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TOTAL POLICING
History
COP GEAR
We spend a day with
the classic car fleet
Public promise
VICTIM CARE
Are we delivering a be...
You need the experts
in police divorce
on your side.
Slater&Gordon(UK)LLPisauthorisedandregulatedbytheSolicitorsRegulation...
thejob
This has been a very
exciting, action-packed
issue to put together.
We spent time at
Heathrow Airport getting to kn...
4 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
137 new Special Constables attended
The Peel Centre in August for one
of the largest att...
UPDATE 5
1.5 million pounds has been saved
because the Met Volunteer VIIDO Unit
completed 500 investigations in the past
y...
6 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
MET
TIMES
A bit of history and some lighter news
from around the Met...
Historical Car C...
MET TIMES 7
the New Forest for a traffic officer’s
funeral.
The vehicles can be booked by
police officers and staff for pr...
8 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
Historical Car Collection
1979
Land Rover 109 Defender
1983
Rover SD1 V8 SE Automatic
20...
policecu.co.uk
More than 21,000
members use our services
Loans,
big and
small
www.policecu.co.uk
Life Cover*
at no extra c...
10 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
A few facts about
our airport team...
SO18: FROM EAST TO WEST
Did you know that SO18
co...
SO18 11
70
NEW TRICKS
A successful operation against taxi touts
recently featured BME officers dressed
in Ethiopian garb p...
12 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
tasking process. This new
team will provide a platform
for our officers to exchange
ski...
SO18 13
BASS training
SO18 officers
receive training in
the Behavioural
Assessment Screening
System, which helps
spot a po...
14 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE SO18
trade by day near the
terminals.
Vulnerable people, who we
might otherwise never k...
BUREAUCRACY 15
Reducing
bureaucracy has
long been a focus…
UK-WIDE DRIVE
The drive to cut bureaucracy from
policing is mor...
16 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
Here are a few key
facts and figures....
PHASED ROLLOUT
The first 16 boroughs went live w...
MET CHANGE 17
80
FRESH FACES ON OUR TEAMS
Planners knew that the new model would
be short 1,000 officers but teams are
alr...
18 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
Here are some good
stories to come out
of the operation...
CROYDON
Croydon officers man...
SAFER PLACES 19
19
GOOD RESULTS FOR MERTON
Seven per cent of Merton residents are
concerned about ASB, down from 21 per
ce...
20 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE SAFER PLACES
« affect neighbourhoods
overall,” explains Commander
Chishty. “People who ...
WOULDTHEWOMAN INYOUR
LIFE LIKE A DIAMOND STUD IN
HER CHRISTMAS STOCKING?
Call us first – for a private appointment
ALAN BIC...
22 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
Here is some of
the best practice
currently in use...
VICTIM CARE CARDS
Should be avail...
TOTAL VICTIM CARE 23
80%
SHARE THE RESULTS
Be sure that victim survey comments are
shared with any relevant officers throu...
24 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
Our charity partner helps victims pick up the pieces after a crime
and plays an importa...
Membership at No1 CopperPot is exclusive
to the Police Family and it’s free to join.
Tel: 0845 130 1852
Join Now
www.no1co...
26 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE
PERSONALITIES, TEAMS AND CHALLENGES
GAELS JUST
WANNA HAVE FUNThe Met’s Gaelic football ...
MET PEOPLE 27
An NI officer goes
back home...
In another ‘first’ for relations across the Irish Sea,
Met officers were depl...
*Test drives are subject to status and availability.
Affinity Tel: 0845 051 7853
Email: londoncorporate@sytner.co.uk
http:/...
MET PEOPLE 29
GettyImages,Shutterstock
Met angling
team hooks
the trophy
The Met Police Sea Angling Club is
celebrating af...
The Job WP Guide.indd 1 17/09/2013 14:12
FORUM 31
Illustration:SundeepBhui.Photos:©MetropolitanPoliceHeritageCentre.Shutterstock
A question about cost
Dear Sir, I ...
32 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE WANT TO KNOW
Need to knowwant to know YOUR REGULAR GUIDE
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The Job - Metropolitan Police

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The Job - Metropolitan Police

  1. 1. TOTAL POLICING History COP GEAR We spend a day with the classic car fleet Public promise VICTIM CARE Are we delivering a better service to victims of crime? OCTOBER/NOVEMBER2013 thejob THE MAGAZINE FOR LONDON’S FINEST New agreements with the Border Force mean we’re truly working on the same team B P H H O O I E R L T I D I N E S S G E C G W H R I N T B P H H E I G H T S I T S N E W O L I C I N G O D E RR job 01 Cover V3 The Job68.indd 1 24/09/2013 11:35
  2. 2. You need the experts in police divorce on your side. Slater&Gordon(UK)LLPisauthorisedandregulatedbytheSolicitorsRegulationAuthorityandtheFinancialConductAuthorityforinsurancemediationactivity. Ourunrivalledexpertiseofpolicepensionscombinedwiththe EJTDPVOUFEQBDLBHFTXFP FSQPMJDFP DFSTBOEQFSTPOOFM meanswearetheonlychoicewhenyouneedafamilylawyer. 0VSOFUXPSLPGP DFTNFBOTUIBUXFBSFUIFOBUJPOBMĂSN thatisalwayscloseby. 8FP FS1PMJDF'FEFSBUJPONFNCFST 1PMJDFQFSTPOOFM Afreeinitialappointmentatatime&venueconvenientforyou Alocalfamilylawrepresentativeforyourarea Discountedrates Fixedfeesacrossallfamilylawservices Contactustoday: 0808 175 7725 TMBUFSHPSEPO DP VL NFUQPMJDFGBNJMZ I have had an experience that I would not wish to repeat around my divorce but the Slater & Gordon lawyer on my case has been with me every step of the way, friendly with excellent advice and service. It has been my lawyer who has seen me through this and kept me focused and sure of the outcome. MrMattin, PoliceFamilylawclient2013 0VS 'BNJMZ -BX 4FSWJDFT Policepensionsondivorce Divorce Financialdisputes upondivorce Childrenissues- Contact&residence Civilpartnerships Cohabitationissues& unmarriedpropertydisputes Pre&postnuptialagreements Injunctions 0 DFT /BUJPOXJEF #JSNJOHIBN #SJTUPM $BSEJ London,Manchester,MiltonKeynes, /FXDBTUMF 4IF FME 8BLFĂFME &EJOCVSHI BTTPDJBUFEP DF '*9&% '&&4"DSPTT BMMGBNJMZ MBXTFSWJDFT H1960_PFPension_TheJob_A5_AW.indd 1 13/08/2013 10:27
  3. 3. thejob This has been a very exciting, action-packed issue to put together. We spent time at Heathrow Airport getting to know the SO18 team, which launched a new co-operative team with the Border Force in September, and their officers now have direct access to an unprecedented amount of territory and intelligence. London is very international, and what happens at our airports affects our boroughs. I hope our piece inspires clever ways of working with SO18 to fight local crime. We also visited Hampton to photograph the Met’s Historical Vehicle Collection. While a lot of Met history exists in photos and documents, these perfectly maintained vehicles remind us how important volunteers are to the organisation. Lastly, we spent a day in Brent touring its neighbourhoods and seeing how it did its bit for the London-wide Safer Places Operation. They’re a great bunch of people over there and I can see why they’re doing so well in reducing anti-social behaviour. Thanks for reading and we’ll see you in December. Steve DeVries, Editor 10 ON THE BORDER The Heathrow Joint Policing Team 1506 RED TAPE How we’re cutting it MET TIMES The Met’s very cool classic cars Published by Seven for the Metropolitan Police Service, Directorate of Media and Communication, New Scotland Yard. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the permission of the editor. October/November 2013. © Metropolitan Police Authority 2013. Seven, 3-7 Herbal Hill, London EC1R 5EJ. Tel: 020 7775 7775. Fax: 020 7775 7705. Email The Job via Aware. The advertisements featured in The Job are those of the advertisers and are not endorsed by the Metropolitan Police Service (MPS). Editor Steve DeVries 020 7775 5734 steven.devries@ seven.co.uk Art Director Sundeep Bhui Picture Editor Nicola Duffy Deputy Picture Editor Louise Fenerci Chief Sub Steve McCubbin Deputy Chief Sub Chris Ryder Senior Sub Graeme Allen Production Manager Elizabeth Knipe Senior Account Manager Andrew Tkaczyk Creative Director Michael Booth Editorial Director Peter Dean Managing Director Jessica Gibson Chief Executive Sean King Chairman Tim Trotter Advertising Doris Consearo 020 7775 5714 ISSUE 68 Cover shoot by David Vintiner TOTAL POLICING History COP GEAR We spend a day with the classic car fleet Public promise VICTIM CARE Are we delivering a better service to victims of crime? OCTOBER/NOVEMBER2013 thejob THE MAGAZINE FOR LONDON’S FINEST New agreements with the UK Border Force mean we’re truly working on the same team B P H H O O I E R L T I D I N E S S G E C G W H R I N T 22 VICTIMS FIRST Total Victim Care is working 16 MET CHANGE How did the LPM launch go? 18 SAFER PLACES ASB was the summer focus GAELIC FOOTIE Our team heads to Dublin26 NEW 03 Contents V2 The Job68.indd 3 20/09/2013 14:33
