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agile Marina Pochinok_1_ENG-2

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agile Marina Pochinok_1_ENG-2

  1. 1. HR + Agile = ?
  2. 2. M. Pochinok, 2016 Totally new employee experience thanks to agile HR services Assistance in getting Agile by transforming organizational structure, culture, management model, and HR processes HR + Agile = 2
  3. 3. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 3
  4. 4. M. Pochinok, 2016 What is Agile? 4
  5. 5. M. Pochinok, 2016 No top-down control Everyone really cares of what they do A team can initiate leader change The amount of salary is determined by colleagues Multiple small teams No personal goals The amount of salary has nothing to do with the number of subordinates No boss Free communications flow
  6. 6. M. Pochinok, 2016 Agile Leading transformation approach
  7. 7. M. Pochinok, 2016 What is Agile organization? Results Agile organization can quickly adapt to ever-changing conditions in a cost-effective way thanks to • Fast implementation • Continuous innovation • Fast hit-and-miss learning Inside Every employee does right things in a right way thanks to • Shared objective • Self-organization and independence • Collaboration
  8. 8. M. Pochinok, 2016 HR roles and tasks Control Speed Start-up Stagnation Agile Bureaucratic Chaos What is Agile organization?
  9. 9. M. Pochinok, 2016 Agile: Myths and Reality ▪ Universal solution to solve all problems ▪ No documentation and planning ▪ No discipline ▪ Multiple reworking cycles ▪ Disregarding architecture and contradicting its requirements ▪ No testing ▪ Fast and disciplined implementation ▪ Better return on investment thanks to frequent releases ▪ Iteration product development in small parts from the very beginning ▪ Minimized risks due to fast feedback from end users ▪ Business/IT alignment Agile: Myths… … and Reality
  10. 10. M. Pochinok, 2016 Agile proved to be more efficient, transparent, high-quality, and cost- effective than traditional approaches Source: Tenth State of Agile Report 2016 by VersionOne; 1,321 projects in Numetrics software database; examples of customers -70% Comparison of Scrum teams and teams using traditional software development methods in terms of efficiency Performance Number of defects per standard requirement Date slippage Development cost +27% More efficient distributed group management 80 Faster implementation 79 Better software quality 78 Lower project risks 77 Better coordination between business and IT 73 More disciplined design 70 Improved software maintainability 62 Better predictability 81 Better team morale and motivation 81 More transparent projects 84 Improved performance 85 Change management ability 87 Benefits achieved, % of respondents who noticed benefits -30% -40%
  11. 11. M. Pochinok, 2016 Companies have been using Agile for a long time 2000s 2010s1950s 2001 – Agile Manifest
  12. 12. M. Pochinok, 2016 Agile: it's not a process, it's the way we work People and interaction Working software Customer collaboration Responding to change Processes and tools Comprehensive documentation Contract negotiation Following an initial plan over
  13. 13. M. Pochinok, 2016 What is corporate culture? Our top priority is to meet customer needs through regular and early value delivery A team should regularly analyze possible ways to improve efficiency and make relevant adjustments to its working style Agile:it'snotaprocess,it'sthewaywework
  14. 14. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 14
  15. 15. M. Pochinok, 2016 Traditional approach Agile approach Top-down functional siloes Bottom-up cross-functional teams and tribes built around client needs Agile organization: key differentiators*) … … … … … Scaling aimed at outcome, 100% efficiency, and focus Structure Processes People Operations model *)From McKinsey presentation
  16. 16. M. Pochinok, 2016 Partial involvement in a project Full involvement in a project Sprint result (working product) demonstration and key stakeholder feedback collection Long-term bureaucratized process of getting requirement/result approvals from many customers Decision making is escalated to management Decision making is delegated to teams Traditional vs Agile Many review meetings Regular stand-ups Task setter hierarchy One task setter: product owner who makes decisions
  17. 17. M. Pochinok, 2016 Fixed requirements Requirements are updated as feedback is collected Personal KPI Team KPI Traditional vs Agile Non-iterative development Continuous feedback and visible progress Gantt chart with fixed sequence Scrum board supporting flexible priority management
