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LI-FILI-FI
What is Li-Fi?
 The term Li-Fi was coined by pure LiFi CSO,
Professor Herald Haas, and refers to light based
communicatio...
What is Li-Fi?
LiFi is the use of the visible light portion of the
electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information
at ver...
What is Li-FiWhat is Li-Fi
 Professor Harald Haas, from the University of Edinburgh
in the UK, is widely recognized as th...
 In October 2011, companies and industry groups formed the Li-
Fi Consortium, to promote high-speed optical wireless syst...
Optical Communication:
LiFi is a category of Optical Wireless
Communications (OWC). OWC includes infra-red
and ultra-viole...
 An optical communication system uses
a transmitter, which encodes a message into an
optical signal, a channel , which ca...
Optical wireless communications
 It is a form of optical communication in which
unguided visible, infrared(IR) ,
or ultra...
The proliferation of wireless
communications stands out as one
of the most significant phenomena
in the history of technol...
Transmission Range OWC
 Ultra-short range OWC
 Short range OWC
 Medium range OWC
 Long range OWC
 Ultra-long range OWC
Visible Light Communication
Visible light is only a small portion of the electromagnetic
spectrum.
The technology uses
flu...
How does LiFi work?
 Li-Fi is a Visible Light Communications (VLC) system for
data transmission. A simple VLC system has two qualifying
compo...
It is wireless and uses visible light
communication or infra-red and near
ultraviolet (instead of radio frequency
waves) s...
Li-Fi features include benefits to the
capacity, energy efficiency, safety and
security of a wireless system with a
number...
a) Capacity :a) Capacity :
 Bandwidth: The visible light spectrum is plentiful (10,000
more than RF spectrum), unlicensed...
b) Efficiency
 Low cost: Requires fewer components than radio
technology.
 Energy: LED illumination is already efficient...
c) Safetyc) Safety
 Safe: Life on earth has evolved through
exposure to visible light. There are no
known safety or healt...
d)d) Security
 Containment: It is difficult to eavesdrop on Li-Fi
signals since the signal is confined to a closely
defin...
Technology Detail:
Wi-Fi vs. Li-Fi:
A fundamental communications principle is
that the maximum data transfer possible
scales with the electro...
Light frequencies on the electromagnetic spectrum are
underused, while to either side is congested. Philip Ronan,
CC BY-SA
Comparison:
Applications of Li-Fi:
 RF Spectrum Relief: Excess capacity demands of cellular
networks can be off-loaded to Li-Fi netwo...
Applications of Li-Fi:
 Hospital & Healthcare: Li-Fi emits no electromagnetic
interference and so does not interfere with...
Applications of Li-Fi:
 RF Avoidance: Some people claim they are hypersensitive
to radio frequencies and are looking for ...
Current development:
 PureLiFi and Lucibel industrialized LiFi
luminaries:
Edinburgh, 25 November 2015 –
pureLiFi, the li...
Current development:
 Li-1st
• The Li-1st provides the first major opportunity
for customers to rapidly develop and test
...
 Li-Flame:
• The Li-Flame is the next generation of the
world’s first ubiquitous high-speed wireless
network solution usi...
 Li-Flame delivers:
• Half duplex communication with a 10Mbps downlink and
10Mbps uplink over a range of up to three mete...
 Li-Flame delivers:
• Safe wireless communication in environments where
radio frequencies are undesirable or unavailable
...
Current development:
 Li-Flame Ceiling Unit (CU):
• Data and power via standard Ethernet
port
• Simple installation
• Con...
Current development:
 Li-Flame Desktop Unit (DU)
• Connects to client device via USB
• 10Mbps infrared uplink to ceiling ...
pureLiFi
pureLiFi
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pureLiFi

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pureLiFi

  1. 1. LI-FILI-FI
  2. 2. What is Li-Fi?  The term Li-Fi was coined by pure LiFi CSO, Professor Herald Haas, and refers to light based communications technology that delivers a high- speed, bidirectional networked, mobile communications in a similar manner as Wi-Fi. Li- Fi can be used to off-load data from existing Wi-Fi networks, implementations may be used to provide capacity for the greater downlink demand such that existing wireless or wired network infrastructure may be used in a complementary fashion.