  4. 4. 4 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE 137 new Special Constables attended The Peel Centre in August for one of the largest attestation ceremonies the Met has held since the end of the Second World War. Two years at the helm Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe marked two years as Met Commissioner on 26 September. His vision of Total Policing continues to be rolled out across the Met. EXISTING OFFICERS AND transferees will continue to receive subsidised travel for another four years when the current ATOC contract ends in March 2014. But the scheme will not be open to new constable recruits and is still not available to Met staff. “We still have to hit the savings targets we’ve been set but recognise the importance that officers place on subsidised travel, particularly at a time of rising costs of living and changes to terms and conditions,” says Robin Wilkinson, HR Director. “The amount the Met pays for the contract cannot increase, so while we’ll try to keep the cost to officers as low as possible in 2014/15, we do expect it to increase gradually year on year. But whatever the cost, it will be significantly less than what many people have to pay for their season ticket. “The costs can’t be finalised until contract negotiations are complete. We also have to understand the tax implications of the scheme for individuals, specifically the split between personal versus business travel. This might influence the contribution an officer has to make, or incur a taxable benefit, so clearly we need to understand this. We don’t want to negotiate a great travel scheme and then find that there are unforeseen tax implications.” Q To provide input on the discussions with HRMC on the tax situation look out for the travel survey that will be issued shortly. ATOCTO CONTINUE,BUT WITHSOME CHANGES Shutterstock 04-05 News The Job68.indd 4 18/09/2013 06:12
  5. 5. UPDATE 5 1.5 million pounds has been saved because the Met Volunteer VIIDO Unit completed 500 investigations in the past year. It provides playable footage and court “story discs” for all manner of crimes. Wheelie good news A record number of people have taken part in the Met’s Exchanging Places bike education programme, with the 10,000th person receiving a free bike recently. New ‘Lite’ tool creates basic CAD messages A NEW WEB-BASED tool named CAD Lite is now available, allowing anyone with a Foundation account to create basic CAD messages from their terminal. It is primarily aimed at Response Team Officers or CJU staff, but can be used by anyone without any formal CAD training. It reduces the demand placed on Central Command Centre (CCC) by calling 133. Currently a CAD can only be made for: Q An arrest enquiry Q A bail enquiry Q CCTV evidence to be viewed/seized Q Court warnings Q A missing persons debrief. Please allow an Officer to call: Q Section 18 search Q Warrant execution. The CAD will automatically be graded with an ‘S’ response for review in terms of deployment priority by the CCC Controller. When you open CAD Lite from Web Based Tools, your warrant or pay number will be recorded on the CAD created. SAVEONHALFTERMFUN WITHMETBENEFITS Register at www.met-benefits.co.uk with your scheme ID 0207 Escape with… Entertain the kids with.. Save on Halloween treats 10%OFF Superbreak event packages 10%OFF a break with Cottage Stay UK in either cottages or villas at the coast or countryside 10%OFF Haven, with free activities and entertainment 35%OFF entry to The London Dungeon 25%OFF entry to the SEA LIFE London Aquarium 50%OFF standard admission price to Paradise Wildlife Park with your Vectis Discount Card 20%discount on My Sweetie Jar’s sweets, hampers, jars and gifts 10%discount on Thorntons orders over £25 THE COLLEGE OF Policing is hosting a conference on two separate dates to explain what it’s all about. The one-day events in October are free to attend and are open to all ranks. The first will be in Ryton, near Coventry, on 16 October, and then repeated at Bramshill, Hampshire on 24 October. Attendees will learn what the college does and get the chance to provide feedback. Meet the College of Policing To register, please email events@college.pnn. police.uk. Accommodation available the night before, if required. Ô 04-05 News The Job68.indd 5 18/09/2013 06:12
  6. 6. 6 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE MET TIMES A bit of history and some lighter news from around the Met... Historical Car Collection Tucked away next to the now- closed Hampton Police Station is a real Aladdin's Cave. A rolling gate opens to reveal the Met’s first built traffic garage. It’s the ideal home for the Met’s collection of vintage vehicles, all parked in a workshop on the first level. This is a car lover’s paradise, with classic road signs splayed across the wall and the smells of exhaust and oil hanging in the air. “The vehicles here are maintained by a small team of officers, ex- officers and volunteers,” explains Detective Constable Rob Hill of the local Road Death Investigation Unit. He refers to the oldest car in the collection, the Wolseley 18/85, which came into service in 1948. Retired traffic officer John Dorsett has led an incredible restoration on it, with an interior that’s like new, fresh chrome and a finish that makes this glorious vehicle look like it has rolled off the assembly line. “When it’s ready, this will probably be used for a lot of special occasions, like weddings,” says DC Hill. Many of the cars in the collection are used for special events, like weddings. The heavily armoured 1973 Rover P6 – once Margaret Thatcher’s protection car, and used in The Iron Lady movie – recently made a trip to 1948 Wolseley 18/85 1970 Morris Minor 1000 Panda 06-08 HIstory V2 The Job68.indd 6 18/09/2013 20:05
  7. 7. MET TIMES 7 the New Forest for a traffic officer’s funeral. The vehicles can be booked by police officers and staff for private use for a reasonable fee, and DC Hill arrived at his own wedding in the 1970 Morris Minor 1000 Panda Car. It could once reach a top speed of 76 mph. In its heyday, it was used as a supervisor’s car to check on local beat patrols – far removed from the days of grip and pace centres. Its younger brother, the 1973 Austin 1100 MKII Panda, was used in a 1973 Austin 1100 MKII Panda 1973 Rover P6 1976 Triumph 2500 PI The vehicles here are maintained by officers, ex-officers and volunteers Crimewatch reconstruction of a newsagent's murder in Sutton in 1976. Another car in the collection is a 1983 Rover SD1, believed to be the last surviving traffic car of its kind. With its powerful V8 engine it once patrolled the motorways and fast roads around Greater London. Sitting rather forlornly at the back of the garage is an undriveable 1976 Triumph 2500. Known as the Mickey Mouse car for its twin mounted spotlights, these had a poor performance record, often destroying their own petrol injection systems. The collection has half a dozen motorbikes, including the lead one used in Princess Diana's funeral. 06-08 HIstory The Job68.indd 7 18/09/2013 07:00
