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Photography Final Notes

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Photography Final Notes

  1. 1. Photography Final Notes<br />April 4, 2011<br /><ul><li>Action Photography (Newhall, Ch. 8)
  2. 2. Shift of still photography into motion pictures in the late 19th and early 20th century
  3. 3. Photographers who are interested in movement such as Muybridge and Marey are connected to motion picture/movies
  4. 4. Interest in grand scenes that had a combination of a totality of the whole, carried away to a distant place, but can also look at close up at details
  5. 5. Not only technological but also different ways of seeing, and changes in what people want to see
  6. 6. Eastman
  7. 7. 1854-1932
  8. 8. Kodak camera - 1888
  9. 9. Allowed more people to make pictures
  10. 10. Portable equipment
  11. 11. Where the term “snapshot” originates
  12. 12. Amateur path
  13. 13. Earliest prints are circular format
  14. 14. Church, George Eastman with a Kodak Camera on Board the “S.S. Gallia”, 1890
  15. 15. Riis
  16. 16. 1849-1914
  17. 17. Sociological/social subjects/issues as well as documentation
  18. 18. Police detective/reporter
  19. 19. Began as documentation and publicized these photographs of social conditions
  20. 20. Published How the Other Half Lives
  21. 21. Used powder ignited flash
  22. 22. Bandit’s Roost, New York, 1888
  23. 23. Homeless immigrants crowded in crime-filled ghettos
  24. 24. Home of an Italian Ragpicker, New York, 1888
  25. 25. Photography vs. painting
  26. 26. Painting
  27. 27. can highlight, emphasize and extract things in highly realistic setting
  28. 28. Photographer
  29. 29. Same/similar subjects, takes what is there, more immediate, earthy and less fixed-up, and thus indicative of how things really were
  30. 30. Pictorial Photography (Newhall, Ch. 9)
  31. 31. begins in late 19th century
  32. 32. pictorial vs. documentary
  33. 33. Emerson
  34. 34. 1856-1936
  35. 35. Norfolk, England
  36. 36. Against Art Photography of Robinson and felt it was unnatural to the medium of photography
  37. 37. Liked the “natural” aspects of art
  38. 38. Stay true to the medium
  39. 39. Did not manipulate/retouch negatives
  40. 40. Liked landscapes and the outdoors
  41. 41. Specific titles
  42. 42. Platinotypes
  43. 43. Gathering Water Lilies, 1886
  44. 44. Like Cameron - not concerned about the out-of-focus fuzzy/mellow/warm quality, thought that that reproduced how the eye saw things
  45. 45. Not like Cameron - in that he is not concerned with creating a mythical setting, but rather interested in actual people
  46. 46. Realism movement in French painting influence of artists like Millet who were interested in subjects of everyday workers/commoners
  47. 47. Later claimed photography was not art!
  48. 48. Art Photography becomes more popular in Europe in the 1890s
  49. 49. Demachy
  50. 50. Gum-bichromate process
  51. 51. Creates textures of Degas
  52. 52. Similar subjects, structure, strong silhouetted forms, shadows, still-life of the figure, painterly, pastel strokes
  53. 53. Criticized as un-photographic and too manipulative (different than Robinson)
  54. 54. Behind the Scenes, 1897’
  55. 55. Frederick H. Evans
  56. 56. Architectural photographs
  57. 57. Emphasis on light
  58. 58. Influenced by Impressionism
  59. 59. Little or no manipulation of the negative
  60. 60. Structure, symmetry, supporting elements
  61. 61. Aubrey Beardsley, 1893
  62. 62. Sea of Steps - Wells Cathedral, 1903
  63. 63. Early Stieglitz
  64. 64. 1864-1936
  65. 65. American studied mechanical engineering in Germany
  66. 66. Very similar to Steichen
  67. 67. Important as a photographer, and in terms of his attitudes toward art in general, painting, sculpture, and photography
  68. 68. European modernist ideas into New York
  69. 69. Married to O’keffe
  70. 70. Pictorial, not documentary
  71. 71. Direct, honest and spontaneous
  72. 72. Right moment at the right time quality, brief moments
  73. 73. Still aware of the balance of atmosphere, composition, light and dark values
  74. 74. Popular in Europe
  75. 75. Degas lines that draw attention to the figure
  76. 76. Textures in the clothing
  77. 77. Paula or Sun Rays, 1889
  78. 78. Captures lines through shutters creating a pattern on wall behind woman
  79. 79. Extreme light and dark contrasts yet extreme detail
  80. 80. Vermeer raking light from the left
  81. 81. Director of Society of Amateur Photographers in America
  82. 82. Through the journal and lectures which encouraged amateur photographers
  83. 83. Exhibited high art of Cezanne, Picasso and Matisse as well as photography
  84. 84. Didn’t do a high manipulating of textures (like Steichen)
  85. 85. New York subjects
  86. 86. Winter on Fifth Avenue, New York, 1893
  87. 87. Notice large forms and shapes in the background
  88. 88. Followers
  89. 89. Coburn (1882-1966)
  90. 90. Impressionist subjects
  91. 91. Atmosphere and water reflections, etc..
