Providing and Using Disaster Information:  A Service Partnership Albert Simard International Disaster Reduction Conference...
Provider / User   Information Market Demand (Users) Providers and users connect through an Information Market Supply (Prov...
Content Value Chain “ Flow of content through sequential stages, each of which changes its form and increases its usefulne...
Products and Services Direction Plans Operations Positions Coordination Accomplishments Answers Advice Teaching Facilitati...
Management Infrastructure <ul><li>Collections mgt.  </li></ul><ul><li>Data management  </li></ul><ul><li>Information mgt. ...
Organizational Focus   Mitigation Executive Operational Preparation Recovery Planning C Response
Service Focus 1.  2.  3.  4.  5.  6.  7.  8.  9. Use Internally Use Professionally Use Personally Generate Transform Add V...
Service Stages <ul><li>Generate   (start Knowledge Services value chain) </li></ul><ul><li>Transform   (goods & services i...
Information & Knowledge Market  (Performance / Supply) (Market / Demand) 6. Add Value 7. Use Professionally 8. Use Persona...
Service System -Structure Elements of Zachman (1992) Component… Component f Component c Component… Component e Component b...
Service System -Stages * = essential Organization Society / Nature Interme-diaries Add Value Enhanced Outputs Developers T...
Audience Characteristics <ul><li>Who are the people you want to reach? </li></ul><ul><li>What motivates them to take actio...
Service Richness Spectrum  Rich Reach Provide Advertise Explain Promote Support Intervene Interaction Everyone Stakeholder...
Conclusions <ul><li>Transferring content from its source to the end user involves a lot more than simply making it availab...
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Providing and sharing disaster information

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Describes a service framework for sharing disaster information (World Conference on Disaster Reduction, Davos Switzwerland, 2006)

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  • Today, I’d like to talk about how disaster information flows from its point of origin to its final destination. As you’ll see, partnerships are the key to making the whole system work.
  • Providing and sharing disaster information

    1. 1. Providing and Using Disaster Information: A Service Partnership Albert Simard International Disaster Reduction Conference Davos, Switzerland - Aug. 27-31, 2006
    2. 2. Provider / User Information Market Demand (Users) Providers and users connect through an Information Market Supply (Providers)
    3. 3. Content Value Chain “ Flow of content through sequential stages, each of which changes its form and increases its usefulness and value.” (NRCan, 2006) “ Embedded value in the form of the message or signal contained within all elements of the content value chain.” Objects Data Information Knowledge Wisdom
    4. 4. Products and Services Direction Plans Operations Positions Coordination Accomplishments Answers Advice Teaching Facilitation Support Laboratory Database Scientific article Technical report Outreach material Geospatial products Statistical products Standards Policies Regulations Systems Devices Objects Data Information Knowledge Wisdom Solutions Services Products Content
    5. 5. Management Infrastructure <ul><li>Collections mgt. </li></ul><ul><li>Data management </li></ul><ul><li>Information mgt. </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge mgt. </li></ul>Processes <ul><ul><li>- Staffing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Motivation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>- Learning </li></ul></ul>People <ul><li>Mandate </li></ul><ul><li>Responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Authorities </li></ul><ul><li>Resources </li></ul>Organization Content, Services Technology <ul><li>Computers </li></ul><ul><li>Applications </li></ul><ul><li>Systems </li></ul><ul><li>Communication </li></ul><ul><li>-Networks </li></ul>
    6. 6. Organizational Focus Mitigation Executive Operational Preparation Recovery Planning C Response
    7. 7. Service Focus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Use Internally Use Professionally Use Personally Generate Transform Add Value Transfer Evaluate Manage Extract Advance Embed Legend S Organization Sector / Society
    8. 8. Service Stages <ul><li>Generate (start Knowledge Services value chain) </li></ul><ul><li>Transform (goods & services increase utility, value) </li></ul><ul><li>Manage (permit transfer) </li></ul><ul><li>Use Internally (accomplish organizational objectives) </li></ul><ul><li>Transfer (enable external use) </li></ul><ul><li>Enhance (increase availability, utility, value) </li></ul><ul><li>Use Professionally (sector derives benefits) </li></ul><ul><li>Use Personally (individuals derive benefits) </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluate (organizational mandate, resources) </li></ul>
    9. 9. Information & Knowledge Market (Performance / Supply) (Market / Demand) 6. Add Value 7. Use Professionally 8. Use Personally Evaluate Natural Resources Forestry Metals & Minerals Earth Sciences Energy 1. Generate 2. Transform 3. Enable 4. Use Internally 5. Transfer Organization
    10. 10. Service System -Structure Elements of Zachman (1992) Component… Component f Component c Component… Component e Component b Purpose… Purpose 2 Purpose 1 Component… Component d Component a Stage 1 Stage 2 Stage … Knowledge Services Value Chain Benefits Who Work What Why
    11. 11. Service System -Stages * = essential Organization Society / Nature Interme-diaries Add Value Enhanced Outputs Developers Transform Products / Services Users Use Internally Solutions Evaluators Evaluate Performance/ Markets Recommend Clients Use Profession-ally Outcomes / Societal B. Canadians Use Personally Personal Benefits Originators Generate Content * Providers Transact / Transfer Outputs Knowledge * Other Services Lost Managers Preserve / Enable Existing / Available Inventory *
    12. 12. Audience Characteristics <ul><li>Who are the people you want to reach? </li></ul><ul><li>What motivates them to take action? </li></ul><ul><li>Are they permanent or transient? </li></ul><ul><li>Are they partners? Clients? Stakeholders? </li></ul><ul><li>What is their level of professional knowledge? </li></ul>
    13. 13. Service Richness Spectrum Rich Reach Provide Advertise Explain Promote Support Intervene Interaction Everyone Stakeholders Practitioner Intermediary Knowledge Other service System Destination All Many Some Few Few One Audience Size Immediate Self-help Consultation Specification Paper Conversation Transfer Fool-proof Popular Professional Complicated Conceptual Complex Content Difficulty
    14. 14. Conclusions <ul><li>Transferring content from its source to the end user involves a lot more than simply making it available. </li></ul><ul><li>A service approach helps to understand what actually happens between the source and final use. </li></ul><ul><li>Partnerships among providers, intermediaries, and clients are essential to making the whole system work. </li></ul>

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