  8. 8. 8 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE Historical Car Collection 1979 Land Rover 109 Defender 1983 Rover SD1 V8 SE Automatic 2013 Volvo ANPR Traffic Care Liver and let live It wasn’t long ago that the Met actually helped with blood runs and transferring live organs for quick transplant. But in 1987, one of these deliveries became one of the most famous in Met history. Known as the Met Liver Run, the officers had just over 30 minutes to drive a liver to Cromwell Hospital 27 miles away. There, patient Aliza Hillel, who had been rejecting her recently replaced liver, was waiting in surgery. Problems dogged the effort from the beginning. Fog had delayed the plane that was flying it to Stansted Airport, leaving very little time to get it to the hospital. The Met’s chopper was grounded after almost crashing from technical failure days before. So it was left to two Met cars to make the journey. The route would take them across London on a busy Friday afternoon. PC William McIntyre drove the lead car that was carrying the liver, with PC Graham Fordham as his co-driver. Behind them, PC Les Crossland drove the back-up car, which included a video camera, with PC Steve McCabe. The Met officers accepted the specially packaged liver from an Essex Police car that had driven it 12 miles from Stansted to Junction 7 on the M11. Through the amazing coordination of Met resources, other officers cleared the roads ahead so the drivers could speed through places like The City, Embankment, Trafalgar Square, The Mall, Hyde Park Corner and The Cromwell Road. They made it to the hospital with just five minutes to spare, and in the end Ms Hillel survived. Welcome the vehicles of 2013 The marked cars and vans in the new fleet have… A slimline, high-intensity LED light bar that improves visibility and fuel efficiency The latest reflective fluorescent materials in Battenburg-patterned livery Force radio with timed and momentary hands-free facilities A data recorder that monitors the vehicle’s motion and uses GPS to provide detailed information when a vehicle-related incident occurs On the traffic cars, station vans and area cars, mobile data terminals which are interfaced with the ANPR system to direct all information through a single screen and keyboard for ergonomic working and to minimise information overload on the driver Mobile data terminals that provide vehicle location, CAD information, mapping and access to various intelligence databases A central control unit to manage power-sharing across the police equipment to ensure the load on the vehicle battery is minimised, where possible A run-lock system which allows the vehicle to be secured with the engine running, where necessary. In addition… Incident response vehicles have a separate gateway radio to relay communications from hand-held radios through the vehicle into the Airwave network when in areas of poor coverage. The gateway system is guided through voice instruction. Station van The detention area minimises opportunities for injury and self-harm and gives a good view of the detainee. The new fleet includes (approx) Q 450 Incident Response Vehicles Q 16 Traffic 4x4s Q 90 Station Vans Q 60 Area Cars Q 90 Traffic Cars AllisterThorpe,GettyImages 06-08 HIstory V2 The Job68.indd 8 19/09/2013 19:56
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  10. 10. 10 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE A few facts about our airport team... SO18: FROM EAST TO WEST Did you know that SO18 covers London City and Heathrow Airport? SMILE FOR THE CAMERA! Our officers can access 4,500 CCTV cameras around Heathrow and have the biggest ANPR presence in the Met. UP AND AWAY! There's a lot you might not know about our Aviation Security Command, and new changes at the border mean better policing for everyone... From many of London’s western suburbs you can see the lights of planes coming in to land at Heathrow. They originate from around the globe – 180 destinations across 80 countries. Considering that each one could contain between 100 and 500 passengers, it’s amazing to fathom the number of people who travel through Heathrow every day – 191,000 on average. With a fixed population of tens of thousands, local businesses, miles of roads, infrastructure and buildings of all sizes spread over a 12 sq km area, the airport is a unique policing environment requiring a diverse range of activities. The wider remit for Heathrow – and London City Airport – is the responsibility of SO18. This is a remit that has changed from not just solely a protective security operation, but one that consists of regular reactive and proactive work, ever- sophisticated methods of detection and, more important than ever, new partnership arrangements that will make UK border security stronger than ever. The new structure of the Met recognises that crime doesn’t respect borders. SO18’s territory is no different – criminality in this environment can have a national and international dimension. A first for border policing Last month, for the first time, SO18 and the Border Force pooled resources to create the new ‘Heathrow Joint Policing Team’. It gives our officers joint powers to deal with crime that affects the airport, London and the UK. “It is the Government’s desire to police the border differently to how we have in the past,” says Detective Chief Inspector Ravern Stevens. “Over the past two years we T S T L H K H I E Y E M ’ I S T T S L T K I H Y M E ’ I S T H E 10-14 Heathrow Cops V3 The Job68.indd 10 24/09/2013 11:36
  11. 11. SO18 11 70 NEW TRICKS A successful operation against taxi touts recently featured BME officers dressed in Ethiopian garb posing as tourists. SO15 CLOSE AT HAND Our Counter-Terrorism branch also has a presence at Heathrow, conducting daily work to keep the public safe. million people pass through Heathrow Airport every year. tackle threats from organised crime and terrorism and to promote public confidence at the border.” Met officers will now enhance their presence “airside”– basically anywhere beyond the airport security checkpoints, including outside the terminals – with Border Force colleagues. Among their many duties, they’ll search planes suspected of carrying illegal items and inspect freight that’s trucked in for flight. They’ll target sophisticated gangs of thieves and people working at the airport who commit crime, help criminals, or both. “Our two agencies will share information through access to respective intelligence databases and be directed through a joint It is the Government's desire to police the border differently to how we have in the past have pioneered activity that has fostered closer collaboration with the Border Force and other law enforcement agencies at the border, both at an operational and intelligence sharing level. This new unit is part of that continued drive to For the first time, SO18 officers now work airside on the same teams as Border Force personnel NEW 10-14 Heathrow Cops V2 The Job68.indd 11 20/09/2013 14:32
  12. 12. 12 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE tasking process. This new team will provide a platform for our officers to exchange skills,” says Acting Detective Inspector Sean Channing of the CID. So, what does SO18 do? Based at one of our newest police stations, Polar Park, complete with its own command and control facility and 30-cell custody suite, our Aviation Security Command has a large and constant presence at Heathrow and London City airports. As one might expect, the command runs a massive daily operation to protect the people and property at both airports. Uniformed officers provide reassurance, carry out security The Safer Airport Team builds valuable ties with airport staff Staff check luggage to intercept drugs, stolen goods and other items My officers have the knowledge, understanding and experience of the airport to support the wider Met patrols and handle extraditions and VIP movements through the airport. If a passenger on a flight manifest is flagged up as having an outstanding warrant, then they will be arrested on arrival. There is also a traffic unit whose officers are trained in road collision investigation and traffic law enforcement, but who also assist at the scene of aircraft incidents. They are responsible for policing the roads around the airport and in front of the terminals. There are also specialist Cargo officers who routinely monitor and inspect firearm movements and engage Cargo community business leads. Armed officers provide a key component to protective security operations with patrolling Authorised Firearms Officers and dedicated Armed Response Vehicles. Much like a Safer Neighbourhood team, SO18’s Safer Airport Team is there to win the hearts and minds of an estimated 160,000 people working on the airports’ property every day. It’s not always easy, and as with any large community, there will always be some who don’t want to help the police. But, for the most part, they strike up important relationships with the employees and businesses on the property, which adds to the overall intelligence picture. Information is also obtained through regular contact with aviation enthusiasts, achieved through dialogue during meetings and newsletters. “This important relationship 10-14 Heathrow Cops V2 The Job68.indd 12 19/09/2013 20:08