  92. 92. Kasebier
  93. 93. Blessed Art Thou Among Women, 1900
  94. 94. More of a Romantic quality w/ a hint of narrative
  95. 95. Title - phrase from Annunciation in the Bible
  96. 96. But maybe to reinterpret the biblical story in a modern way
  97. 97. Could be a vague Impressionistic allegory
  98. 98. similar to Cassat
  99. 99. often beautiful repeated shapes and forms
  100. 100. Cameron stagey qualities, and vagueness of subjects
  101. 101. often Impressionistic shadows, dimensionality and flatness
  102. 102. Early Steichen
  103. 103. 1879-1973
  104. 104. From Milwaukee
  105. 105. Early career
  106. 106. Moody landscapes and applied color in dark room
  107. 107. Impressionist paintings of early Mondrian
  108. 108. Studied in Paris in painting and photography
  109. 109. Rodin and “The Thinker”, 1902
  110. 110. 291 Gallery was first Steichen’s studio
  111. 111. Graphic designer
  112. 112. February 1902
  113. 113. Stieglitz develops the Photo Secession
  114. 114. Avant garde, cutting edge as opposed to ordinary
  115. 115. Imitating the Vienna Secession group
  116. 116. Independence from Academic art
  117. 117. Stieglitz, Steichen Kasbier
  118. 118. Goals/Ideals
  119. 119. To advance photography as it applies to pictorial expression
  120. 120. Draw together those practicing or interested in art
  121. 121. To hold exhibitions
  122. 122. Hartmann
  123. 123. Wrote about two camps of Pictorial Photography
  124. 124. 1) painterly (Steichen)
  125. 125. 2) photographic themes and textures (Stieglitz)
  126. 126. 1910
  127. 127. 1st photographic art exhibit in Buffalo
  128. 128. Helps legitimize photography as an art form to a wider audience/public</li></ul>April 11, 2011<br /><ul><li>1910
  129. 129. Cubism, Fauvism, Futurism, birth of Dada and Surrealism, Kandinsky in Germany
  130. 130. Later Stieglitz
  131. 131. Primarily shown in New York
  132. 132. Straight Photography, cropping is okay, but doesn’t manipulate in darkroom like Steichen
  133. 133. Steerage, 1907
  134. 134. Cubist painting influence
  135. 135. Repeated shapes, flat space, forms and surfaces are very surface oriented
  136. 136. City of Ambition, 1910
  137. 137. Dominance of large repeating overlapping shapes and form
  138. 138. Stage-set quality
  139. 139. Georgia O’Keeffe, 1922
  140. 140. Emphasis on shallow surface
  141. 141. Closeup of woodgrain, structure and emphasis on texture
  142. 142. Dramatic shadow around face
  143. 143. Equivalent, 1927
  144. 144. Cloud study
  145. 145. Abstract/non-objective/non-representational
  146. 146. Equivalent of moods and thoughts
  147. 147. Emphasis on finding in nature organic qualities
  148. 148. Often contrasts of nature and architecture
  149. 149. Retains a tension in the depiction of space
  150. 150. Most of the picture is surface oriented w/ little deep space
  151. 151. Emphasis on forms and textures to create space</li></ul>April 18, 2011<br /><ul><li>Straight Photography (Newhall, Ch.10)
  152. 152. Strand
  153. 153. 1890-1976
  154. 154. New York street people portraits
  155. 155. Figure in action
  156. 156. Voyeuristic
  157. 157. Moral issues of photographing blind person who couldn’t object unless you told them
  158. 158. Emphasis on structure
  159. 159. In terms of objects, rural settings and architecture
  160. 160. Formalism
  161. 161. Contructivist
