.J . Mantel. Project Management: A Managerial Approach. 5th ed. John Wiley and Sons, 2003, or a composting project, like the one described on page 63 of the same textbook, for Larry’s markets. Segment 4: Planning a project This segment describes the planning phase of a project. Learning Outcomes: Given a project to manage, you should be able to • develop a work breakdown structure (WBS) • determine the estimated activity durations, and associated costs and resource usage for each • gain an understanding of the usefulness of computer software for project planning • apply logic to schedule the various project activities • identify activities on the critical path • draft a project proposal Segment Assignment: You need to identify a project of your own (which you are familiar with) and prepare a project proposal. Segment 5: Organising a project This segment describes the organising phase of the project. Learning Outcomes: Given a project to manage, you should be able to • recruit a project manager and a project team to assist you in completing your project • determine other personnel needs • determine how to organise your project team • assign personnel to individual work packages • assess the impact of culture in constructing and co-ordinating a project • enter personnel assignments into P3E/c • estimate initial resource loading using P3E/c
  34. 34. • perform resource levelling using P3E/c Segment Assignment: For this assignment, you are required to read the case, “Pelican Landing: Bender Corporation” in Chapter 6, “Conflict and Negotiation,” of the textbook: Meredith, J. R. and S. J. Mantel. Project Management: A Managerial Approach. 5th ed. John Wiley and Sons, 2003. Segment 6: Controlling a project - I This segment describes the controlling phase 1 of the project. Learning Outcomes: Given a project to manage, you should be able to • apply the necessary control tools to balance and monitor the project schedule, project costs, and scope • explain the various types of management styles • conduct effective status meetings to discuss and monitor the progress of projects • interpret Earned Value reports and use these reports to better manage a project • prepare status reports and conduct project reviews Segment 7: Controlling a project – II This segment describes the controlling phase 2 of the project. Learning Outcomes: Given a project to manage, you should be able to • quantify, qualify, assess and effectively deal with risk(s) in a project • determine how and when to use project crashing and fast-tracking • use filters in project scheduling • describe the importance of and document change orders Case Assignments: Pricing a Risky, One-Time Contract (A) International Guidance and Controls Author: Filliben, E. Author: No Author Listed Case No: UVA-OM-0737 Case No. UVA-QA-0350 Date: 1994 Date: 1986 Publisher: Darden Graduate Business Publisher: Darden Graduate Business School, University of Virginia School, University of Virginia Segment 8: Closing a project The segment considers the final phase of the project, the closing phase. Learning Outcomes: Given a project to manage, you should be able to • obtain stakeholder approval and sign-off • implement the project or solution (install deliverable)
  35. 35. • document the project • draft a final project report • conduct a project audit or post review Segment 9 : Assessment The Final Project The final project requires you to demonstrate practical knowledge of best project management practices. You will work through a small example, managing a project from beginning to end. This will be accomplished by making use of P3E/c. Documents should be attached or submitted as electronic files to your instructor
  36. 36. Outline of MBA 720: Global and Regional Economic Development Textbook: Reinert, K.A. Windows on the World Economy: An Introduction to International Economics. US: South-Western, 2005 Synopsis This subject explores the prospects and contexts for economic growth and development in the world's major markets. Current trends in the major economic regions are examined, along with relationships among global business trends and regional and national developments. International trade barriers, agreements and regulations are introduced. The subject will address macroeconomics concepts in a comparative developmental context, highlighting the differences between developed and developing countries. The subject will also address the roles that institutions play in the development of economies. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synposis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Macroeconomic Variables and Policies The segment examines aggregate economic variables that concern the entire industries, national economies and the global economy. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the segment, you should be able to • differentiate between microeconomics and macroeconomics • identify the variables that economists and business managers focus on when examining an economy • locate data for key economic variables • predict the effects of fiscal and monetary policies on the national economy • compare and contrast the trends found in your country to that of a less developed country and a more developed country • assess the long-term economic prospects of the above-mentioned three economies as suitable or unsuitable for investment Segment 3: Developing Strategies and Country Analysis This segment presents issues such as economic growth, economic development, the East Asian Miracle and the subsequent halt to this miracle during the Asian economic crisis. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the segment and assignment, you should be able to • relate economic development theories and link them with the realities of a few Asian economies • demonstrate the role of government and markets in steering an economy towards its development path