  13. 13. SO18 13 BASS training SO18 officers receive training in the Behavioural Assessment Screening System, which helps spot a potential criminal in a crowd by scrutinising their actions. WHEELS UP The Met handles any crime that takes place on a plane en route to Heathrow, even if it has just left the ground in Dubai, for example. Freight is trucked to Heathrow from Europe and flown out on passenger planes... ...so SO18 and the Border Force keep a close eye on what's going in and out has unique CID functions, such as stowaway investigations and contractual fraud. “Detecting ‘in-flight’ offences requires a swift and robust approach in order to capture best evidence from transient staff and passengers; I have a great team of committed investigators who have one chance to get a lot of things right,” says Detective Inspector Philip Davies. The list of proactive operations it has been involved in over the past 18 months alone is a long one, showing a sustained effort against crime at the airports that can have a residual effect on London’s neighbourhoods. Crime that affects airports isn’t insular. Phones stolen off borough streets are often packed into cargo crates or luggage and placed on an airplane to be sold abroad. Some of the illegal minicabs being sought by our Safer Transport Team’s Cab Enforcement Unit in the evenings can sometimes be found trying to ply their is a good source of Intel,” says Martin Hendy, Operations Superintendent. What you don’t know SO18 is also very active behind the scenes. Assisting SO15 in counter-terrorism operations is just part of the job. SO18’s CID is tasked with chasing down many of the same criminals as any borough investigator – thieves, criminal gangs, fraudsters, and sexual and violent offenders, to name just a few. The command also Watching all angles SO18 officers and their colleagues at the Border Force also keep an eye on flight crews. Criminal gangs have been known to approach them in their hotels to assist in crimes such as smuggling because they’re not subject to the same checks as passengers. A few members of one crew were recently caught with £80,000 of undeclared cigarettes. Sometimes, people who have been refused immigration clearance into the UK have later turned up as crew. Officers are always on the lookout for such conflicts of interest. Airlines are fined for carrying “deadheaded” crew members – people who are not declared on the manifest because they are perhaps being flown to Heathrow to work on another flight. Like any international airport, crime occurs behind the scenes and designing dynamic and innovative responses is a continuing, and rewarding, challenge for the team. NEW 10-14 Heathrow Cops V2 The Job68.indd 13 20/09/2013 14:32
  14. 14. 14 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE SO18 trade by day near the terminals. Vulnerable people, who we might otherwise never know about, are trafficked out for forced marriages in other countries, or trafficked in to be exploited for various reasons in the capital. The airports are pinch points, important places where – with the right preparation – many of these crimes can be detected. For example, officers can target travelling sex offenders who are travelling outside of the UK to exploit children and other vulnerable people. “Collaborating with SO18 has given us fresh opportunities to target the most dangerous offenders,” says Acting Detective Inspector Simon Giles from the Met’s Paedophile Unit. DCI Ravern Stevens says: “For a variety of crimes, we obtain flight manifests and design ways in which to profile targets using factors such as travel patterns, thus allowing us to stop them as they cross the border. We’ve also carried out a significant amount of work with the Foreign Office, the Border Force, CSU service delivery team and NGOs like Southall Black Sisters. DCI Ravern Stevens, DI Phillip Davies and A/DI Sean Channing designed the new Heathrow Policing Unit Together we have designed and implemented a protocol to identify victims of Forced Marriages and Honour Based Violence. Our work covers intelligence flows, covert and overt tactics at the border. “It has resulted in a number of co-ordinated, risk-based interventions, thus providing an enhanced service to victims. We now seek to share this practice with other border locations. “In cases of Female Genital Mutilation we have again worked with our partners during joint operations targeting flights of high risk”. Success in these areas comes when SO18 receives intel from London’s communities. “My officers have the knowledge, understanding and experience of the airport to support the wider Met,” says DCI Stevens. “I encourage all officers to consider how SO18 could support your local and corporate objectives. Please contact us for advice.” Language skills and a knowledge of different cultures are vitally important. We are often the first and last impression travellers get of British policing What does it take? Chief Superintendent Bert Moore, OCU Commander, tells us what it takes to work for SO18: “Heathrow is a complex place to work because it is so international. Language skills and a knowledge of different cultures are vitally important here. We are often the first and last impression that travellers get of British policing, so we need people who will leave them with a favourable image.” DavidVintiner,Shutterstock NEW 10-14 Heathrow Cops V2 The Job68.indd 14 20/09/2013 14:32
  15. 15. BUREAUCRACY 15 Reducing bureaucracy has long been a focus… UK-WIDE DRIVE The drive to cut bureaucracy from policing is more than a Met initiative, it’s a nationwide government aim. TECH SOLUTION As mentioned in previous editions of The Job, technology will play a big role in reducing bureaucracy, getting us info fast. PAVING THE WAY REDTAPEWe all want less bureaucracy in policing – so what are the aims that will make sure we can do our jobs more efficiently? Sir Ronnie Flanagan famously likened bureaucracy to cholesterol, saying that there are good and bad forms of it. Police need to keep records but, Sir Ronnie said in his report on the subject: “Where the requirement to record becomes more important than the quality of the investigation, the balance is wrong.” Jan Berry, in her subsequent report on bureaucracy, used that same quote. She pointed to complex accountability structures, overbearing performance measures, inconsistent leadership and poor IT as just a few things that get in the way of efficient policing. The national Reducing Bureaucracy Programme Board now exists to help achieve government’s aim of reducing such bureaucracy in the police service. It CUTTING OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE builds on reports by Sir Ronnie, Ms Berry, the HMIC and others. Assistant Commissioner Simon Byrne sits on it for the Met. The national Freeing Up Police Time programme aims to change the way that front-line work is done by ensuring that: Q Front-line officers have consistent implementation of effective practice Q Resources are used effectively in every area, driving out waste and improving daily work for front-line officers Q Officers are helped by a criminal justice system that has improved working across all partners Q Front-line officers capture and access the right information, using the right tools at the right time Q The police response is modern and intuitive, improving confidence and satisfaction. What’s our plan so far? In the Met, there is a strong focus on improving technology, with links to the Met Info Tech and Mobility programmes. There is also work being done on risk assessments across TP and SC&O. A pilot on Camden borough is looking at domestic violence risk assessments as well. Other pieces of more longer-term work will be revealed in due course. Where the requirement to record becomes more important than the quality of the investigation the balance is wrong… 15 Reducing Redtape V2 The Job68.indd 15 19/09/2013 20:13
