Social Networking & Advocacy              Kristin SavardWhite Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood
Overview•   Social Networking•   Social Networking in Nigeria•   Social Networking for Advocacy (Nigeria & Beyond)•   Fami...
Film by Erik Qualman
Social Networking   in NIGERIA
Facebook Users in Nigeria                    4,076,160
January 2011
Age of Nigerian Facebook Users
Gender of Nigerian Facebook Users
• 60% of Twitter users are  21-29 yrs old• 70% use Twitter as a  source for news• Nigeria has 3rd highest  volume of Tweet...
• Nigerians     music, stories, entertainment• Youtube.com.ng launched Dec 2011• YouTube Partner Program to help develop  ...
Raise               AwarenessInfluence                   Reach new Policies                   Audiences               Soci...
Raise Awareness, Reach New Audiences
Collaborate & Inspire Action
Engage Decision Makers, Influence Policies
16,000+ comments!
Enough is Enoughand Demand Nigeria
Final Thoughts• Requires commitment- time & consistency• Make a plan & remember social networking is  a tool and not a sol...
WHAT CAN YOU DO?
Follow/Friend/Fan WRAwww.facebook.com/whiteribbonalliancewww.facebook.com/WRANigeriawww.youtube.com/whiteribbonalliancewww...
Thank You!              Kristin SavardWhite Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood    ksavard@whiteribbonalliance.org
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health
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Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

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How to use social media for maternal, newborn and child health advocacy

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  • We will begin with Facebook because it is the most popular. So, as of October 2011, there were over 4million Nigerians using FB. See red arrowIn one month, just about 190,000 new users join Facebook in Nigeria (4.89% increase)This equates to about 1m new users every 6 monthsNow it’s important to recognize that Facebook has reached less than 3% of the Nigerian population, BUT this number is expected to grow as internet access and mobile phone access continues to grow. In 1999, only 100,000 Nigerians had access to the internet, 10 years later 43.9 million people now have access.As more people get mobile phones, the number of Facebook users is expected to grow – in Nigeria, over 31% of internet content is accessed from mobiles.
  • In January 2011, Facebook toppled Yahoo! to become the most visited site in Nigeria- so it is gaining traction.
  • Let’s look at who is using Facebook in Nigeria.More than 1 in 3 Facebook users are between the ages of 18-24. (green)And another 1 in every 3 users are 25-34 years old. (orange)Important for Family Planning advocacy because: 82% are in reproductive age range (yellow, orange, green)
  • It’s also important to look at the gender divide on Facebook because there is a significant difference in the number of males and females on Facebook. 82% of Nigerian Facebook users are men, that’s 8 out of every 10 users.
  • How many people use Twitter? How many people are familiar with Twitter? It can be a little intimidating but once you get the hang of it, it’s really not bad, right Tonte?
  • I just want to give you a quick example of how Twitter can be helpful. Now, I’ve been using twitter for a few years and the greater use that I have found for Twitter is to keep up on news (as soon as it happens) and to reach new audiences. There’s a funny saying now that says “news doesn’t break, it tweets.” We used to have breaking news, as soon as something major would happen all of the TV channels and radio stations would cut to an important message with breaking news. But now… people are getting their news from Twitter instead of waiting for the time it takes a TV Channel or Radio Station to provide coverage. So if something is happening very quickly and you don’t want to wait for the media to get to the event, write the story, send it back for editing and publishing. You can search twitter.I’ve put here one example of this. In February Tonte and WRAN members were mobilizing in various states and meeting with parliamentarians to encourage them to support maternal health. Now, Tonte is a very busy man who doesn’t always have time to email or call to share all of the amazing work that WRA Nigeria is doing. So, sometimes I have to get my news from Twitter. On Feb 1st, I knew that Tonte was visiting Bauchi state, saw the comments that the Speaker made about WRA and was able to share this information with all of WRA’s global followers to show them the successes of working with parliamentarians.
  • So I’m not sure how many people know but youtube just launched YouTube Nigeria in Dec. The idea behind youtubenigeria is that nigerians are likely to use youtubebecaue they love music, stories and entertainment. PPFeatherI’d expect to start seeing an increase in the number of people posting videos to youtube. Later in this presentation I’ll show how Youtube has been used for advocacy.
  • So, something that I want to stress is that social networking is not a solution in itself. Social networking is a tool and another form of communication, a new way to reach people. Social media (like all technology) is changing the way that society functions – most noticeably, the way people get information, communicate with each other and influence each other. One of the great things about social media is that it is a great “equalizer” because it provides a platform to reach millions and millions of those who might not otherwise have the means to communicate on a large scale. BUT we need to realize the limitations, because it does not reach everyone. So, I want everyone to be conscious of what social media can and can not do. In these next few slides, I will share some of the ways that social networking can be used to LEVERAGE advocacy. But, keep in mind that social media is most effective when it is one part of a much bigger strategy- when you know what advocacy goal you want to achieve and what it will take to get there, social media can be one tool to help leverage these efforts.
