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Pitch deck templates for seed capital next view ventures

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NextView pitch deck template for seed stage startups but a rputable US VC

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Pitch deck templates for seed capital next view ventures

  1. 1. Tw o V C - A p p r o ve d F o r ma t s f o r Ra i s i n g I n s t i t u t i o n a l S e e d Ca p i t a l Startup Pitch Deck T E M P L AT E S with commentary from the founding partners of
  2. 2. About These are NextView’s series of tactical resources for entrepreneurs, built specifically for seed-stage companies as part of NextView’s platform of startup support. For more, visit ViewFromSeed.com The leading seed-stage VC firm investing in internet and mobile startups on the East Coast. We focus exclusively on seed, all in service of our mission: Help founders give their companies the best possible start. NextView was founded in 2010 by Lee Hower (PayPal, LinkedIn, Point Judith Capital), David Beisel (About.com, Venrock) & Rob Go (eBay, Spark Capital).
  3. 3. These slides make pitch deck creation easier and more precise. • While each company is different, we included key pieces you should use, along with our opinions on what makes a great, investor-friendly pitch deck. • You should use these templates directionally -- don’t simply copy/paste the entire resource. This was built for early-stage startups raising seed capital. • This is not intended for use by startups seeking Series A or later rounds, as you will need to include different information and/or craft a different narrative to successfully reach these financial milestones. David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Throughout this resource, my partners and I offer some light commentary and opinions via these sticky notes. You’ll find them along the margins of a given slide.  Some copy is packaged in [blue and brackets] to be extra clear that it’s just placeholder and should be updated. How to Use This Resource
  4. 4. What Every Investor Wants Entrepreneurs to Know Pitch Decks 101
  5. 5. Mistakes to Avoid Don’t make the claim that you won’t need future funding after this round. • This is somewhat common for entrepreneurs to say. But if the business is truly great, you’re better off raising future capital so you can step on the gas. • Additionally, taking venture capital implies you’re trying to maximize growth and returns, so in most cases, you will actually want to raise additional capital. Claiming otherwise can hurt your credibility. Don’t under- or over-prepare. Both are surprisingly common pitfalls. • Many entrepreneurs fail to convey the basics (the who/what/why/how) early in the deck. Be sure you do so you can have a more productive discussion afterwards. Be careful not to underprepare. • Conversely, others will over-prepare, stuffing too much information into the deck and treating the meeting like a one-way transaction. In reality, you want a conversation to secure that next meeting. Always present your pitch with some kind of story arc. • The second template will explain more details about why this is important, but suffice to say that many failed pitches lack a compelling narrative and thus fall flat. Good pitches tell an authentic story. Always send your deck as a PDF. This avoids font and formatting issues.i
  6. 6. Goals to Keep in Mind The goal of your first investor meeting is NOT to secure funding. • Your very first goal is to secure the NEXT meeting. You want to get an investor excited and intrigued enough to perform some due diligence and convey that excitement to his or her partners. Play to your strengths and select the right pitch deck format for your situation. • In this resource, you’ll find two different formats: (1) a short deck with a long, “kitchen sink” appendix and (2) The Show, a story-driven format to be presented from start to finish. • You should use the deck that best aligns with your style and the specifics of your pitch meeting. Short Pitch + Long Appendix The Show Characteristics: • Critical info up front • Exhaustive appendix • Basic layout/design • Coherent story format • Highly visual • Driven by emotions Use Cases: • First meetings (typically much more conversational) • For those less comfortable as public speakers • One-way, end-to-end presenting to VCs • Typically better for good public speakers
  7. 7. A basic pitch deck outlining core details up front. Refer to the appendix as needed based on the conversation. Template 1: Pitch + Kitchen Sink FAQs
  8. 8. E x a m p l e C o m p a n y Confidential Investor Presentation January 2014
  9. 9. Executive Summary What We Do: • ExampleCo is a [zero-jargon description of product] used by [broad but addressable market] to [benefits]. • We are focused on the [$X billion target niche] market. Current Status: We are [company stage, e.g. pre-revenue, pre-launch, etc.]. Traction to date includes: • (Month or Quarter 1): X key metric, Y key metric • (Month or Quarter 2): X key metric, Y key metric Currently Raising: • [$X-Y million] seed round. • Previously raised [$X million] from [investors]. Team Experience Pilot Customers/Partners Logos of Past Companies & Top Schools Logos or Other Proof of Early Traction 2