  162. 162. High vantage point with architecture creates interesting space
  163. 163. Cubist collage
  164. 164. Signs, words, text
  165. 165. From Stieglitz and Gallery 291
  166. 166. Porch Shadows, 1917
  167. 167. Abstraction but still Straight Photography because very little manipulation
  168. 168. Capturing in the world the sense of structure
  169. 169. The White Fence, Port Kent, New York, 1916
  170. 170. Ordinary scene but emphasizes form and design
  171. 171. Interesting pattern and modeled, almost Impressionistic lighting
  172. 172. Deep space and sense of distance but simultaneously very Cezanesque flatness due to light and darks push and pull
  173. 173. Rock, Porte Lorne, Nova Scotia, 1919
  174. 174. Ocean-side scenery
  175. 175. Rock terrain
  176. 176. Very close-up
  177. 177. Close-ups of machinery and cityscapes
  178. 178. Similar to Leger machine and city scenes, and the Purism movement which is an outgrowth of Cubism
  179. 179. Literal machinery or forms that resemble machinery
  180. 180. Signs of progress
  181. 181. also O’Keeffe
  182. 182. Town Hall, Vermont, 1946
  183. 183. Sociopolitical issues of America
  184. 184. Sheeler
  185. 185. Constructivist, precisionist
  186. 186. Bucks County Barn, 1916
  187. 187. Patterns and textures in the boards
  188. 188. Precision and organization
  189. 189. Ford Plant, Detroit or Crosswalks, 1927
  190. 190. Seen as positive progress and power of America
  191. 191. Later Steichen
  192. 192. Structured phase in 1910s and 20s
  193. 193. Regularity, repetition</li></ul>April 25, 2011<br /><ul><li>American Straight Photography
  194. 194. Emphasis on shapes
  195. 195. Reflects Modern Cubist painting at this time
  196. 196. Not necessarily a narrative
  197. 197. Outerbridge
  198. 198. Geometry and structure in objects and shadows/silhouettes
  199. 199. Flat cutout forms
  200. 200. Cars/machinery (Sheeler, Leger paintings/Ballet Mechanique)
  201. 201. Steiner
  202. 202. Interest in the shadow of the form as well as the form itself
  203. 203. Vernacular, everyday scenes
  204. 204. America Rural Baroque, 1930
  205. 205. Evoking an era of the past (Baroque)
  206. 206. Curves in chair
  207. 207. Shadows as well as object itself
  208. 208. Siding on house
  209. 209. Interesting shapes and textures
  210. 210. Cubist influence
  211. 211. Plays on/attention to surfaces to create space but still flat
  212. 212. Weston
  213. 213. Abstraction (handling of space, value shifts, variety of forms) as well as Realism (Documentary quality)
  214. 214. Extended from Stieglitz and his circle
  215. 215. Previsualization
  216. 216. Little manipulation, finding the photo in nature
  217. 217. Similar to biomorphic organic forms of Surrealism
  218. 218. Goes out in nature and photograph things in a new context
  219. 219. Clouds, Mexico, 1926
  220. 220. Abstracting forms
  221. 221. Less specific, focus on form and value
  222. 222. Nude, 1925
  223. 223. Interest in figure in an abstracted way
  224. 224. Illusionistic texture, but lack of detail creates a lack of specificity/individuality
  225. 225. Unique lighting
  226. 226. Cropping of figure
  227. 227. Lack of background
  228. 228. Isolation (no Classical costume/drapery)
  229. 229. However, hints of Classical (nude figure, sometimes contraposto, illusionistic idealism, etc.)