  18. 18. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 18
  19. 19. M. Pochinok, 2016 Structure … … … … Tribe is a group of interrelated teams formed around a product (business objective) and responsible for business results Team is a cross-functional working group of specialists having skills, tools, authorities necessary to create a product Chapter is a group of specialists competent in the same field *)From McKinsey presentation Team 1 Team 2 Team 2 Team N Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter N Tribe
  20. 20. M. Pochinok, 2016 Structure TRIBE up to 150 persons or up to 1,500 if clusters are used CLUSTER up to 150 persons optionally TEAM up to 10-12 persons CHAPTER up to 10-12 persons "If you can't feed a team with two pizzas, it's too large" "Tribe/cluster size is limited by Dunbar's number, which is the number of people with whom one can maintain stable social relationships and is equal to 125-150" Jeff Bezos, Amazon CEO Robin Dunbar, a British anthropologist 20
  21. 21. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 21
  22. 22. M. Pochinok, 2016 Roles in Agile … … … … *)From McKinsey presentation Team 1 Team 2 Team 2 Team N Chapter 1 Chapter 2 Chapter N Tribe  Tribe leader  Tribe architect  Agile coach  Product owner  Scrum master  Chapter leader  Team member
  23. 23. M. Pochinok, 2016 Roles in Agile *)From McKinsey presentation … Team 1  Tribe leader is in charge of product management and achievement of tribe's business objectives  Tribe scrum master is in charge of release management, work synchronization, and process efficiency  Agile coach is in charge of Agile approach development and adoption  Product owner is in charge of releasing a product that meets customer needs  Scrum master is in charge of work process efficiency, collaboration with other teams and business units, and making a team more mature  Chapter leader is a member of one of the teams who is in charge of chapter administrative management and competence development  Team member is a specialist who participates in product creation within the scope of their competence
  24. 24. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 24
  25. 25. M. Pochinok, 2016 Working in Agile Super sprint is a tribe work cycle during which new versions of tribe products are created as a result of joint efforts of all teams Fixed duration: 12 weeks Consists of 6 or 12 sprints of tribe teams depending on a selected cycle (1-week or 2-week sprint) Sprint is a team work cycle during which a new version of a product is created May include market research, product analysis, prototyping, development, testing, implementation, and debugging processes or any other processes, depending on the tasks set Must have a specific purpose and is completed by the delivery of a new value for a product Fixed duration: 1 week or 2 weeks TRIBE TEAMS Super sprint 12 weeks Sprint 1 2 weeks Sprint 2 2 weeks Sprint 3 2 weeks Sprint 4 2 weeks Sprint 5 2 weeks Sprint 6 2 weeks 25
  26. 26. M. Pochinok, 2016 Tribe stream Epic Feature Story Description of customer experience with products or services Working in Agile Description of one element of customer experience or service Example of entire customer experience with products or services A way to achieve business results in a certain business segment
  27. 27. M. Pochinok, 2016 Working in Agile TRIBE TEAMS Super sprint 12 weeks Sprint 1 2 weeks Sprint 2 2 weeks Sprint 3 2 weeks Sprint 4 2 weeks Sprint 5 2 weeks Sprint 6 2 weeks Sprint 2 weeks Tue Wed Thu Fri Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Mon T2 T3 T1 T4 T5 Daily stand-up Team backlog update Sprint planning Demonstration Retrospective 27
  28. 28. M. Pochinok, 2016 Working in Agile *)From McKinsey presentation  Super sprint planning is forming an objective and a backlog for the next super sprint, team planning of backlog implementation and result achievement  Sprint planning is forming sprint objective and backlog  Daily stand-up is a daily meeting to make a day plan and define problems  Backlog update is a meeting to plan the next sprint  Demonstration is a working product demonstration, confirmation of sprint objective achievement, and feedback collection  Retrospective is discussion of factors that hinder effective performance, team work process improvement
  29. 29. M. Pochinok, 2016 •Agile challenges •How to overcome them •What is the biggest challenge?