  • Social Networks provide an incredible opportunity to reach new audience and to raise awareness about the issues you care about. But it’s not just about what you say… it’s about whether or not you can get others to pass your message on. That’s where the real value of social media is. People trust their friends and their networks, so if you can convince one person and that person is moved to share your message with others, then your message gains more power – reaches new people and has more validity behind it. Does that make sense?Build partnerships with media, bloggers, etcReach beyond local outlets- international mediaUse celebrities to help spread the word
  • In the US and the UK there are what we call mommy bloggers. Moms that like to write blogs and there are groups with tens of thousands of members. A few years ago we worked with the 1st lady in the UK, Naomi Cambell, A few models and Mommy blogger groups to help raise awareness about WRA and maternal health. Usually, if you use celebrities and use them well, then the media is interested and they will write about what the celebrity is doing and this should help spread the word even further. One of the interesting things about social networking and twitter in particular is that you can reach out to celebrities and people that you normally wouldn’t have access to. They may not always agree to support you or even respond to you, but it often doesn’t hurt to ask.
  • Not just used for pushing info out, also about moving people to actionGood tool for mobilization- reaching people that haven’t worked with you before to invite them to mobilizations eventsAlso a good way to keep your every day members engaged. Partners seem to collaborate even better online than in real life. Promote messages from partners & their efforts.Action of the Month- So to keep WRA members engaged, WRA promotes Action of the Month- with a new theme and new action that members any where in the world can take each month. This month is focused on engaging politicians and local leaders.
  • But SN is not just useful for engaging your own members but also for collaborating with partners on unified actions and campaigns. Actually I have found that partner organizations work better together online then they do in real life!So this past year, WRA, Save the Children worked with 300+ organizations on a campaign for more health workers, better supported in the lead up to the UN General Assembly. We all agreed on messages and facts that we would use, we all contributed information and materials from our own organization. On twitter, we reached almost 5 million users in one week. WRA’s unique role during the UNGA was to bring the voices from the grassroots to the global level. We were also supported by celebrities and influentials who have large followings to help us spread the messages. During the week of the UNGA, we had 3x the usual number of visitors to our website and we had nearly quadrupoled the number of people visting the WRA Facebook page.
  • Around the world, but in Africa in particular, social media is not being used just to talk to friends and make new connections. In Africa, social media has actually played a significant role in pushing for change.Social Networking is believed to have played a role in the Arab Spring revolts, National Elections, and Somalia.It is my opinion that social networking can be used to influence policy because leaders are more accessible and because social networking provides a very public platform to demand accountability.
  • So let’s start with the FACEBOOK PRESIDENT himself. I put a quote here that I found in a media article that says: In a country long ruled by inaccessible Big Men, it was a startling revelation to realise we could ‘interact’ with the President on Facebook. In fact, Goodluck Jonathan is talked about as the most accessible president and the one who has made the best use of Facebook. And he doesn’t just push information out, he actually responds to comments. For example: “I spent time reading your comments and yesterday a youth named ToyinDawodu indicated that he had an idea for a project that could deliver 4,000 MWs of electricity. I believe in the creativity and the spirit of innovation resident in our youth and I want to give ToyinDawodu a chance to be heard. Toyin, someone from my office will make contact with you regarding your idea. I know I can not attend to every comment or suggestion due to time constraints, but please do know that I read them and they influence my actions. GEJI also read that he recently reversed a ruling to ban the Nigerian football team from international play due to their poor performance at the World Cup, and cited several Facebook comments as key to his decision.Some of his posts get more than 16,000 comments! That is an incredible amount. Barack Obama usually gets between 2-3000 comments on his posts.
  • Goodluck Jonathan isn’t only politician on social networking sites Just like his opponents, the presidential candidate for the Congress for Progressive Change (CPC) MuhammaduBuhari also utilised social media. He used a website linked with YouTube videos containing campaign outings and programs. There are 13,811 followers on the Buhari4Change Facebook page.
  • 168,761 facebook fans
  • After declaring his intention to run for presidency in 2011, NuhuRibadu (Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN)) went to social media to get support from young NigeriansSo you can see that Facebook and social networking is starting to play a role in elections and that’s not true only in Nigeria. It’s happening in a lot of countries
  • And it’s not just National policymakers, Lagos State Governor BabatundeFashola is on Facebook and during his campaign he greeted his constituents good morning and good evening on daily basis.
  • And then here another Governor, Governor Ahmed from Kwara state and I posted this one to demonstrate how social media can be an opportunity to capture commitments. Here you see his commitment on twitter to create blood banks in 21 PHCs to reduce maternal and infant deaths caused by anaemia. Now it takes following up with Governor Ahmed but you can see the public commitment that he made and use that to hold him accountable.