  3. 3. What is Li-Fi? LiFi is the use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information at very high speeds. This is in contrast to established forms of wireless communication such as Wi-Fi which use traditional radio frequency (RF) signals to transmit data. With LiFi, data is transmitted by modulating the intensity of the light, which is then received by a photo-sensitive detector, and the light signal is demodulated into electronic form. This modulation is performed in such a way that it is not perceptible to the human eye.
  4. 4. What is Li-FiWhat is Li-Fi  Professor Harald Haas, from the University of Edinburgh in the UK, is widely recognized as the original founder of Li-Fi. He coined the term Li-Fi and is Chair of Mobile Communications at the University of Edinburgh and co- founder of pure LiFi.  The general term visible light communication (VLC) includes any use of the visible light portion of the electromagnetic spectrum to transmit information. The D- Light project at Edinburgh's Institute for Digital Communications was funded from January 2010 to January 2012 Haas promoted this technology in his 2011 TED Global talk and helped start a company to market it Pure LiFi, formerly purely, is an original equipment manufacturer (OEM) firm set up to commercialize Li-Fi products for integration with existing LED-lighting systems.
  5. 5.  In October 2011, companies and industry groups formed the Li- Fi Consortium, to promote high-speed optical wireless systems and to overcome the limited amount of radio-based wireless spectrum available by exploiting a completely different part of the electromagnetic spectrum.  A number of companies offer uni-directional VLC products, which is not the same as Li-Fi VLC technology was exhibited in 2012 using Li-Fi . By August 2013, data rates of over 1.6 G/bits were demonstrated over a single color LED. In September 2013, a press release said that Li-Fi, or VLC systems in general, do not require line-of-sight conditions. In October 2013, it was reported Chinese manufacturers were working on Li-Fi development kits  In April 2014, the Russian company Stins Coman announced the development of a Li-Fi wireless local network called Beam Caster. Their current module transfers data at 1.25 gigabytes per second but they foresee boosting speeds up to 5 GB/second in the near future. In 2014 a new record was established by Sisoft (a Mexican company) that was able to transfer data at speeds of up to 10Gbps across a light spectrum emitted by LED lamps.
  6. 6. Optical Communication: LiFi is a category of Optical Wireless Communications (OWC). OWC includes infra-red and ultra-violet communications as well as visible light. However, LiFi is unique in that the same visible light energy used for illumination may also be used for communication. It is also known as optical telecommunication, is communication at a distance using light to carry information. It can be performed visually or by using electronic devices. The earliest basic forms of optical communication date back several millennia, while the earliest electrical device created to do so was the photo phone , invented in 1880.
  7. 7.  An optical communication system uses a transmitter, which encodes a message into an optical signal, a channel , which carries the signal to its destination, and a receiver, which reproduces the message from the received optical signal  Optical fiber is the most common type of channel for optical communications. The transmitters in optical fiber links are generally light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or laser diodes. Infrared light, rather than visible light is used more commonly, because optical fibers transmit infrared wavelengths with less attenuation and dispersion
  8. 8. Optical wireless communications  It is a form of optical communication in which unguided visible, infrared(IR) , or ultraviolet(UV) light is used to carry a signal.  OWC systems operating in the visible band (390– 750 nm) are commonly referred to as visible light communication (VLC). VLC systems take advantage of light emitting diodes (LEDs) which can be pulsed at very high speeds without noticeable effect on the lighting output and human eye. VLC can be possibly used in a wide range of applications including wireless local area networks, wireless personal area networks and vehicular networks among others.
  9. 9. The proliferation of wireless communications stands out as one of the most significant phenomena in the history of technology. Wireless technologies have become essential much more quickly during the last four decades and they will be a key element of society progress for the foreseeable future. The proliferation of wireless communications stands out as one of the most significant phenomena in the history of technology. Wireless technologies have become essential much more quickly during the last four decades and they will be a key element of society progress for the foreseeable future.