  16. 16. 16 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE Here are a few key facts and figures.... PHASED ROLLOUT The first 16 boroughs went live with LPM in spring 2013, and the others followed in September the same year. A MAJOR SHIFT More than 2,600 officers are being redeployed to the front line through the new model. LPM GOES LIVE The Local Policing Model (LPM) is now rolled out in all boroughs. Officers were redeployed to beef up the front line and put neighbourhood policing at the heart of the Met’s local efforts. Other teams were restructured to ensure that investigations, call handling and custody all coped with the new way of doing things. Deputy Assistant Commissioner Mark Simmons tells us how it’s gone… So what do you think? It’s gone well, considering the degree of change across the boroughs. It’s been a lot of hard work and a big difference for people who are moving into different roles. We’re pleased, but it doesn’t mean that there haven’t been challenges. What are you pleased by? We listened to people’s preferences about their 16-17 Met Change Update V2 The Job68.indd 16 20/09/2013 16:06
  17. 17. MET CHANGE 17 80 FRESH FACES ON OUR TEAMS Planners knew that the new model would be short 1,000 officers but teams are already receiving their newest recruits. VICTIM SATISFACTION IMPROVES FindouthowTotalVictimCareisworking alongsidethenewmodeltoraiseourresults insatisfaction,page22. per cent of officers got one of their top three choices for redeployment. redeployments and more than 80 per cent of them got one of their top three choices. After launching in the first 16 boroughs, we had an increase in calls – both in emergency calls requiring an immediate response and those requiring a response within an hour. The performances held up in all of them and we hit our targets despite the fact that demand had increased. What have been some of the challenges? Some of our neighbourhood teams struggled to deliver on all their expectations straight away. For instance, summer annual leave impacted staffing levels because people had initially booked holiday under their old team model. And requirements for events like demonstrations put stress on the system, too. The numbers of officers are not yet where we need them to be. We knew when we started that we were about 1,000 officers short, but the recruitment is going well and new officers are arriving on borough even earlier than we had hoped. In the Grip and Pace Centres, where we want an oversight of all our resources on duty at any one time, we’re still working to make processes more resilient. How are supervisor ratios standing up? It’s one of the challenges we have at the moment, particularly around the number of sergeants. Even with the numbers that we planned for, we are short of 220 sergeants in neighbourhood policing. We are working towards solving this issue through the voluntary transfer of sergeants to boroughs from other OCUs and the promotions process for sergeants. Does redeploying to neighbourhood teams cause us to lose out on areas like investigation? The model was based on demand so we could get the best alignment of people possible. In investigations, part of the work was predicated on the new crime assessment policy, which helps manage the workload of detectives on boroughs so they know what crimes they should focus on. We’re not seeing anyone getting an increased workload, they’re all managing very well. With victim care, are we overpromising things to the public? No, because if we’re going to fight crime successfully, victims and witnesses need to feel like we’re supporting them. The better people are treated, the more likely they are to support a prosecution all the way to the end. We’ve certainly set ourselves some challenges around the improvement to services. What have you been hearing from front-line people? The overwhelming message I get from people has been that they recognise that we have to change, and that any change programme will need time to settle down. I’ve been impressed with the way that people have been prepared to give things a go and do the best job they can. 16-17 Met Change Update V2 The Job68.indd 17 20/09/2013 16:08
  18. 18. 18 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE Here are some good stories to come out of the operation... CROYDON Croydon officers managed to arrest the borough’s ‘Most Wanted’ burglar, sought for eight offences. BROTHEL CLOSED IN EALING Ealing officers got the necessary permissions to close down a brothel after residents complained about the property. SAFER PLACES RESULTS The Met’s summer drive to tackle anti-social behaviour gets to the heart of what affects local people the most... A lot changes in a year. Last summer we were up to our ears in large-scale events – the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games and the Diamond Jubilee, to name just a few. “All of those things took up a lot of our attention,” says Commander Mak Chishty. “So this summer we wanted to make sure that the people who live, work and travel in our neighbourhoods don’t have to tolerate anti-social behaviour (ASB).” 18-20 Safer The Job68.indd 18 18/09/2013 07:22
  19. 19. SAFER PLACES 19 19 GOOD RESULTS FOR MERTON Seven per cent of Merton residents are concerned about ASB, down from 21 per cent on last year’s public attitude survey. BURGLARY DOWN IN WANDSWORTH In Nantes Close, Wandsworth officers, working with a local locksmith, have dropped burglaries in the area to zero. Met boroughs now have co-located hubs with local council ASB teams. Safer Places was a coordinated operation involving all 32 boroughs that ran from July to September, but will continue in spirit into the future. It identified the top three ASB issues in each borough and devised promises to tackle each over the summer months. “Officers in each of our boroughs went out and, with the help of their partners, developed a plan that focused on the things that mattered most to local people,” says Commander Chishty. It was an appropriate way to kick off the Local Policing Model (LPM), which launched in two phases over the period and fulfils the Met’s aim to put neighbourhoods at the heart of its policing. “We’re putting more people into neighbourhoods and putting them on at times when our need is greatest,” says Commander Chishty. An inspector is now in charge of each neighbourhood and Safer Neighbourhoods teams can Tackling anti-social behaviour is about meeting people’s needs but it’s also about issues that affect neighbourhoods overall... Spreading the word Commander Mak Chishty told us that publicising local results has been an important part of Safer Places. Every week each borough submitted its top three successes from the operation. “We then push those stories out to the local authorities, who tell their employees and neighbourhoods. It encourages people to report more crime, and is also a form of answerability.” move as directed throughout each area quickly and effectively. Priorities still stand Safer Places didn’t change the usual business of the teams – each ward still has their regular local priorities. The operation just created some specific promises around ASB, be they nuisance, personal or environmental. “Tacklinganti-socialbehaviour is about meeting people’s needs but it’s also about issues that « 18-20 Safer The Job68.indd 19 18/09/2013 07:22
