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Putting KM Principles into Practice: Canadian Forest Fire situation Report

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Describes how KM principles were used to design, develop, and implement a weekly national forest-fire situation report.

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Putting KM Principles into Practice: Canadian Forest Fire situation Report

  1. 1. Putting KM Principles into Practice: Canadian Forest Fire Situation Report Dr. Albert J. Simard Caroline A. Cook
  2. 2. <ul><ul><ul><li>“ A new information revolution is well under way... It is not a revolution in technology, machinery, techniques, software, or speed. It is a revolution in CONCEPTS.” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Peter Drucker , Management Challenges for the 21 st Century (1999) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Principles <ul><li>Use knowledge to transform data from multiple sources into synthesized information </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on ease of understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Technology is supporting, not driving </li></ul><ul><li>Use existing systems and infrastructure </li></ul><ul><li>Tacit knowledge is essential </li></ul><ul><li>Lead by example </li></ul>
  4. 4. The Situation <ul><li>Information collected by 17 jurisdictions </li></ul><ul><li>Daily reports highly detailed & technical </li></ul>
  5. 5. Information source: 3 years ago
  6. 6. The Situation <ul><li>Information collected by 17 jurisdictions </li></ul><ul><li>Daily reports highly detailed & technical </li></ul><ul><li>Delays between activity and reports </li></ul><ul><li>Information in tabular and text formats only </li></ul><ul><li>Information was disjointed, no synopsis </li></ul><ul><li>Limited usefulness for non-professionals </li></ul>
  7. 7. The Context <ul><li>Provinces & others manage forest fires </li></ul><ul><li>Canadian Forest Service reports to Minister </li></ul><ul><li>CFS is not an operational organization </li></ul><ul><li>Inconsistent inputs precluded automation </li></ul><ul><li>Report must be in plain language </li></ul><ul><li>All documents must bilingual </li></ul><ul><li>Report must be timely </li></ul><ul><li>No budget </li></ul>
  8. 8. Design Criteria <ul><li>Use graphics for rapid understanding </li></ul>
  9. 9. The design Number of Fires Seasonal Area Burned Interagency Resource Mobilization Area of Smoke by Satellite May June July Aug. Sept.
  10. 10. Design Criteria <ul><li>Use graphics for rapid understanding </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum one page of text to summarize the national situation </li></ul><ul><li>Bilingual report published on the Web within 24 hours of receipt of inputs </li></ul><ul><li>Link information from multiple sources to go beyond the facts </li></ul><ul><li>Predict fire activity for coming week </li></ul>
  11. 11. The Approach Tables and graphs Weekly summary Prognosis Statistics Fire Information System Maps Satellite images Weather forecasts Information sources Resources The Product Translation
  12. 12. Then what? <ul><li>Additions beyond the report is where you find more value added </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>archived reports </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>links to provincial agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>links to other fire sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>link to an expert </li></ul></ul>
  13. 13. The report
  14. 14. Value-added
  15. 15. Other agencies
  16. 16. Other fire sites
  17. 17. Tacit knowledge An expert
  18. 18. Then what? <ul><li>Additions beyond the report is where you find more value added </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>archived reports </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>links to provincial agencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>links to other fire sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>link to an expert </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Incorporate feedback and questions received to modify the report to better meet needs </li></ul><ul><li>Report 3 years ago is different than the one today </li></ul>
  19. 19. Evaluation <ul><li>Visits and users </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1998: 12,000 2001: 23,500 (to date) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest single access page for CFS-HQ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Media, tourists, students, companies, military </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Feedback </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1) Update military base commanders 2) Anticipate helicopter deployment 3) Plan vacation 4) Prepare university project (5) Write newspaper article </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Efficiency </li></ul><ul><ul><li>THEN: 48-hour turnaround (8-10 hrs work; 5 people; 10+ steps) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>NOW : 24-hour turnaround (5-6 hrs work; 3 people; < 10 steps) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Influence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>From clients on the report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On information sources from the report </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>On other information providers from the report </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Influence from clients This addition in 2001 has reduced the number of requests by 50%
  21. 21. Influence on information sources
  22. 22. Influence on information sources
  23. 23. Influence on other sources
  24. 24. Lessons learned <ul><li>Tools are tools – how you use them determines the success of a knowledge project </li></ul><ul><li>People are central in knowledge organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Capturing tacit knowledge is a challenge; adapting tools and processes is a solution. </li></ul><ul><li>Leading by example does work. </li></ul><ul><li>You can influence culture one project at a time. </li></ul>

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