  37. 37. • explain the causes and remedies of the Asian economic crisis • identify future challenges faced by the Asian economies Segment 4: International Economic Linkages This segment presents issues related to international trade and international investments, the two critical ways in which countries are linked economically. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the segment and assignment, you should be able to • explain why countries trade with each other • explain why countries invest in each other • identify the trends in global trade and investments • describe the importance of international trade and international investments for individual countries • identify the role of government policies in enhancing these linkages Case Assignment: Dell Computer Corporation: Investment in Malaysia as a Global Strategic Tool Authors: Tan, J. and M.N. Young Case No.: 9B03M019 Date: May 2003 Publisher: Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario Segment 5: International Economic Institutions In this segment, the discussion is extended to the international economic institutions, which are either global or regional in nature. Among the global institutions, the World Trade Organization (WTO) and its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT), as well as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are emphasised. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the segment and assignment, you should be able to • relate economic development theories and link them with the realities of a few Asian economies • demonstrate the role of government and markets in steering an economy towards its development path • explain the causes and remedies of the Asian economic crisis • identify future challenges faced by the Asian economies Segment Assignment: Download the case on India from http://www.itd.org/issues/india0.htm (accessed 7 August 2003). You represent the Indian Ministry of Trade and Industry. You have been asked to deliver a keynote address to the All-India Small Agriculture Producers' Association on the benefits of trade liberalisation to the Indian agricultural sector.
  38. 38. Segment 6: International Economic Expansion This segment explain why firms go abroad, discusses how the relative strengths and weaknesses of a range of locations for global expansion can be analysed and presents the methods and problems of collecting data and making cross-country comparisons. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of the segment and the assignment, you should be able to • explain why firms go abroad • analyse the relative strengths and weaknesses of a range of locations for global expansion • identify the methods and problems of collecting data and making cross-country comparisons • demonstrate the ability to make strategic decisions regarding the choice of location for expansion in a given case. Segment Assignment The assignment involves proposing the next country for expansion for the Aeon Group of Japan. Prepare a report for the senior management on the next country JUSCO should expand into. You can choose any country in Asia Pacific except those where JUSCO is already established (Malaysia, Thailand, Hong Kong, China, Taiwan), and Vietnam and Australia (these countries are covered in your final project). Segment 7 : Assessment The Final Project Country Analysis: A Framework to Identify and Evaluate the National Business Title Environment Author: Alexandar Dyck, I.J. Case No.: 9-797-092 Date: 2 May 1997 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing
  39. 39. Outline of MBA 730: Marketing Strategy Textbook: There is no prescribed textbook for this subject. Your core reading for this subject is the Markstrat Online Student Handbook, Markstrat3, The Strategic Marketing Simulation - Jean-Claude Larreche and Hubert Gatignon, South-Western College Publishing, Ohio, ISBN 0-538-88089-9. Synopsis This subject requires the integration and application of the theories, concepts and principles learned in Marketing Management to strategic marketing problems. Strategic frameworks and theory that aid in the analysis of marketing problems are also presented. The subject requires the analysis of case studies that are drawn from a variety of industries and nations. In addition, the subject requires team-based involvement in a comprehensive, multi-period strategic marketing computer simulation. The simulation demonstrates the effects of marketing mix decisions made over time on organisational outcomes. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: The Role of Marketing Strategy This segment discusses the realm of marketing strategy. This segment focuses on the role of marketing strategy in the commercial and non-profit arenas and the ways and means of implementing a strategy successfully. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • explain the nature of strategic decisions in management • explain the relationship between marketing strategy and marketing tasks • explain the relationship between marketing strategy, business strategy and other functional strategies • identify the role of marketing strategy in creating core business processes • identify the relationship between marketing strategy and market orientation • explain, in broad terms, the role of marketing strategy in determining the success and survival of an organisation Case assignments Marks and Spencer, Ltd (A) Authors: Montgomery, C.A., C. Harris and J.L. Bower Moving Mountains at Marks and Spencer Case No.: 9-391-089 Authors: Christopher, M. and H. Peck Date: 5 December 1994 Date: 2001 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publisher: Council of Logistics Management, Publishing USA