  230. 230. Natural forms emphasized
  231. 231. Mimics landscape/natural forms
  232. 232. Artichoke Halved, 1930
  233. 233. Sexual allusion
  234. 234. Emphasizes natural forms
  235. 235. Seeing nature differently (at a close range)
  236. 236. White Dunes, Oceano, California, 1936
  237. 237. Wind-blown sands
  238. 238. Textured details
  239. 239. Repeated forms
  240. 240. Vast space
  241. 241. But crisp details pull space forward
  242. 242. Cunningham
  243. 243. Leaf Pattern, 1929
  244. 244. Closeup
  245. 245. Pattern
  246. 246. Lighting and dark contrasts
  247. 247. Similar to Weston (and Adams)
  248. 248. Straight Photography
  249. 249. Adams
  250. 250. Influenced by Weston and Strand
  251. 251. Close-up Textures
  252. 252. Descendant of Jackson
  253. 253. Natural scenery
  254. 254. Dramatic outdoor scenes with emphasis on textures which help push and pull space
  255. 255. Zones of light and shade
  256. 256. Yosemite National Park,
  257. 257. love of natural scenery
  258. 258. Mount Williamson - Clearing Storm or Sierra Navada, from Manzanar, 1945
  259. 259. Pristine foreground rocks
  260. 260. Raking light in background
  261. 261. Dramatic nature
  262. 262. Texture and precision
  263. 263. Atget
  264. 264. French
  265. 265. Historic buildings for museums
  266. 266. Documents Paris
  267. 267. Casual quality
  268. 268. Took outdoor photographs early in the morning
  269. 269. Storefronts with interesting reflections
  270. 270. Surrealist mix of things, but was not directly influenced by them
  271. 271. Captures an era or way of life that does not exist anymore
  272. 272. Formalism (Newhall, Ch. 11)
  273. 273. Similar to experimental film
  274. 274. Patterns
  275. 275. Unusual technique
  276. 276. Coburn
  277. 277. Vortograph, 1917
  278. 278. Three mirrors create hollow triangle and photographed through this lens
  279. 279. Creates jewel-like forms
  280. 280. Similar to Cubism, facets and kaleidoscopic effects and Experimental Films
  281. 281. Schad
  282. 282. Schadograph, 1918
  283. 283. Laid cutouts and flat objects on light sensitive paper
  284. 284. Similar to Cubist collage
  285. 285. Moholy-Nagy
  286. 286. Straightforward
  287. 287. but irrational Dada found object quality
  288. 288. but rational Cubist shadows that create repeated shapes
  289. 289. From the Radio Tower, Berlin, 1928
  290. 290. Aerial view looking down
  291. 291. Photogram, 1925
  292. 292. Similar to Schadogram and Rayographs
  293. 293. Sensitized paper
  294. 294. Forms, textures
  295. 295. Letters
  296. 296. Unstructured, unplanned Dada found objects
  297. 297. But Cubist structure
  298. 298. Surrealist automatic quality
  299. 299. Heartfield and Hoch
  300. 300. Photographic collage (Cubism) and found objects (Dada)
  301. 301. Rodchenko
  302. 302. Similar to Moholy-Nagy
  303. 303. Formalism
  304. 304. Celebrates technology
  305. 305. Man Ray
  306. 306. 1890-1976, American
  307. 307. Settled in Paris
  308. 308. Rayographs
  309. 309. Similar to Photograms and Schadograms
  310. 310. Expose sensitized paper with objects or other photographs layered and reexposed
  311. 311. Chance results
  312. 312. Similar to Surrealism and Cubism in painting
  313. 313. Traditional structured technical composition but with the idea of chance
  314. 314. Bruguiere
  315. 315. Special processing
  316. 316. Rich surfaces mimic drapery
  317. 317. Instant Vision (Newhall, Ch.12)
  318. 318. Portability of cameras
  319. 319. Latrigue
  320. 320. Small portable camera, snap-shot approach
  321. 321. Interest in movement/moving objects/motion
