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Reimagining the Monograph - AAUP 2017 Annual Meeting

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Monographs are increasingly making the print-to-digital shift that journals started twenty years ago, opening up new possibilities for the ways that a long-form argument can be presented and communicated. Yet a richer online environment for scholarly monographs has not come to pass, or at least not at scale. In October 2016, JSTOR Labs, an experimental platform development group at JSTOR, convened a group of scholars, librarians, and publishers to unpack the design issues around the presentation of digital monographs. The group proposed a set of principles for reimagining the presentation of monographs in order to improve the user experience and increase the value of ebooks to scholars. In this presentation, we will introduce these principles, which are outlined in a new white paper available at http://labs.jstor.org/monograph and demonstrate a prototype that the JSTOR Labs group built based on the working group’s feedback: a topic-based navigational aid for monographs called Topicgraph. We will reflect on the implications of these principles for authors, researchers, libraries and publishers. Last, we will contemplate next steps for this work and explore and seek audience input on potential future prototypes and directions. This slide deck includes the results from an activity with the audience, which they voted on potential future prototypes.

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Reimagining the Monograph - AAUP 2017 Annual Meeting

  1. 1. REIMAGINING THE MONOGRAPH AAUP Annual Conference 2017 June 12, 2017 Alex Humphreys, JSTOR Labs @abhumphreys Laura Mandell, Texas A&M @mandellc Charles Watkinson, U Michigan Publishing @charleswatkinso
  2. 2. ITHAKA is a not-for-profit organization that helps the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways. JSTOR is a not-for-profit digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources. Ithaka S+R is a not-for-profit research and consulting service that helps academic, cultural, and publishing communities thrive in the digital environment. Portico is a not-for-profit preservation service for digital publications, including electronic journals, books, and historical collections. Artstor provides 2+ million high-quality images and digital asset management software to enhance scholarship and teaching.
  3. 3. JSTOR Labs works with partner publishers, libraries and labs to create tools for researchers, teachers and students that are immediately useful – and a little bit magical.
  4. 4. labs.jstor.org/monograph REIMAGINING THE MONOGRAPH
  5. 5. HOW WE DID IT
  6. 6. WORKING RAPIDLY Can we improve the experience and value of long-form scholarship? Aug-Sep: User Research Oct: Workshop Nov: Build Prototype Dec: Release Paper/Prototype
  7. 7. TALKING TO USERS
  8. 8. WHAT WE LEARNED: DIVERSITY & ROUTINE They employed a wide diversity of activities and approaches, each honed and “owned” by the participant. They had strong preferences for print or digital depending on use case, but obstructions often forced them outside of their preferred modes. They used a great variety of devices, programs, apps & analog tools that accompanied work with the monograph.
  9. 9. WORKING WITH THE COMMUNITY
  10. 10. ITERATING, ITERATING, ITERATING, ITERATING, ITERA
  11. 11. TOPICGRAPH
  12. 12. labs.jstor.org/topicgraph TOPICGRAPH Understand at a glance the topics covered in a book. Jump straight to pages about topics you’re researching.
  13. 13. A PEEK UNDER THE HOOD • JSTOR Thesaurus is a controlled vocabulary of 40k terms • LDA Topic Model to uncover latent topics • Webapp code available: https://github.com/JSTOR-Labs/topicgraph
  14. 14. SAME ENGINE, DIFFERENT BODY Use your own document to search for articles and books. www.jstor.org/analyze
  15. 15. THE REIMAGINED MONOGRAPH
  16. 16. WHITE PAPER Released today! Describes the project, process & prototype Includes 13 principles to consider when reimagining the monograph labs.jstor.org/monograph
  17. 17. 1. The importance of great writing is a given.
  18. 18. 2. The ideal digital monograph should allow different kinds of readers to navigate it in different ways.
  19. 19. 3. Readers should be given better tools to assess the content of scholarly books quickly and efficiently.
  20. 20. 4. Readers should be able to navigate more quickly to the portion of the book they are interested in.
  21. 21. 5. Readers should be given better capabilities for situating a book within the larger scholarly conversation.