  10. 10. Problem [The succinct problem statement you aim to address goes here. Use plain language – no jargon.] [Customer Tries Something] [Here’s Their Terrible Pain] [Existing Solutions Are Broken/Nonexistent] David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures To better illustrate your problem, as well as convey the emotional arc to someone who’s less immersed in it than you, consider adding some visual components such as these. 3
  11. 11. Solution Explanation of Actions Taken Explanation of Actions Taken Explanation of Outcomes 1-2 Product Screens [The succinct summary of the solution goes here. This often sounds like your company mission.] • [List a few key benefits and features here.] Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures There’s nothing worse for founders than getting deep into a pitch and realizing the investor has no clue what the product does. Now is the time for a short explanation or demo. 4
  12. 12. Go-To-Market In ONE slide, convey one or more of the following: 1. Your unfair distribution advantage – What’s the one thing that sets you apart when it comes to distribution? 2. Your initial customer/user acquisition strategy – What channels are you thinking about? What data can you share based on past tests? What tech integrations are you building? 3. Your initial marquee partners or customers, if applicable – Who are your earliest “true believers” that will help you gain traction and/or generate word-of-mouth? Who’s already in your camp that has a recognizable brand, history of success, or enough confidence in your company and product to partner or buy early on? 5 What to Know to Create Yours David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures This slide varies but the goal is the same: Show you’re thinking about (or have data or an unfair advantage in) distribution. This is too often overlooked in favor of tech alone.
  13. 13. Go-To-Market Total Addressable Market: [$XB industry] Distribution Strategy: [Your unique advantage + channels you plan to test Launch [Dates] Traction [Dates] Growth [Dates] Main Focus: Priority Tasks: Target Results: [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [X] [Launch web & iOS app] • [Improve signup flow • Finalize user referral process • Accepted to App Store • Drive initial signups • Measure DAU totals] • [X initial users • Convert X% of existing email list • Understand DAU & optimize] 5
  14. 14. Traction to Date • [Key Metric #1] • [Key Metric #2] • [Key Metric #3] Lee Hower Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Seed-stage investors understand there won’t be tons of traction just yet, but it’s important to convey a few data points and whatever loose proof you have that hints at success. 6
  15. 15. Looking Forward • We are seeking [$X]. • We aim to [major goals] in the next [timeframe]. Team Building Company Progress May June July Aug Sept Oct Hire A, B, C] Hire X, Y, Z Launch Goal Goal Goal 7
  16. 16. FAQs Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures This “kitchen sink” FAQ section is great for your first meeting. As the conversation unfolds, you can pull up a given slide. Due to that intended use, there’s no “right order.”
  17. 17. Team Headshot Headshot Name, Current Title Name, Current Title Past Company Logo • Title or Relevant Function • Impressive Achievement Past Company Logo • Title or Relevant Function • Impressive Achievement Past Company Logo • Title or Relevant Function • Impressive Achievement Past Company Logo • Title or Relevant Function • Impressive Achievement 9 Lee Hower Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Don’t use tons of copy here. Investors just want to get a general sense of the team: Are they seasoned vets? Scrappers with a fresh POV? This is important, but keep it brief.
  18. 18. Competition [Low Thing] [High Thing] [High Thing] [Low Thing] Logo Logo Logo Logo Logo We are stronger than the competition in [key differentiators]. We are threatened by the competition in [honest worries you have]. 10 David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Don’t kill yourself trying to force a slide that winds up meaningless in being overly positive. Instead, speak to how you’ll win against the most relevant two or three competitors.
  19. 19. Use of Proceeds Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 YEAR Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 YEAR Projected Headcount Projected Customers Revenue Salaries + Overhead Other (Professional Fees, Rent, Utilities, Travel, etc.) Cash Burn Total Cash Burn • Build team of [X] • [Biggest product milestone – e.g. launch beta in X months] • Product/market fit and [X customers/users] in [X] months Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Be thoughtful about projecting burn rate, since that’s how VCs think about finances. And definitely don’t try to project anything beyond two years. It’s just not reasonable. 11
  20. 20. Marketing Deep Dive In ONE slide, convey how you’ll drive growth through one of the following : 1. Your actual marketing funnel and results to date 2. Your product’s built-in growth drivers (referrals, network effects, etc.) 3. Proposed tactics you plan to deploy over time The Next 3 Slides Show Examples 12 What to Know to Create Yours Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures If this isn’t based on actual data, then propose how you’re thinking about it. We live in a demand-constrained world. The question to answer is how you’ll address that issue.