  322. 322. Grand Prix, 1912
  323. 323. Salomon
  324. 324. Journalistic photographer
  325. 325. Famous people, current events
  326. 326. No flash, existing light
  327. 327. Candid quality
  328. 328. Visit of German Statesmen to Rome, 1931
  329. 329. Kertesz
  330. 330. Instant moment, not interested in clarity of the whole or a classical timelessness
  331. 331. Brandt
  332. 332. Instant moment
  333. 333. Parlor Maids, 1933
  334. 334. Contrast btwn. humble maids w/ glamour/luxury
  335. 335. Repetition of forms
  336. 336. Organic contrasted with geometry
  337. 337. Brassai
  338. 338. Paris nightlife in 1930s
  339. 339. Instant technique from Kertesz
  340. 340. “Bijou”, 1933
  341. 341. Alludes to woman looking for companionship
  342. 342. Genderswitching/questioning
  343. 343. Overdressed with excess
  344. 344. Cartier-Bresson
  345. 345. Seizes the moment/split second
  346. 346. Accidental quality but sophisticated forms and composition
  347. 347. Stieglitz, 1946
  348. 348. Children Playing in Ruins, 1934
  349. 349. During Spanish Civil War
  350. 350. Middle of moment
  351. 351. Social commentary
  352. 352. Boy on crutches
  353. 353. The ruins
  354. 354. Cardinal Pacelli, 1938
  355. 355. Hustle and bustle of a famous person
  356. 356. Emotional quality of the faithful
  357. 357. Weegee
  358. 358. Newspaper photographer
  359. 359. Social commentary on urban life
  360. 360. Crashing-in on event, grabbing public’s attention
  361. 361. Used a flash
  362. 362. The Critic, 1943
  363. 363. Overdressed old women juxtaposed with a woman asking for a handout
  364. 364. Morgan
  365. 365. Photographed dancers
  366. 366. Martha Graham, 1941
  367. 367. In a studio and carefully lit, therefore not documentary
  368. 368. Documentary Photography (Newhall, Ch. 13)
  369. 369. Documents some aspect of the world
  370. 370. Mostly American
  371. 371. Sander
  372. 372. German
  373. 373. Atlas of German “types”, professions and trades
  374. 374. Full figure in their home or work setting
  375. 375. Rural, urban, rich and poor
  376. 376. Hine
  377. 377. Ellis Island immigrant photos
  378. 378. Workers/working class
  379. 379. Trained as a sociologist, and the camera for him was a tool for research and communication
  380. 380. ‘Photo-stories’ w/out text
  381. 381. Similar to Riis
  382. 382. Carolina Cotton Mill, 1908
  383. 383. Helped educate the population about child labor situations which helped establish child labor laws
  384. 384. Johnston
  385. 385. Photos of the south black agricultural tradesworkers and black education
  386. 386. Evans
  387. 387. Depression era photographer
  388. 388. 1930s (think 42nd St. references)
  389. 389. Hired by US government to document the Depression conditions in the South
  390. 390. Gas Station,1936
  391. 391. Strong structure
  392. 392. Instant moment/vision
  393. 393. Very little manipulation
  394. 394. Very careful to capture the scene of the place and what life was like
  395. 395. Allie Mae Burroughs, 1936
  396. 396. Washroom of the Burroughs’ Home, 1936
  397. 397. Plain and ordinary
  398. 398. Pleasing compositional and design elements
  399. 399. Lange
  400. 400. Portrait photographer and later documentary of migratory workers
  401. 401. Time and place important
  402. 402. Migrant Mother, 1936
  403. 403. Captures the emotion of hardship
  404. 404. Classic mother and child, almost religious
  405. 405. Shahn
  406. 406. 35mm w/ right angle viewfinder so he could photograph them without their knowledge
  407. 407. Rehabilitation Client, 1935

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