  40. 40. Segment 3: Analysis of Context This segment examines the external aspects of analysis including environmental, competition and consumer. It also explores some of the methodologies available to inject rigour and creativity into the analysis process. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to: • explain the role of analysis in marketing strategy making • provide an analysis of environmental context using appropriate frameworks and methods • provide an analysis of the industry context using appropriate frameworks and methods • understand the relationship between managerial decisions, analysis tools and consumer • behaviour • provide an analysis of the consumer context using appropriate frameworks and methods • explain the impact of the resource base of the organisation on its strategy options • provide a synthesis of this material that would be managerially useful Case Assignment Hurricane Island Outward Bound School Authors: Clark, B.H. and T.V. Bonoma Case No.: 9-588-019 Date: 23 September 1994 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 4: Marketing Strategy Formulation This segment looks at two fundamental approaches to marketing strategy that focus on answering two important questions, namely, whom does a company serve and how does the company serve better than its competitors. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • identify from the actions and behaviours of a firm the extent to which the firm seeks to follow a market segmentation or differential strategy • explain the concept of strategy as rules for decision-making • explain the approaches available to assist in segmenting markets • identify the key features of a market selection driven strategy • explain the approaches available to help identify differential value • identify the key features of a differential advantage driven strategy • explain the impact of alternative strategies on general business activities Case Assignment Rohm and Haas (A) New Product Marketing Strategy Authors: Rangan, V.K. and S. Lasley Case No.: 9-587-055 Date: 25 May 25 1993 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 5: The Business Simulation The topic “Markstrat3 Basics” introduces the basic features of the Markstrat game prior to making your first round of decisions. We shall explore some alternative ways of organising your activities amongst group members.
  41. 41. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • explain the interdependence of marketing activities in creating a successful marketing strategy • understand the relationship of firm action and competitive action in creating marketing performance • explain the relationship between particular analytical tools and particular marketing decisions • use analysis and data to create reasonable expectations of intended marketing strategy and to form reasonable explanations of enacted marketing strategy • understand the impact of biases such as attribution error, sunk cost bias and herding on marketing strategy and firm evolution Segment 6: Marketing Strategy and Context This segment examines specific phenomena associated with innovation. These phenomena could be innovation in market offering or innovation in marketing activity, the challenges of managing and growing key marketing assets including brands, brand reputation and customer loyalty. Additionally, some strategies that use these assets in a distinctive way are also presented. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to: • Identify the opportunities and threats associated with both pioneering and following into new markets and the contextual factors that moderate these opportunities and threats • Explain the principles of value recombination and strategies based on this approach • Identify the opportunities and threats presented by alternative branding strategies and the steps management can take to increase opportunity and moderate risk Case Assignment The Black and Decker Corporation (A) Power Tools Division Author: Dolan, R.J. Case No.: 9-595-057 Date: 30 March 2001 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 7: Implementation and Control This segment looks at some of the reasons that explain how seemingly good strategies fail to pick up in the market. Also, how a marketing strategy can fail to deliver the intended benefits by not being able to position a product effectively is discussed. Three key challenges of marketing are explored, namely, what is the best way to implement a marketing strategy, what is the best way to assess a marketing performance and how marketing strategy should change with the change in consumer sentiment around it. Learning Outcomes: At the end of this segment, you should be able to • explain the barriers to the implementation of strategy and the associated actions that management can use to mitigate these barriers • identify alternative implementation strategies and the internal and external contexts that may make use of one such strategy preferable • explain the challenge of measuring marketing performance • suggest reasonable evaluation metrics and approaches for marketing strategies • analyse some consumerist perspectives and the risks these pose to firms in their marketing
  42. 42. • identify the type of firms best positioned to respond to current consumerist perspectives Case Assignment Sealed Air Corporation Author: Dolan, R.J. Case No.: 9-582-103 Date: 24 September 1985 Publisher: Harvard Business School Publishing Segment 8 : Assessment For your final project, you will write a marketing strategy case study. Your final assignment is to prepare an analysis of the marketing strategy of an organisation that you have not studied but you think has an effective marketing strategy. You should explain what the organisation’s marketing strategy is, what value it creates, how the strategy is supported by other business activities and what challenges it faces in the future.