  10. 10. Transmission Range OWC  Ultra-short range OWC  Short range OWC  Medium range OWC  Long range OWC  Ultra-long range OWC
  11. 11. Visible Light Communication Visible light is only a small portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The technology uses fluorescent lamps (ordinary lamps, not special communications devices) to transmit signals at 10 k/bits, or LED for up to 500 Mbit/s. Low rate data transmissions at 1 and 2 kilometers (0.6 and 1.2 mi) were demonstrated. RONJA achieves full Ethernet speed (10 Mbit/s) over the same distance thanks to larger optics and more powerful LEDs.
  12. 12. How does LiFi work?
  13. 13.  Li-Fi is a Visible Light Communications (VLC) system for data transmission. A simple VLC system has two qualifying components: 1) At least one device with a photodiode able to receive light signals and 2) A light source equipped with a signal processing unit.  Li-Fi (Light Fidelity) is a bidirectional, high speed and fully networked wireless communication technology similar to Wi-Fi. Coined by Prof. Harald Haas, Li-Fi is a subset of optical wireless communications (OWC) and can be a complement to RF communication (Wi-Fi or Cellular network), or a replacement in contexts of data broadcasting. It is so far measured to be about 100 times faster than Wi-Fi, reaching speeds of 224 gigabits per second.
  14. 14. It is wireless and uses visible light communication or infra-red and near ultraviolet (instead of radio frequency waves) spectrum, parts of optical wireless communications technology, which carries much, more information, and has been proposed as a solution to the RF-bandwidth limitations. A complete solution includes an industry led standardization process
  15. 15. Li-Fi features include benefits to the capacity, energy efficiency, safety and security of a wireless system with a number of key benefits over Wi-Fi but are inherently a complementary technology. Features and Standards:
  16. 16. a) Capacity :a) Capacity :  Bandwidth: The visible light spectrum is plentiful (10,000 more than RF spectrum), unlicensed and free to use.  Data density: Li-Fi can achieve about 1000 times the data density of Wi-Fi because visible light can be well contained in a tight illumination area whereas RF tends to spread out and cause interference.  High speed: Very high data rates can be achieved due to low interference, high device bandwidths and high intensity optical output.  Planning: Capacity planning is simple since there tends to be illumination infrastructure where people wish to communicate, and good signal strength can literally be seen.
  17. 17. b) Efficiency  Low cost: Requires fewer components than radio technology.  Energy: LED illumination is already efficient and the data transmission requires -negligible additional power. Environment: RF transmission and propagation in water is extremely difficult but Li-Fi works well in this environment.
  18. 18. c) Safetyc) Safety  Safe: Life on earth has evolved through exposure to visible light. There are no known safety or health concerns for this technology.  Non-hazardous: The transmission of light avoids the use of radio frequencies which can dangerously interfere with electronic circuitry in certain environments .
  19. 19. d)d) Security  Containment: It is difficult to eavesdrop on Li-Fi signals since the signal is confined to a closely defined illumination area and will not travel through walls.  Control: Data may be directed from one device to another and the user can see where the data is going; there is no need for additional security such as pairing for RF interconnections such as Bluetooth.
  20. 20. Technology Detail:
  21. 21. Wi-Fi vs. Li-Fi: A fundamental communications principle is that the maximum data transfer possible scales with the electromagnetic frequency bandwidth available. The radio frequency spectrum is heavily used and regulated, and there just isn’t enough additional space to satisfy the growth in demand. So Li-Fi has the potential to replace radio and microwave frequency Wi-Fi.
  22. 22. Light frequencies on the electromagnetic spectrum are underused, while to either side is congested. Philip Ronan, CC BY-SA
  23. 23. Comparison:
  24. 24. Applications of Li-Fi:  RF Spectrum Relief: Excess capacity demands of cellular networks can be off-loaded to Li-Fi networks where available. This is especially effective on the downlink where bottlenecks tend to occur.  Smart Lighting: Any private or public lighting including street lamps can be used to provide Li-Fi hotspots and the same communications and sensor infrastructure can be used to monitor and control lighting and data.  Mobile Connectivity: Laptops, smart phones, tablets and other mobile devices can interconnect directly using Li-Fi. Short range links give very high data rates and also provides security.  Hazardous Environments: Li-Fi provides a safe alternative to electromagnetic interference from radio frequency communications in environments such as mines and petrochemical plants.