  20. 20. 20 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE SAFER PLACES « affect neighbourhoods overall,” explains Commander Chishty. “People who peddle drugs tend to use drugs or try to establish an open supply market in neighbourhoods. They are the people causing nuisance, problems for local people and upsetting the environment, and they commit petty crime.” One borough that’s had a great impact tackling ASB is Brent, which has seen a 14 per cent reduction in incidents in the past 12 months. They worked out strong responses to their promises, including putting a number of SN teams near the Chichele Road area, where dozens of cash-in-hand workers wait every morning for someone to offer them a job for the day. There were problems in the area, including harassing locals, public drinking and petty crime. In another part of the borough, near the iconic Ace Café – known for attracting motorcyclists – officers did blitz-style operations to tackle nuisance bikers and even got the council to ban bikes on one key road. The owners of the café have worked with the police, knowing that the troublemakers tend to come from outside the borough. Part of Brent’s success, according to Temporary Chief Inspector Sean Lynch, has been its ASB desk in their Grip and Pace Centre that’s staffed by ‘Promise’ is a word that everyone understands from the time they’re young. You’re told that you don’t break your promises... experienced officers and uses Airspace software to record incidents. The calls come in from CCC and the local desk calls the victim to risk assess each and every call. This has resulted in a 99.54 per cent compliance rate for accurately recording ASB incidents. What’s next? Commander Chishty says Met cadets, Safer Schools officers and neighbourhood officers will now be visiting schools and clubs to remind young people to take personal responsibility. Autumn doesn’t mean the end of Safer Places, necessarily – new promises will be made to the public every two months. “‘Promise’ is a word that everyone understands from the time they’re young – you’re told that you don’t break promises,” says Commander Chishty. “We’re saying that we’ll keep our promises.” DavidVintiner 18-20 Safer The Job68.indd 20 18/09/2013 07:22
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  22. 22. 22 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE Here is some of the best practice currently in use... VICTIM CARE CARDS Should be available at front counters and parade rooms, etc. Give them to all victims (except domestic violence cases). REASSURANCE FROM OTHER TEAMS Offer burglary victims follow-up visits from Safer Neighbourhoods teams and do target hardening with Volunteer Cadets. WHAT WORKS Already our efforts around Total Victim Care are bearing fruit, raising satisfaction and leading to better policing overall... WEARE PUTTING VICTIMS FIRST Thanks to the hard work of front-line officers, more Londoners are recognising that the Met cares about victims and is improving its service. Now in its second year, Total Victim Care (TVC) is improving the service the Met provides to victims of crime in London. It is a key pillar of the Commissioner’s Total Policing framework, and is about changing police culture and practice to better help people at a traumatic time in their lives. Listening to officers’ concerns You told the Total Victim Care team what was getting in the way of quality service, and they listened. Many of you just haven’t had the time to provide the best care. The pressure to meet I and S grade call targets can get in the way of spending time with victims. It is a big challenge for the Met, one that we are continuing to work on. But, here’s some good news: Local Policing Model Tranche 1 boroughs improved their response performance by improved allocation of resources to calls. We know there is more to do here which is why we are working with CCC to improve how we allocate calls and how dispatchers communicate with officers on the ground. You need better tools to investigate crime and DoI will roll out tablet devices in 2014. It follows a pilot of mobile CRIS in Waltham Forest. You will be able to input the crime report at the scene instead of returning to the station or staying late to Shutterstock 22-24 Victims V3 The Job68.indd 22 19/09/2013 20:22
  23. 23. TOTAL VICTIM CARE 23 80% SHARE THE RESULTS Be sure that victim survey comments are shared with any relevant officers through supervisors and best practice is shared. SEE IT IN ACTION To read more about some of the top tips for better Victim Care in action see our story about Barnet on page 32. of victims were satisfied with the service they got in April-June 2013. Your stories... Here’s some imaginative work being done on boroughs, where the public is becoming more complimentary about the officers: Q In Newham, Victim Support provides volunteers to assist in the CID office Q Barnet volunteer police cadets visit burglary victims and help prevent repeat victimisation Q Hillingdon, Barnet and Lewisham provide local victim care training for their front-line officers Q Newham calls burglary victims for added reassurance and to correctly identify their needs Q Waltham Forest introduced a crime reporting book specifically for victims of robbery, burglary and violent crime, incorporating information from the victim care card and information regarding local services Q Bexley arranged a leadership day for their inspectors and sergeants during which victim care played a key part Q Wandsworth, Greenwich and Kingston have all recently provided face-to-face team briefings for their front-line officers to refresh messages regarding areas where their officers are challenged Q Twickenham’s PCSOs were trained in crime prevention by a local security company. So what’s next? Where are we going with Victim Care? The Met set out four aims to achieve by 2016 1. Victim care is central to our activity and culture 2.We achieve the highest level of victim satisfaction in UK policing 3.Satisfaction of victims is consistent across London 4.Satisfaction of victims is consistent across communities. do it. Devices in the future will allow you to… Q Generate and issue a CRIS number at the scene Q E-mail an e-victim care pack (e-victim crime card and crime leaflet) Q Record a digital statement Q Record an evidential photograph (if required) You told us that too many crimes were passed to CID or Beat Crimes, which prevented effective investigation and victim care. So MetChange launched the new crime assessment policy alongside LPM to ensure that investigators’ workloads are more manageable. Victims are informed of the likelihood of further enquiries by the initial investigator on the case. So what’s next? This Autumn, training in victim care begins for 19,000 neighbourhood policing officers. Officers will leave understanding just what improves victim satisfaction and how this translates into everyday actions. 22-24 Victims V3 The Job68.indd 23 19/09/2013 20:22
  24. 24. 24 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE Our charity partner helps victims pick up the pieces after a crime and plays an important part in our drive to offer better care VICTIMSUPPORT HELPSYOUGIVEA BETTERSERVICE Victim Support provides vital, practical help to victims and witnesses of crime and has close links to the Met. With a history stretching back nearly 40 years, it is the world’s oldest organisation dedicated to this type of work. The help offered by Victim Support can take many forms, such as giving practical advice to a burglary victim on how to secure their home, or standing alongside an assault victim as they fight for compensation. “Our volunteers are trained to provide expert emotional support to those affected by crimes of all types, including families bereaved by murder or manslaughter,” says Jeff Gardner (pictured below), who retired as a Met Police Officer in 1997 and is now the Director responsible for Victim Support in London. “It is vital, rewarding work and is something we wouldn’t be able to carry out as effectively without strong ties to the Met.” When a crime is reported to police, the victim is referred to Victim Support for an initial assessment of their needs. Once the charity’s victim care officer – who is based at our Victim Care Unit at the Elephant and Castle – has decided what type of help is