  30. 30. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 30
  31. 31. M. Pochinok, 2016 Culture ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGES  Flattened structure  Cross-functional teams  High level of trust and authority delegation  New competencies and design thinking  Team goals  Evaluation by peers  Change of HR processes
  32. 32. M. Pochinok, 2016 T-shaped people
  33. 33. M. Pochinok, 2016 Culture. Personal qualities  Self-ogranization  Collaboration  Empathy  Acknowledgment of mistakes  Result-focused approach  Continuous self-improvement  Psychological safety
  34. 34. M. Pochinok, 2016 Culture CHANGE OF ATTITUDE AND VALUES • Client-centric approach • De-bossing • Team goals over personal ambitions • Enthusiastic and responsible team members • Work environment is not politically charged • Friendly motivating working climate • Team members are encouraged to try new things and not punished for mistakes • Engaging in informal communication and immediate feedback • Free communications flow • Living in uncertainty is normal
  35. 35. M. Pochinok, 2016 Culture SPACE REMODELING Open space Team zones Socializing zones Dress code
  36. 36. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 36
  37. 37. M. Pochinok, 2016 "Island changes"*) The rest of the company: • Continues operating as usual • New structure is adopted stage- by-stage • Individual elements of a new culture are implemented throughout the company Some employees act as a 'bridge' between old and new structures Pilot business units: • New flattened structure, small self-managed teams • Standalone workplaces • New motivation and outcome measurement principles • Digital culture *)M. Rozin
  38. 38. M. Pochinok, 2016 Potential criteria for an 'island' • Immediate significant effect for a client • External threat level • Limited group of business customers • Optimal scale
  39. 39. M. Pochinok, 2016 How to start Agile if you are not 'on the island' • Constantly ask yourself how the work that you do creates value for a client • Ask for and create feedback from end client • Build a cross-functional team to solve tasks • Minimize formal document flow in favor of a more hands-on approach • Encourage team members to experiment and prototype any solutions • Adopt a less hierarchical team structure • Establish 'organic' feedback • Introduce visual team task management: Backlog Board and persons in charge. Immediate significant effect for a client • Have regular stand-ups to discuss work progress
  40. 40. M. Pochinok, 2016 Contents  Agile organization  Agile organization: differentiators  Agile organization: structure  Roles in Agile  Working in Agile  Agile culture  Agile implementation  Agile HR 40
  41. 41. M. Pochinok, 2016 Talent Management Agile Talent Management Planning for 12 months (from strategies and budgets to development plans) Planning by quarter Unstructured appraisal practices / Large-scale and non-dedicated programs  Appraisal practices are unified so that to meet positing groups (according to a job catalog*)  Unique appraisal procedures for each position in a job catalog No individual development plan for every employee Every employee has their own development plan Appraisal results are often not connected with company training procedures Appraisal results are directly connected with company training procedures, including self-learning and trainings No regular screening of changes in values being appraised  Regular screening of changes in productivity, competence level, and training results of all employees  Changes in these values are considered for individual business units and organizational levels No single storage for personnel data HRM systems aggregate all information about employees (Success Factors, etc.) Agile HR
  42. 42. M. Pochinok, 2016 Talent Management Agile Talent Management Managers make TM decisions based on their own vision of company development OR Use benchmarking, i.e. best practices of other companies TM decisions are based on their company's data One long-term solution option both for company in general, and individual employees Several TM solutions options for possible scenarios both for company's high level, and individual employees No outsourcing Active outsourcing when internal resources are not enough Agile HR
  43. 43. M. Pochinok, 2016 Talent Management Agile Talent Management TM KPIs are either not measured at all, or measured irregularly Quarterly measured TM KPIs, including:  Employee turnover  Customer satisfaction  Personnel satisfaction, loyalty, and engagement  Position filling rate  (same development indicators for criteria being assessed)  etc. Focus of managerial, stable competencies Focus on evaluation and development of qualities that ensure efficiency in innovative environment Agile HR
  44. 44. M. Pochinok, 2016  Measurable (Data-driven)  Technology-savvy  Systemic (interrelated set of TM processes)  Medium-term planning (fast hiring, fast replacement)  Evaluation of qualities that ensure  Flexibility and change implementation Agile HR
  45. 45. M. Pochinok, 2016 Competencies of managers in Agile Talent Management According to DDI survey:  Implement changes  Being a leader (team building)  Encourage others to participate in mission critical tasks  Manage personnel of various age categories  Encourage creative and innovative ideas of employees

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