  21. 21. Marketing Deep Dive Example 1 of 3 [Description of Total Target Market] [Channel 1] [Channel 2] [Channel 3] [Conversion Action 1] (e.g. Lead, Free User, Trial, Demo, etc.) [Conversion 2 or Retention] (e.g. MQL, 1-7-30-Day Active Users, Critical/Sticky Feature Usage, etc.) Revenue LTV User Acquisition Conversion and/or Retention Monetization In Progress/Su cceeding (Continue to Optimize) Launch or Improve (Starting Soon) Test/Validat e Hypotheses (Starting Later) 12
  22. 22. Marketing Deep Dive Example 2 of 3 User Network Effects/Product Virality Context Context Context Context Product Feature Product Feature 12
  23. 23. Tactic Tactic Tactic Marketing Deep Dive Example 3 of 3 #Customers Time Tactic Tactic Tactic Tactic [X] Customers Tactic Tactic Path to [X] Customers 12
  24. 24. Traction Deep Dive • Data Point • Data Point • Data Point David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures My personal favorite approach to this slide is to show 3-4 graphs that convey that you have a pulse on your business and that you’re tracking a few different important metrics. 13
  25. 25. [ExampleCo makes X easier and cheaper.] [Save Time: ExampleCo does X for you] . [Save Money: X% more cost-effective on average.] How Customers Use [ExampleCo]: 1. [X] 2. [Y] 3. [Z] How It Works 14 Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures You’d be amazed at how often these slides fail to convey exactly how the product works. Keep things simple and jargon-free. Don’t dress it up too much, especially at the seed stage.
  26. 26. Product Screens 1 2 3 4 15
  27. 27. Product Roadmap Bucket1Bucket2Bucket3 May June July Aug Sept Oct Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone Milestone 16
  28. 28. Customer Validation Headshot Headshot Logo Logo “Quote.” “Quote.” Test Customer Logos • Proof of concept data point • Proof of concept data point • Proof of concept data point • Proof of concept data point 17
  29. 29. Revenue Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Year1 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Year2 Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Total Revenue $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Cost of goods sold Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Total COGs $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Gross Profit $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Gross Margin X% X% X% X% X% X% X% X% X% X% Expenses Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Item $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X Total Expenses $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X $X EBITDA ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) Other Income (Loss) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) Net Income (Loss) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) ($X) Financials/Budget David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures This is definitely a slide you need, but the purpose is NOT to have a crystal ball. Instead, show that you’ve given critical thought to the financial structure of your business. Lee Hower Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Be sure to sanity check your numbers and your margins. Don’t make the mistake of pitching a business that projects to have the best margins and growth EVER. 18
  30. 30. Unit Economics (Showing [X] months trailing.) Averages Meetings/Events Booked X Rental Rate $X Utilization X% Revenue for Venue $X Commission % X% Gross Revenue $X Cost Channel/Partnerships Direct Acquisition Cost-per-lead -- $X Partner Commission $X -- Service Agent $X $X Net Revenue $X $X Margin % X% X% Example: A Venue Booking Service [Provide context for a given item as needed] 19 David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Seed-stage companies may not have the history to show granular unit economics. Instead, fill in the data you have and hypothesize or cite comparable companies for the rest.
  31. 31. Market Size/Trends [$XB ] total market opportunity [$XB] Go-to- Market Related Data Points • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) • Data point/statement (Source) Lee Hower Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Check the slide notes below for helpful links on each topic: the idea of total addressable market (versus just the total market), as well as top- down and bottom-up analyses. 20 Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures Next, you’ll want to list both top- down and bottoms-up market data, along with a cogent story for each. Above all, make sure that both of these analyses generally align. David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures There’s a lot to say about this slide, so all three of us will weigh in. First, don’t just sell the big number. List the total addressable market, i.e. the portion you can reasonably serve.