required by completing a tailored needs can require more dialogue is sexual assault – victims often need a lot of emotional support, as well as encouragement to persuade them to give evidence. Ursula Rabbitte is a volunteer who specialises in helping the victims of serious sexual crime and the families of murder victims. “I recall one woman who had been raped when she was much younger, but the case only came to court ten years later,” she says. “We got her to court through pure collaboration. I attended the police station with her and was present when officers came to talk to her at the house. To me, Victim Support just does what any good police officer would like to be able to do if they had the time.” Jeff Gardner says: “The cooperation of our services and the Met’s helps the public engage more successfully with the criminal justice process.” assessment, they will then pass it on to a volunteer in the appropriate borough. Inevitably, the level of work with police officers varies from case to case, usually according to the type of crime the victim has been party to. One criminal activity that To me, Victim Support just does what any good police officer would like to be able to do if they had more time... Shutterstock 22-24 Victims V3 The Job68.indd 24 19/09/2013 20:22
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  26. 26. 26 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE PERSONALITIES, TEAMS AND CHALLENGES GAELS JUST WANNA HAVE FUNThe Met’s Gaelic football team play at the sport’s spiritual home In its tenth year, the Met’s Gaelic football team – the Hendon Gaels – have made history. The players recently travelled to Dublin to compete at Croke Park – official home to all Gaelic sports – two years after an 80-year ban on members of the British security services playing the sport was lifted. “As a fan of the sport, playing at Croke Park is like playing at Wembley Stadium for fans of English football, or at the Millennium Stadium for Welsh rugby fans,” says Michael Byrne, Hendon Gaels member. In 1920, during the Irish War of Independence, Croke Park was the scene of the Bloody Sunday massacre by the Royal Irish Constabulary, supported by the British Auxiliary Division. Police entered the stadium during a Gaelic football match and shot into the crowd, killing 13 spectators and a team captain. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) then issued Rule 21, which prohibited anyone from the British security services from playing Gaelic football. The rule wasn’t repealed until 2001. Gaelic football is the biggest national sport played in Ireland, and with a good number of Irish and Northern Irish people working for the Met, it didn’t take long for a team to form. The Hendon Gaels started life ten years ago and have gone from strength to strength. The team joined the London GAA and have played in Dublin and Belfast, Garda College in County Tipperary, and even New York. However, this year was the first time they have played in Croke Park, which has a capacity of 82,000 people, as part of the fifth Bi-Annual International Tournament with Ireland’s An Garda Siochana, the Police Service of Northern Ireland, the New York Police Department and the Hendon Gaels. Gaelic football is a fast-paced sport that is a mixture of football and rugby. It’s a 15-a-side game in which players can pass the ball by kicking or palming it. The goalposts are the same as rugby goals, but there's also a crossbar at the same height as it is in football. Players score by either kicking the ball into the other team’s goal – worth three points – or kicking or palming the ball through the upright posts, which is worth one point. So if you fancy the chance to take on a sport that has the best of rugby and football, and offers the chance to play at various venues, then Hendon Gaels are for you. Inset: the Gaels at an earlier competition in New York 26-29 Met People V2 The Job68.indd 26 17/09/2013 08:55
  27. 27. MET PEOPLE 27 An NI officer goes back home... In another ‘first’ for relations across the Irish Sea, Met officers were deployed to parts of Belfast that have not been previously visited by UK forces. In fact, mutual aid deployment to Northern Ireland has already taken place twice this year during two major events in the country’s capital: the G8 summit and the Orange Order parades. One of the officers deployed, a Central London inspector, is a Belfast man who grew up there during the Troubles. He left to join the Met and this was the first time he had been deployed back to his home country to assist the PSNI. First, his team travelled to the Lough Erne Resort in County Fermanagh, where the world's leaders were attending the G8 annual summit. The officer says: “At G8 we were posted on a jetty on the Lough to prevent trespass and to manage public order. When Peter Robinson, the First Minister of Northern Ireland, and his deputy, Martin McGuinness, arrived, I had a conversation with both that I never thought I would have had. Northern Ireland has changed an awful lot. The Troubles stopped many years ago and I said to them that despite everything they had helped to turn things around – the country feels a lot safer now. That would have been difficult for me to say to them a few years ago.” A few weeks later the officers returned to Belfast, this time to help police at the disturbances at the annual Orange Order parades. These marches, held by some members of the Protestant community, have faced opposition from nationalists and conflict has arisen historically. The officer explains: “This was the first time that mutual aid officers had been deployed in such a manner in Belfast. Although hostilities have relaxed, there remains a dissident threat. Our role was to ensure that any confrontations were prevented. It was a challenge, but there was no trouble on our part of the parade and we emerged unscathed. “I’m proud that my colleagues were able to assist the PSNI back home and do so professionally. They said they felt safe and that ‘my wee country was a beautiful one’. It was great to share the experience and learn new public order tactics.” Playing at Croke Park is like playing at Wembley for fans of English football... It’s free to join and everything is provided. “The club offers players a network of people who love the sport. This helps us to build relationships with the Irish community, travelling all across the UK, Ireland and further afield,” says Michael. “Most importantly, it offers great times with great people.” To join, contact Hendon Gaels through the email box on Aware. DID YOU KNOW? Croke Park is the fourth largest stadium in Europe, seating 82,300 people. While it was once a place for only GAA sports, today it hosts a wide variety of international sports and major concerts. 26-29 Met People V2 The Job68.indd 27 17/09/2013 08:55
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  29. 29. MET PEOPLE 29 GettyImages,Shutterstock Met angling team hooks the trophy The Met Police Sea Angling Club is celebrating after its A team won the National Championships. The Met hosted this year’s event, which took place off the coast of Poole in Dorset, and sent three teams, each comprising four anglers. The teams' hauls included bass, wrasse, bream, gurnard, dogfish, rays, conger eel and pouting – all of which were returned to the sea alive. Club Secretary Sergeant Chris Adams was part of the A team that clinched the overall win, along with Simon Norman, Paul Rowland and Vernon Allen (all retired). The other club members who took part were: PC Owen Anthony (SO18) and AIO Tiny Watton (TP Crime), and Dave Whitfield, Dave Keel, Tim Peerless, Martin Poole, Nigel Whitely and Paul Brogan (all retired). If you want to help the Sea Angling Club build on its success, contact Chris.R.Abams@met.police.uk or Conrad. Watton@met.police.uk If any member of the Metropolitan Police Sailing Club fancies a fun-filled day on the river, they can now charter the club’s new RIB. Newly named by Commissioner Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe, the 'Hot Pursuit' RIB – or rigid-hulled inflatable boat – is an XS6.5 model, fitted with a Mercury 150hp FourStroke outboard, which means it goes quite fast… GETTING TO GRIPS WITH HOT PURSUIT: Q At full throttle the RIB can reach a maximum speed of 45 knots. Q The RIB holds six people. Q She is fully equipped with an offshore compass and GPS, plus all the necessary safety equipment, including life jackets and flares. Q The RIB is available for private charter to members who hold a level 2 qualification or higher, together with a short-range radio certificate. Q In mid-season (October and April), the RIB costs £105 per weekday and £115 per weekend day. During the low season (November to March), it’s only £70 per day. In the high season (May to September), prices range from £120 to £130. Q Call the sailing club on 0208 643 4292 to join or book your days. Visit http://mpsc. uk.com for more information. CLUB'S NEW BOAT DELIVERS THRILLS WRASSE BREAM GURNARD RAY DOGFISH POUTING OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE 26-29 Met People V3 The Job68.indd 29 18/09/2013 20:11