  22. 22. 6. Readers should be able to ‘flip’ between sections of a digital monograph as easily as they can in a print book.
  23. 23. 7. In an ideal world, readers would be able to work simultaneously with both a print and digital edition.
  24. 24. 8. It should be easier to use digital books simultaneously with other scholarly resources, including primary texts, reference works, journal articles, and other books.
  25. 25. 9. Books should be able to ‘travel’ easily from device to device.
  26. 26. 10. Readers should be able to interact with and mark up digital books.
  27. 27. 11. Readers should be able to interact with books in collaborative environments.
  28. 28. 12. Ideally, digital book collections and aggregations would offer serendipitous discovery—the “library stacks” effect.
  29. 29. 13. Digital scholarly book files should be open and flexible.
  30. 30. 1. The importance of great writing is a given. 2. The ideal digital monograph should allow different kinds of readers to navigate it in different ways. 3. Readers should be given better tools to assess the content of scholarly books quickly and efficiently. 4. Readers should be able to navigate more quickly to the portion of the book they are interested in. 5. Readers should be given better capabilities for situating a book within the larger scholarly conversation. 6. Readers should be able to ‘flip’ between sections of a digital monograph as easily as they can in a print book. 7. In an ideal world, readers would be able to work simultaneously with both a print and digital edition. 8. It should be easier to use digital books simultaneously with other scholarly resources, including primary texts, reference works, journal articles, and other books. 9. Books should be able to ‘travel’ easily from device to device. 10. Readers should be able to interact with and mark up digital books. 11. Readers should be able to interact with books in collaborative environments. 12. Ideally, digital book collections and aggregations would offer serendipitous discovery—the “library stacks” effect. 13. Digital scholarly book files should be open and flexible. THIRTEEN PRINCIPLES
  31. 31. 1. The importance of great writing is a given. 2. The ideal digital monograph should allow different kinds of readers to navigate it in different ways. 3. Readers should be given better tools to assess the content of scholarly books quickly and efficiently. 4. Readers should be able to navigate more quickly to the portion of the book they are interested in. 5. Readers should be given better capabilities for situating a book within the larger scholarly conversation. 6. Readers should be able to ‘flip’ between sections of a digital monograph as easily as they can in a print book. 7. In an ideal world, readers would be able to work simultaneously with both a print and digital edition. 8. It should be easier to use digital books simultaneously with other scholarly resources, including primary texts, reference works, journal articles, and other books. 9. Books should be able to ‘travel’ easily from device to device. 10. Readers should be able to interact with and mark up digital books. 11. Readers should be able to interact with books in collaborative environments. 12. Ideally, digital book collections and aggregations would offer serendipitous discovery—the “library stacks” effect. 13. Digital scholarly book files should be open and flexible. THIRTEEN PRINCIPLES
  32. 32. “The reimagined monograph – whatever that ultimately means – will not be built in a single step, or by a single organization.”
  33. 33. WHAT SHOULD THE NEXT STEP BE?
  34. 34. DEMOCRACY IN ACTION! Vote here: PollEv.com/jstorlabs
  35. 35. THE “BOOK AS GATEWAY”
  36. 36. THE “BOOK DASHBOARD”
  37. 37. THE “SCHOLARLY READER”
  38. 38. THE “CITATION MIXER”
  39. 39. Thank you Alex Humphreys @abhumphreys alex.humphreys@ithaka.org http://labs.jstor.org
  40. 40. APPENDIX (OPEN IN CASE OF NO INTERNET CONNECTION)
  41. 41. REIMAGINING THE MONOGRAPH A Digital Humanities Perspective
  42. 42. 54@mandellc
  43. 43. @mandellc 55
  44. 44. @mandellc 56
  45. 45. @mandellc 57
  46. 46. @mandellc 58
  47. 47. @mandellc 61 Hypothes.is
  48. 48. 63
  49. 49. 64@mandellc
  50. 50. @mandellc 65
  51. 51. @mandellc 66 “Nothing can please many, and please long, but just representations of general nature.” Samuel Johnson, Preface to Shakespeare, 1765
  52. 52. @mandellc 67 Any annotation tweeted and retweeted, then “surfaced” by editors, is to be included in the new Monograph as VRE Digital Multigraph

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