  32. 32. Exit Comparisons Startup Buyer acq. by [$X] VC VC Startup Buyer acq. by [$X] VC VC Startup Buyer acq. by [$X] VC VC Public Co [market cap] Public Co [market cap] Public Co [market cap] • Startups in the [industry niche] space are acquisition targets for companies such as [Examples], at valuations around [N] times price/sale. 21
  33. 33. Partners/Biz Dev Logos of Early Partners Logos of Future Potential Partners Current Partners: Target Partners: 22
  34. 34. Monetization David Beisel Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures If there are many moving pieces, a flowchart is most helpful to show exchange of values and dollars. In B2B, show or list where the money comes from. In B2C, list hypotheses. [B2B SaaS Business Model] [Sales Strategy: Free trial and bottom-up selling] [Pricing: $X to $Y per user per month] [Operating Margins: Over X%] 23 Example: B2B SaaS
  35. 35. Challenges/Risks • [Challenge #1 – context] • [Challenge #2 – context] • [Challenge #3 – context] Rob Go Co-Founder & Partner NextView Ventures What keeps you up at night? Though this may seem counterintuitive to state so overtly, every startup has challenges, and investors want to see how you’re thinking about them. 24
  36. 36. Why Now? Trend, Factor, or Data Point Trend, Factor, or Data Point Trend, Factor, or Data Point Trend, Factor, or Data Point icon icon iconicon 25
  37. 37. A visual, emotionally-driven deck to craft and deliver a complete, compelling story. Template 2: The Show
  38. 38. The Show is an alternative to the more traditional pitch deck style. • The Show is perfect for entrepreneurs aiming to tell a compelling, start-to-finish story. • Compared to the previous template, this deck should be presented in its entirety with minimal interruption or tangential discussion. • Depending on your personal presentation style and abilities, The Show can be great for group pitches. Note the following “meta” approach to teaching you The Show. • There’s no exact template for creating The Show, since it’s so specific to your own story. As a result, we’ve created an example of this style pitch deck by pitching a fake product: The Show. • Thus, the following slides will help you get a sense of the emotional feel of this style, and the copy itself will overtly talk about it too, since that’s our “product.” (Meta, we know.) What Is The Show? Look for these call-out boxes to learn more about a particular slide. These exist OUTSIDE the actual story arc (i.e. it’s our attempt at stepping back to analyze a slide). They’re not part of the pitch.
  39. 39. Confidential Investor Presentation January 2015 The ShowTell Your Seed-Stage Startup’s Story. Better.
  40. 40. Confidential Investor Presentation January 2015 The Show Remember: We’re about to present this template to you as if The Show is the startup being pitched. Thus, the slides that follow will convey both the emotional style of this type of pitch AND some tactical details of what you should include in your own version of The Show. Tell Your Seed-Stage Startup’s Story. Better.
  41. 41. Confidential Investor Presentation January 2015 The Show (Still with us on the meta approach? Good. Now, quite literally, on with The Show…) Remember: We’re about to present this template to you as if The Show is the startup being pitched. Thus, the slides that follow will convey both the emotional style of this type of pitch AND some tactical details of what you should include in your own version of The Show. Tell Your Seed-Stage Startup’s Story. Better.
  42. 42. is an investor pitch deck template that guides an audience through a compelling story and helps entrepreneurs more successfully raise seed capital. The Show 2
  43. 43. is an investor pitch deck template that guides an audience through a compelling story and helps entrepreneurs more successfully raise seed capital. The Show As with any style pitch deck, you should articulate the basics of WHAT you do up front. Founders fail to convey this surprisingly often, which derails your pitch immediately. Don’t forget to include this simple yet critical detail early in your own story. 2
  44. 44. What we’ve observed: 3
  45. 45. What we’ve observed: After conveying the basics of WHAT you do, it’s now time to tell the main story: WHY you exist. This is what makes The Show so effective – it tells a compelling story, with you at the center. 3
  46. 46. What we’ve observed: After conveying the basics of WHAT you do, it’s now time to tell the main story: WHY you exist. This is what makes The Show so effective – it tells a compelling story, with you at the center. Note that all compelling stories, from nursery rhymes to Shakespeare to your pitch, can break down into THREE parts, which we’ll discuss… 3
  47. 47. What we’ve observed: Web and mobile entrepreneurship is in vogue and growing fast. As a result, more entrepreneurs are pitching more VCs. 4
  48. 48. What we’ve observed: Web and mobile entrepreneurship is in vogue and growing fast. As a result, more entrepreneurs are pitching more VCs. Compelling Story, Part 1: A status quo. What is the state of things historically or today? For a pitch, the status quo is the observation you’ve made about the market that will inevitably lead to Part 2 of your story… 4