  • One example that I want to share with you from beyond Nigeria is a video from the UK. In the lead up to the election in the UK in 2010, Oxfam, Amnesty, Save the Children, and Mommy blogger group- visited all three candidates to request that they sign on a Mom’s Manifesto, expressing their commitment to support global maternal health efforts. WRA then uploaded these videos on Youtube and all of our social networking sites and now that Prime Minister Cameron is in office, we can use this video in various campaigning strategies to make sure that maternal health continues to be a priority for the UK’s Dept For International Development.AND, it is important to highlight that this activity was actually modeled after what some of our N.A.s have been doing in country to get statements from campaigning officials in the lead up to elections. Only this time we utilized social networking to help reach the audiences that will continue to put pressure on these political leaders to stay true to their words. This example really highlights how social networking sites can be utilized to leverage what is already happening.
  • Finally, I want to highlight two groups that I have learned about in Nigeria. I am sure there are plenty more, but these are two that I recently came across and thought they would be worth mentioning. Demand NigeriaEnough is Enough Nigeria Coalition is a coalition of individuals and youth-led organisations interested in good governance and public accountability. They aim to stay out of party politics, but were pretty active during the recent protests about the fuel subsidy. They’ve got their own YouTube channel and Flickr album.
  • So, I hope this powerpoint has helped to show you the potential of social networking sites. I think it is clear that SN is going to continue to grow and have greater impact in Nigeria and in the world. Now I want to turn it over to Bridget who will talk more about the results of the SN survey and more specifically about Family Planning and Social Networking and then we can all meet together to discuss next steps and what we would like to do together.
  • Follow us, friend us, fan us… just by joining WRA on these sites, you’ll learn more about what WRA members are doing, what new and relevant maternal health materials are available and how you can get involved in organized actions and campaigns.I’m going to run through our sites quickly to show a few quick ways to get involved on each site, but I really do suggest that you friend or follow us so that you can learn about the specific campaigns from WRA and our member organizations.
  • Personal pages, organizational pages, groups and causesPost links: to your wall and to the wall of your fans/causes“Share”- When someone else posts a link you think is useful, pass it on!Event Invitations- Use these to invite others to your advocacy events or fundraisersLink with Twitter- automatically share status updates and links with your Twitter and other social networks.
  • 140 characters at a time to express a thought, ask a question or share newsSearch for friends and topics to connect and find newsUse #hashtags to join a conversation or promote an eventRetweet interesting links from others
  • Video SharingSubscribe to our channelProvide feedback on videosShare videos on other social networking sites
  • Social networking 4 advocacy-Maternal, Newborn and Child Health

    1. 1. Social Networking & Advocacy Kristin SavardWhite Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood
    2. 2. Overview• Social Networking• Social Networking in Nigeria• Social Networking for Advocacy (Nigeria & Beyond)• Family Planning Survey Results• Working Together – Next Steps
    3. 3. Film by Erik Qualman
    4. 4. Social Networking in NIGERIA
    5. 5. Facebook Users in Nigeria 4,076,160
    6. 6. January 2011
    7. 7. Age of Nigerian Facebook Users
    8. 8. Gender of Nigerian Facebook Users
    9. 9. • 60% of Twitter users are 21-29 yrs old• 70% use Twitter as a source for news• Nigeria has 3rd highest volume of Tweets in Africa• Most of Nigeria’s newspapers & bloggers have twitter.
    10. 10. • Nigerians music, stories, entertainment• Youtube.com.ng launched Dec 2011• YouTube Partner Program to help develop your channel and build an audience• YouTube Feather for slow connections makes videos more accessible
    11. 11. Raise AwarenessInfluence Reach new Policies Audiences Social Networking &Engage Advocacy CollaborateDecision with PartnersMakers Inspire Action
    12. 12. Raise Awareness, Reach New Audiences
    13. 13. Collaborate & Inspire Action
    14. 14. Engage Decision Makers, Influence Policies
    15. 15. 16,000+ comments!
    16. 16. Enough is Enoughand Demand Nigeria
    17. 17. Final Thoughts• Requires commitment- time & consistency• Make a plan & remember social networking is a tool and not a solution in itself• Work together
    18. 18. WHAT CAN YOU DO?
    19. 19. Follow/Friend/Fan WRAwww.facebook.com/whiteribbonalliancewww.facebook.com/WRANigeriawww.youtube.com/whiteribbonalliancewww.twitter.com/wraglobalwww.twitter.com/WRANigeria
    20. 20. Thank You! Kristin SavardWhite Ribbon Alliance for Safe Motherhood ksavard@whiteribbonalliance.org

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