  25. 25. Applications of Li-Fi:  Hospital & Healthcare: Li-Fi emits no electromagnetic interference and so does not interfere with medical instruments, nor is it interfered with by MRI scanners.  Aviation: Li-Fi can be used to reduce weight and cabling and add flexibility to seating layouts in aircraft passenger cabins where LED lights are already deployed. In-flight entertainment (IFE) systems can also be supported and integrated with passengers’ own mobile devices.  Underwater Communications: Due to strong signal absorption in water, RF use is impractical. Acoustic waves have extremely low bandwidth and disturb marine life. Li-Fi provides a solution for short-range communications.  Vehicles & Transportation: LED headlights and tail-lights are being introduced. Street lamps, signage and traffic signals are also moving to LED. This can be used for vehicle-to-vehicle and vehicle-to-roadside communications. This can be applied for road safety and traffic management.
  26. 26. Applications of Li-Fi:  RF Avoidance: Some people claim they are hypersensitive to radio frequencies and are looking for an alternative. Li-Fi is a good solution to this problem.  Location Based Services (LBS): Highly accurate location-specific information services such as advertising and navigation that enables the recipient to receive appropriate, pertinent information in a timely manner and location.  Toys: Many toys incorporate LED lights and these can be used to enable extremely low-cost communication between interactive toys.
  27. 27. Current development:  PureLiFi and Lucibel industrialized LiFi luminaries: Edinburgh, 25 November 2015 – pureLiFi, the light communications technology company that leads the market in development and commercialization of LiFi (the high speed, bidirectional, networked and mobile wireless communications using light) andLucibel, the French company that specializes in the design of new-generation lighting solutions based on the LED technology, are to co-develop and market Europe’s first, fully industrialized LiFi luminaire.
  28. 28. Current development:  Li-1st • The Li-1st provides the first major opportunity for customers to rapidly develop and test VLC applications for cost-effective, high-speed data communication solutions that utilize commercial light Li-1st. • The Li-1st has been created to provide a platform for pilot projects with pure LiFi partners, and to establish engagement on pure LiFi’s high-speed technology path, upon which this product is the initial step. • The system will be available on limited release from January 2014.
  29. 29.  Li-Flame: • The Li-Flame is the next generation of the world’s first ubiquitous high-speed wireless network solution using VLC. Li-Flame technology delivers data densities substantially greater than state-of-the-art Wi-Fi solutions and its inherent security properties eliminate unwanted external network intrusion. In addition, the merger of illumination with wireless communications provides a measurable reduction in both infrastructure complexity and energy consumption Current development:
  30. 30.  Li-Flame delivers: • Half duplex communication with a 10Mbps downlink and 10Mbps uplink over a range of up to three meters with standard light fixtures; this results in a data rate density of 2Mbps per square meter • Full mobility (portable, battery-powered desktop unit) with high data rate due to dense installation of Li-Fi access points (APs) • Multiple users per Li-Fi AP, supported through multiple access, while retaining high bandwidth for each user • Secure wireless communications constrained by walls, eliminating the risk of signal leakage to external eavesdroppers Current development:
  31. 31.  Li-Flame delivers: • Safe wireless communication in environments where radio frequencies are undesirable or unavailable • More flexible construction environments with the elimination of communication cabling • An extensive range of wireless communication applications including and beyond existing Wi-Fi • A cost-effective delivery of light and data via a single infrastructure • Multiple APs throughout an indoor space form an auto- cellular network, allowing users to move from one AP to the next without any interruption in its high-speed data stream Current development:
  32. 32. Current development:  Li-Flame Ceiling Unit (CU): • Data and power via standard Ethernet port • Simple installation • Connects to an LED light fixture to form an auto-cell over a wide area • Multiple accesses • Handover control enables seamless switching between APs
  33. 33. Current development:  Li-Flame Desktop Unit (DU) • Connects to client device via USB • 10Mbps infrared uplink to ceiling unit • Handover capable, allowing user to move from one AP to the next without losing the high-speed data connection • Transceiver swivel head can be adjusted by user to optimize the connection • Battery-powered and portable

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