  49. 49. Problem Unfortunately, many startup pitches are broken. They’re ineffective and fail to convince VCs to invest. 5
  50. 50. Problem Unfortunately, many startup pitches are broken. They’re ineffective and fail to convince VCs to invest. Compelling Story, Part 2: Conflict. A problem is encountered by the “hero” of your story. In your case, that’s your customer, NOT your company 5
  51. 51. Problem Unfortunately, many startup pitches are broken. They’re ineffective and fail to convince VCs to invest. But the status quo alone isn’t enough. It must lead to a problem. No problem, no product. No product, no company. You want to really hammer home this idea of the problem you solve, so we’ll dedicate a few more slides to just that… 5 Compelling Story, Part 2: Conflict. A problem is encountered by the “hero” of your story. In your case, that’s your customer, NOT your company
  52. 52. Why do pitches fail? During the seed-stage, many pitches exhibit the same issue… 6
  53. 53. Problem They lack a compelling story. 7
  54. 54. Problem They lack a compelling story.This happens for one of two reasons… 8
  55. 55. 1. Some pitches are B A R R E N 9
  56. 56.  Not enough content. 10
  57. 57.  Not enough content.  Not crystal clear on WHAT they do. 11
  58. 58.  Not enough content.  Not crystal clear on WHAT they do.  No overt ask for capital. 12
  59. 59.  Not enough content.  Not crystal clear on WHAT they do.  No overt ask for capital.  No stated plan post-fundraise. 13
  60. 60.  Not enough content.  Not crystal clear on WHAT they do.  No overt ask for capital.  No stated plan post-fundraise.  Not clear why this is “inevitable.” 14
  61. 61.  Not enough content.  Not crystal clear on WHAT they do.  No overt ask for capital.  No stated plan post-fundraise.  Not clear why this is “inevitable.” All of this only confuses and frustrates investors. 15
  62. 62. 2. Some pitches are C L U T T E R E D 16
  63. 63.  Too much copy. 17
  64. 64.  Too much copy.  Too many details (vs. the KEY details) 18
  65. 65.  Too much copy.  Too many details (vs. the KEY details)  Not delivered as a compelling story. 19
  66. 66.  Too much copy.  Too many details (vs. the KEY details)  Not delivered as a compelling story. These are hard to follow. The story gets lost in all the noise. 20
  67. 67.  Too much copy.  Too many details (vs. the KEY details)  Not delivered as a compelling story. (As an aside, you should be picking up on the style of The Show by now: short, clear statements, presented in a single, connected story.) These are hard to follow. The story gets lost in all the noise. 20
  68. 68. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 21
  69. 69. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 22
  70. 70. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 1. We’re the people to do it. 23
  71. 71. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 1. We’re the people to do it. 1. It’s already happening. 24
  72. 72. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 1. We’re the people to do it. 1. It’s already happening. The problem is truly painful and the opportunity is huge. 25
  73. 73. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 1. We’re the people to do it. 1. It’s already happening. The problem is truly painful and the opportunity is huge. Your team has the talent and the unfair advantages to win. 26
  74. 74. Instead, the goal is to convey 3 things: 1. This matters. 1. We’re the people to do it. 1. It’s already happening. The problem is truly painful and the opportunity is huge. Your team has the talent and the unfair advantages to win. Early traction hints at much bigger success in the future. 27
  75. 75. Solution Compelling stories convey exactly that. 28
  76. 76. The Showto help entrepreneurs easily create the most compelling stories possible. We’re building 29
  77. 77. The Show We’re building Compelling Story, Part 3: Resolution. You’ve laid out the status quo of what’s happening, as well as the resulting problem. The resolution to that problem comes next. It should lead neatly into an “oh, by the way” moment... 29 to help entrepreneurs easily create the most compelling stories possible.
  78. 78. The Show We’re building Compelling Story, Part 3: Resolution. You’ve laid out the status quo of what’s happening, as well as the resulting problem. The resolution to that problem comes next. It should lead neatly into an “oh, by the way” moment... Putting it all together: “We’ve observed X, which creates problem Y. The solution is Z, and oh, by the way, that’s exactly what we’re creating.” Investors want to believe you are the inevitable resolution to this story. 29 to help entrepreneurs easily create the most compelling stories possible.
  79. 79. The Show We’re building Compelling Story, Part 3: Resolution. You’ve laid out the status quo of what’s happening, as well as the resulting problem. The resolution to that problem comes next. It should lead neatly into an “oh, by the way” moment... Next, outline why you’re the best team to provide it. 29 to help entrepreneurs easily create the most compelling stories possible. Putting it all together: “We’ve observed X, which creates problem Y. The solution is Z, and oh, by the way, that’s exactly what we’re creating.” Investors want to believe you are the inevitable resolution to this story.