  43. 43. Outline of MBA 750: Human Resources Management Textbook: Stone, R.J. Human Resource Management. 4th ed. Brisbane: John Wiley & Sons, 2002. All Required Readings will be available through the Library link. Synopsis This subject presents and analyses human resources management issues in a business organisation. Topics include the contribution to business development through human resource planning and management, employer and employee relations, and the implications for human resources management of the rapidly changing environment. Global and legal issues, recruitment and selection, training and development (including e-learning strategies), performance appraisal and reward systems are examined. The emphasis is on sensitizing students to the imperatives of managing human resources rather than preparing the average manager to become a human resources specialist. Segment 1: Introduction This segment includes subject-specific details such as the synopsis, the syllabus, the required readings and the assessment scheme. It also contains generic materials such as how to navigate the online content, tips on online communication as well as guidelines to analyse case studies. Segment 2: Why HRM Matters This segment explains what human resources management is and identifies key changes in economic environments and organisations and how these have increased the importance of effective HRM. In addition, it discusses the ethical and legal importance of good HRM and explains in general terms why HRM is so important in determining organisational effectiveness. Learning Outcomes: Upon completing the segment and assignment, students should be able to: • explain what human resource management is • identify key changes in economic environments and organisations and how these have increased the importance of effective HRM • identify the ethical and legal importance of good HRM • explain in general terms why HRM is so important in determining organisational effectiveness Segment 3: Managing People This segment surveys a range of issues related to drawing the best out of employees for the benefits of the organisation. Issues covered includes using the HR information systems, HR planning, recruitment and selection and compensation and benefits. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • demonstrate an understanding of the principles and practice of HR planning, including the role of HRIS • demonstrate an understanding of the main approaches to job and work design (including their respective strengths and weaknesses) and apply this understanding to the design of effective jobs and work systems
  44. 44. • demonstrate an understanding of the range of recruitment and selection techniques available and their respective strengths and weaknesses • demonstrate an understanding of the role of managers in supervision and performance management and in training and career development, and apply this understanding to the design of systems for appraisal and staff development • demonstrate an understanding of the role of compensation and benefits and apply this understanding to the design of compensation and benefit systems Case Assignment Great Wall Golf and Country Club Authors: Beamish, P.W. and D. Everatt Case No.: 900M03 Date: 28 June 2000 Publisher: Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario Segment 4: Managing Organisations This segment examines issues such as employee relations and change management which have to be managed at an organisational level more than at the individual or small group level, but are nonetheless essential to the effective management of HR. Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this segment, you should be able to • understand why conflict over pay and conditions is an enduring feature of most economies and how such conflict can be managed effectively to minimise disruption to production • demonstrate the ability to apply theories of organisational change to dealing with specific problems in organisational change • demonstrate the ability to apply theories of communication and negotiation to dealing with specific situations • demonstrate an understanding of the obligations of managers concerning employee health and safety and the capacity to design systems to manage health and safety issues Case Assignment Grupo Financiero Inverlat Authors: Lane, H., K. Slaughter and D. Campbell Case No.: 97L001 Date: 15 February 1997 Publisher: Richard Ivey School of Business, The University of Western Ontario Segment 5: HRM and Effectiveness This segment presents the main methods used in collecting and analysing data on HR practices and discusses the relative advantages and disadvantages of particular approaches. It also

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