  30. 30. The Job WP Guide.indd 1 17/09/2013 14:12
  31. 31. FORUM 31 Illustration:SundeepBhui.Photos:©MetropolitanPoliceHeritageCentre.Shutterstock A question about cost Dear Sir, I noted on the front of the intranet that the Met has been awarded a prestigious procurement award. Procurement to me means getting the best products at the best price. My unit recently needed a new standalone CD/DVD burner for our Panasonic Toughbook. I went through the usual process to get one. The Met's catalogue listed only one, priced at more than £300. Knowing this was ludicrous, I obtained authority, walked next door to PC World and bought two for £70. How does this fit in with great procurement? PC Pete Cottenden, Commercial Vehicle Unit, Catford Traffic Garage OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE CAPTIONS WANTED! It takes more than a smart saddle to be a Met Police horse. Here a Met officer checks the teeth on one, because a ‘whinnying’ smile is everything. Send your captions by 1 November to steven.devries @seven.co.uk Thanks to everyone who submitted; we wish we could run them all! “Black, you say? I thought the official uniform was white?” Claudia Okyere-Fosu, DoI “This is why they just had to change the old ID parade procedures!” Roland Strange “DC Dave Smith couldn’t help but wish he’d paid more attention during his undercover training…” Andrew Rice, MIB WINNER “The man from Del Monte says 'yes!' to the new Local Policing Models” Simon Colenutt, SC&O3 Hi Pete, thank you for your question. Procurement are passionate about delivering value for money for our customers. The CIPS accreditation evidenced that we do this compliantly and in collaboration with our customers by understanding the marketplace and stakeholders' needs. We also have a responsibility to communicate to our customers how our contracts do deliver value. As a rule, when we go to market, our procurements are run to deliver on the following key areas: Q VALUE FOR MONEY Q SERVICE/AVAILABILITY Q MANAGING RISK The price we pay reflects all of these areas; so items could appear expensive if compared with a retail price which, in the technology world (for example), may not cover maintenance or the complex security arrangements we need to meet. In addition, our contracts often stipulate that we need immediate delivery, availability or response times (24/7/365) and these factors impact on the costs. Our contracts are competitively tendered and these awards often allow for benchmarking. Much of what we purchase is often bought in conjunction with other government departments or forces to ensure economies of scale. That said, we are always looking to reduce the amount we spend, by obtaining more for less or by challenging demand or specification. Occasionally, the price on the high street may be more attractive – certainly if our contracts have been let for a number of years – and the cost of technology in the marketplace reduces or you find a special offer. With this in mind, Procurement launched the Value for Money button in March this year, which enables the business to challenge the costs of catalogue items if we appear not to be providing value for money. I note that you have already purchased this item. In future, if you have a similar scenario and the item is like for like, please feel free to challenge us, so we can discuss prices with our existing suppliers or you can purchase elsewhere, in line with our, and the Commissioner’s, commitment to provide competitive purchasing. The Procurement Team 31 Letters V3 The Job68.indd 31 19/09/2013 20:24
  32. 32. 32 OCT/NOV 2013 | THE JOB MAGAZINE WANT TO KNOW Need to knowwant to know YOUR REGULAR GUIDE TO WORKING SMARTER Can’t get no satisfaction? Barnet did. And here’s how… Total Victim Care is one of the three pillars of Total Policing, next to a Total War on Crime and Total Professionalism. The Met started out bottom of the heap among all of the UK’s forces for victim satisfaction. But we’re working to change that, and already the results are improving. One borough that’s done consistently well in victim satisfaction surveys is Barnet (see right). We talked to Borough Commander, Chief Superintendent Adrian Usher, about how they do it. A ten per cent improvement in a year is an impressive jump. Where did you start? One of the first things I did when I started just over a year ago was change our mission statement. It’s simple: “In Barnet we will treat every victim as though they are a member of our own family and leave no stone unturned in our relentless pursuit of offenders as part of our total war on crime.” How do you put that into practice? We broke that statement into four bits and reinforce them in our training. But the Senior Leadership Team (SLT) and I also convey the message constantly to staff. So we tell them at training days, on parades and using internal comms channels. We also had a poster campaign which reminded them that they have a window when dealing with the victim to make a difference. They have to be reassured when you walk away that they feel safe in their homes – you might see 20 victims a day, but each one has to go on living where they’re living. Aren't officers being made into agony aunts? No, the staff want to do this. PCs, PSs, DCs and DSs – they all want to do this. But in a world of austerity and shrinking resources and pressures on performance, we can sometimes lose sight of what’s important, which is delivering a really good service. What else have you done? The last borough commander commendation ceremony was solely for people who had provided outstanding service to victims. We have a forum where good service can be reported quickly to the SLT and we can go and congratulate the officer or staff member. What advice do you have for other officers who want to improve their level of service? Remember that the public do not often think that the follow-up investigation is as good as the initial response. So we’ve taught our officers that their crime report should finish with the words “I have phoned the victim and we have agreed...” Phone the victims and say: "I have done forensics, CCTV, witness appeals, talked to the neighbours – all those things. Is there anything else that you think I can do? Because I think I’ve followed every investigative lead I can." You can get the victim’s agreement once they understand what you’ve done. It’s that final phone call that reassures the victim, and reassurance is the key to this. Victim care is one of the only areas of policing where the officers have complete control of the outcome. By simply asking “how are you?” after filling out the CRIS you can make a world of difference. Do something practical for the victim. Offer to help with their insurance company or finding a locksmith. Tell them they’ll get a visit from a PCSO in case there’s anything else they need. Show the victim that you care. The test should be: if it was your family would you be satisfied with what you just did? If it’s ‘no’, then go back. 82% The peak satisfaction level recorded in Barnet in just over a year through the user satisfaction survey, going up 10% from 72% 32 Want to know V2 The Job68.indd 32 17/09/2013 08:51

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