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BUILDING YOUR NEXT
GREAT PRODUCT
BY TALKING TO USERS
EACH STEP OF THE WAY
11 October 2016
Alex Humphreys, JSTOR Labs
@abhu...
JSTOR is a not-for-profit
digital library of academic
journals, books, and primary
sources.
Ithaka S+R is a not-for-profit...
JSTOR Labs works with partner publishers, libraries and
labs to create tools for researchers, teachers and students
that a...
THE TROUBLE WITH
H2 & H3 INNOVATION
Horizon 1 Horizons 2 & 3
• Horizon 1 = core business
• Innovation usually seeks
operat...
Q: If H2 and H3 are so uncertain,
how do you find your way to a
sustainable new product or business?
The Design Squiggle, ...
A: Lots of short iterations + lots of
user feedback = speeding up the
learning cycle
Innovation isn’t one big “Eureka,”
it...
HERE’S HOW
JSTOR LABS
DOES IT
1. Create the sandbox
2. Research
3. Design jam
4. Select an approach
5. Refine approach
6. ...
1. CREATE THE
SANDBOX
• Some combination of partner,
target user and new
technology/approach
• This is usually not the sam...
2. RESEARCH • User research & technical
exploration
• Understand users’ context,
language, etc.
• What does success look l...
Ok, honestly? This
persona was from a
different project but it
gives an idea what kind
of info we seek at this
early stage.
3. DESIGN JAM • Informed by user research
• Diverse participants
• Brainstorm as many approaches
as possible
• (8 sketches...
This agenda was from
yet another project, but
shows the kind of
“serious fun” that leads
to a good design jam.
4. SELECT AN
APPROACH
• Create paper, low-fi or hi-fi
prototypes of product concepts
• Test with target users to find
most...
A paper prototype for
Understanding
Shakespeare.
Create enough screens
to test the “big
concept.”
A low-fi prototype for
Understanding
Shakespeare.
Used to test multiple
approaches to the same
idea.
5. REFINE
APPROACH
• Refine approach with ongoing
user testing
• Bring in live data, working
infrastructure
• The prototyp...
6. RELEASE,
MEASURE
• Release prototype
• Measure impact
• Document and share
Case study: Understanding Shakespeare
• End ...
labs.jstor.org/shakespeare
WHAT WE LEARN, WHEN
User Input!
Who are they?
What can we
do that will
help them?
How should we
implement it?
How’d we do?...
THANK YOU
Alex Humphreys
Director, JSTOR Labs
ITHAKA
http://labs.jstor.org
@abhumphreys
alex.humphreys@ithaka.org
Further ...
APPENDIX A
OPEN IN CASE OF
POOR INTERNET CONNECTION
Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way
Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way
Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way
Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way
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Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way

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A description of the stepwise process JSTOR Labs takes developing horizon-2 and horizon-3 opportunities, with emphasis on speeding up iteration cycles and using user-feedback for rapid learning.

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Building Your Next Great Product by Talking to Users Each Step of the Way

