Chap 7 fungi and other organism (human)

1,364 views

Published on

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,364
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
188
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Chap 7 fungi and other organism (human)

  1. 1. MYCOLOGY (MIC 206) FUNGI AND OTHERORGANISMS (HUMAN)
  2. 2. PARASITIC FUNGI AND HUMAN Mycoses: Any fungal disease. Tend to be chronic because fungi grow slowly. Mycoses are classified into the following categories (based on the level of penetration into the body tissues): 1) Systemic or deep mycoses, often fatal. 2) Cutaneous mycoses or dermatomycoses. 3) Subcutaneous mycoses. 4) Superficial mycoses. 5) Dimorphic systemic mycoses.
  3. 3. SYSTEMICMYCOSES
  4. 4. Systemic mycoses Fungal infections deep within the body. Can affect a number if tissues and organs. Usually caused by fungi that live in the soil and are inhaled. Examples: Histoplasmosis (Histoplasma capsulatum): Initial infection in lungs. Later spreads through blood to most organs. Coccidiomycosis (Coccidioides immites): Resembles tuberculosis.
  5. 5. Systemic Mycosis: Histoplasmosis Disseminated Histoplasma capsulatum, lung infection. Source: Microbiology Perspectives, 1999.
  6. 6. CUTANEOUSMYCOSES
  7. 7. Cutaneous mycoses Cutaneous mycoses: Fungal infections of the skin, hair, and nails. Secrete keratinase, an enzyme that degrades keratin. Infection is transmitted by direct contact or contact with infected hair (hair salon) or cells (nail files, shower floors). Examples: Ringworm (Tinea capitis and T. corporis) Athlete’s foot (Tinea pedis) Jock itch (Tinea cruris)
  8. 8. Tinea pedis (feet)
  9. 9. Cutaneous MycosisRingworm skin infection: Tinea Candida albicans infection ofcorporis the nails.Source: Microbiology Source: MicrobiologyPerspectives, 1999 Perspectives, 1999.
  10. 10. SUBCUTANEOUS MYCOSES
  11. 11. Subcutaneous mycoses Subcutaneous mycoses: Fungal infections beneath the skin. Caused by saprophytic fungi that live in soil or on vegetation. Infection occurs by implantation of spores or mycelial fragments into a skin wound. Can spread to lymph vessels.
  12. 12. Superficial mycoses Superficial mycoses: Infections of hair shafts and superficial epidermal cells. Prevalent in tropical climates.3 Genera of dermatophytes: Trichophyton (Hair, Skin, Nails) Microsporum (Skin, Hair) Epidermophyton (Skin, Nails)
  13. 13. Tinea capitis (scalp)
  14. 14. Epidermophyton floccosum Bifurcated hyphae with multiple, smooth, club shaped macroconidia (2-4 cells)
  15. 15. Dermatophyte Culture
  16. 16. OPPORTUNISTIC MYCOSES
  17. 17. Opportunistic mycoses Caused by organisms that are generally harmless unless individual has weakened defenses: AIDS and cancer patients Individuals treated with broad spectrum antibiotics Very old or very young individuals (newborns). Examples: Aspergillosis: Inhalation of Aspergillus spores. Yeast Infections or Candidiasis: Caused mainly by Candida albicans. Part of normal mouth, esophagus, and vaginal flora.
  18. 18. DIMORPHIC SYSTEMICMYCOSES
  19. 19. Dimorphic Systemic Mycoses Caused by dimorphic fungal pathogens (by changing their morphological form. Geographically restricted and the primary sites of infection is usually pulmonary, inhalation of conidia. Histoplasmosis: World-wide, espceially USA, sporadic cases do occur in Australia. Agent: Histoplasma capsulatum. Coccidioidomycosis Respiratory infections: Endemic in south-western USA, nothern mexico and various centres in South America. Agent: Coccidioides immitis.

×