  80. 80. What we realized by testing The Show… 30
  81. 81. Why Stories Succeed Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. 1 31
  82. 82. Why Stories Succeed 1 You’ll want to speak to each point. For #1, we’d add this: “Investors make decisions using both of these things. But unless you’re a world-class storyteller that can make plain slides come to life, regular slides won’t cut it. The Show is more adept at targeting both the head (Is this a smart business? Can it scale and make money?) and the gut (Am I excited about this? Does this feel huge?). Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. 31
  83. 83. Why Stories Succeed 1 Stories convey the WHY. Young startups lack a history of proof but have plenty of purpose. 2 Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. 32
  84. 84. Why Stories Succeed 1 “This is the driving factor behind your pitch. If you’re launching to simply make money, most investors won’t actually get excited. At NextView, for example, we look for ‘authentic’founders – people who identify a problem and understand their why, their mission. When things get tough or challenges arise, as they always do, these founders will run through walls to keep building their businesses. The Show effectively conveys this sense of purpose and succeed-at-all-costs mentality.” 2 Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. Stories convey the WHY. Young startups lack a history of proof but have plenty of purpose. 32
  85. 85. Why Stories Succeed 1 2 Stories have high impact in little time. Maximize your short pitch meetings. 3 Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. Stories convey the WHY. Young startups lack a history of proof but have plenty of purpose. 33
  86. 86. Why Stories Succeed 1 2 “Stories shed light on things two sides might have in common, like shared purpose or common interests. Seed VCs invest in people much more than they invest in business plans and ideas. The Show delivers a story that can quickly get investors excited about the opportunity. If structured properly, The Show also doesn’t require a lot of time to reach that end result. This fits within the constraints of a pitch meeting and allows for important follow-up questions after.” Stories target the head and the gut. Investors make decisions with both. Stories have high impact in little time. Maximize your short pitch meetings. 3 Stories convey the WHY. Young startups lack a history of proof but have plenty of purpose.
  87. 87. • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof Early Results 34
  88. 88. • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof Stories were the most effective means for generating a positive response from investors. Early Results 35
  89. 89. • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof • Data Point/Proof Stories were the most effective means for generating a positive response from investors. Early Results Note that this slide should present just a few key data points and perhaps a powerful statement, quote, or conclusion. In addition to the short list of data points, provide context verbally, e.g., “For comparison, Famous Company A gets X results, making ours better by Y.” 35
  90. 90. for achieving traction and distribution Our Unfair Advantage 36
  91. 91. Not only should the story in your pitch present your company as the inevitable resolution, it should drive home the “unfair advantage” every investor seeks in entrepreneurs when it comes to actually gaining traction. It’s not just about building something worth using – it’s about growth. for achieving traction and distribution Our Unfair Advantage 36
  92. 92. Our Unfair Advantage 1 2 Our Advantage: Context Our Advantage: Context 37
  93. 93. Our Unfair Advantage 1 Maybe you have an exclusive partnership with a big brand. Maybe your team boasts a truly connected, all-star cast. Whatever the unfair advantage(s) is/are for your company, articulate that loudly and proudly. These are the factors that help investors see you will not only succeed in general but will succeed early and often. (Note that this is mainly about distribution.) Our Advantage: Context 37 2 Our Advantage: Context
  94. 94. Years 1-2: $X Billion Market Opportunity 38
  95. 95. Years 1-2: $X Billion Market Opportunity Growth into Larger $Y Billion Market 38
  96. 96. Raise $N Million in Seed 18-Month Plan 38
  97. 97. Raise $N Million in Seed Grow X Part of Business 18-Month Plan 39
  98. 98. Raise $N Million in Seed Grow X Part of Business Achieve Z Key Results 18-Month Plan 40
  99. 99. Raise $N Million in Seed Grow X Part of Business Achieve Z Key Results Remember, you should be prepared to speak more to each point in your pitch. Otherwise, it can feel like a gross oversimplification. For this slide, you should demonstrate that you understand the key levers you need to pull to gain traction and successfully reach your Series A round or other milestones. 18-Month Plan 40
  100. 100. David Beisel Jay Acunzo Rob GoLee Hower Our Team deep expertise and decades of combined experience in raising/investing seed capital 41
  101. 101. The Show Our mission is to help entrepreneurs everywhere tell better stories to succeed. Contact: example@example.com 555-555-5555 ViewFromSeed.com @NextViewVC
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