  1. 1. BUILDING YOUR NEXT GREAT PRODUCT BY TALKING TO USERS EACH STEP OF THE WAY 11 October 2016 Alex Humphreys, JSTOR Labs @abhumphreys SSP Webinar 2016
  2. 2. JSTOR is a not-for-profit digital library of academic journals, books, and primary sources. Ithaka S+R is a not-for-profit research and consulting service that helps academic, cultural, and publishing communities thrive in the digital environment. Portico is a not-for-profit preservation service for digital publications, including electronic journals, books, and historical collections. ITHAKA is a not-for-profit organization that helps the academic community use digital technologies to preserve the scholarly record and to advance research and teaching in sustainable ways.
  3. 3. JSTOR Labs works with partner publishers, libraries and labs to create tools for researchers, teachers and students that are immediately useful – and a little bit magical.
  4. 4. THE TROUBLE WITH H2 & H3 INNOVATION Horizon 1 Horizons 2 & 3 • Horizon 1 = core business • Innovation usually seeks operational efficiencies • You know the market, the product, etc. • You can make reasonable predictions about both cost to develop and how market will react • Horizons 2 & 3 = new products, new markets & new businesses • “If you build it, they will come.” • You don’t even know what “it” is • Or who “they” are Horizons framework: https://paul4innovating.com/2010/09/10/the-three-horizon-approach-to-innovation/
  5. 5. Q: If H2 and H3 are so uncertain, how do you find your way to a sustainable new product or business? The Design Squiggle, by Damien Newman: http://cargocollective.com/central/The-Design-Squiggle/
  6. 6. A: Lots of short iterations + lots of user feedback = speeding up the learning cycle Innovation isn’t one big “Eureka,” it’s a thousand little ones.
  7. 7. HERE’S HOW JSTOR LABS DOES IT 1. Create the sandbox 2. Research 3. Design jam 4. Select an approach 5. Refine approach 6. Release & measure
  8. 8. 1. CREATE THE SANDBOX • Some combination of partner, target user and new technology/approach • This is usually not the same as the “idea” Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • Partnership with Folger Shakespeare Library • We were interested in finding ways to link their full text plays with the scholarship on JSTOR
  9. 9. 2. RESEARCH • User research & technical exploration • Understand users’ context, language, etc. • What does success look like for them? What stands in their way? • Entire team joins user research • What stands in the way of that success? Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • User research: - Skype interviews w/ 5-7 Shakespeare scholars • Technical exploration: - linking based on citation (FAIL) - fuzzy-text matching of quotations (SUCCESS!)
  10. 10. Ok, honestly? This persona was from a different project but it gives an idea what kind of info we seek at this early stage.
  11. 11. 3. DESIGN JAM • Informed by user research • Diverse participants • Brainstorm as many approaches as possible • (8 sketches in 8 minutes) x 2 • Not constrained by feasibility Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • Design jam held at Folger Shakespeare Library on Day 1 of a week-long “flash build”
  12. 12. This agenda was from yet another project, but shows the kind of “serious fun” that leads to a good design jam.
  13. 13. 4. SELECT AN APPROACH • Create paper, low-fi or hi-fi prototypes of product concepts • Test with target users to find most compelling concepts Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • 3 user-tests conducted on Days 1 & 2 of flash-build
  14. 14. A paper prototype for Understanding Shakespeare. Create enough screens to test the “big concept.”
  15. 15. A low-fi prototype for Understanding Shakespeare. Used to test multiple approaches to the same idea.
  16. 16. 5. REFINE APPROACH • Refine approach with ongoing user testing • Bring in live data, working infrastructure • The prototype is created primarily as a learning tool Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • 2 user-tests conducted each day on Days 3 and 4 of flash-build
  17. 17. 6. RELEASE, MEASURE • Release prototype • Measure impact • Document and share Case study: Understanding Shakespeare • End of flash-build: working, designed prototype with Macbeth • 1 month later: released ”MVP” – 6 plays • 12 months later: released all Shakespeare’s plays; released API • 18 months later: tested approach on a different text (Understanding the U.S. Constitution app) • Currently: exploring expansion to an entire Classics Library
  18. 18. labs.jstor.org/shakespeare
  19. 19. WHAT WE LEARN, WHEN User Input! Who are they? What can we do that will help them? How should we implement it? How’d we do? 1. Create the sandbox 2. Research 3. Design jam 4. Select an approach 5. Refine approach 6. Release & measure
  20. 20. THANK YOU Alex Humphreys Director, JSTOR Labs ITHAKA http://labs.jstor.org @abhumphreys alex.humphreys@ithaka.org Further Reading • The Lean Startup, Eric Ries • Business Model Generation & Value Proposition Design, Osterwalder et al. • Marty Cagan’s Blog: svpg.com/articles • Running Lean & Scaling Lean, Ash Maurya • Sprint, Knapp, Zeratsky, & Kowitz
  21. 21. APPENDIX A OPEN IN CASE OF POOR INTERNET CONNECTION

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