Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Earned Value Analysis - EVA

14,633 views

Published on

Published in: Engineering
  • Login to see the comments

Earned Value Analysis - EVA

  1. 1. I          AACE International  1265 Suncrest Towne Centre Drive  Morgantown, WV 26505‐1876  USA.        Technical Paper for CCC Examination  A Technical Paper is submitted to AACEI in partial fulfillment of the requirements for recognition as Certified  Cost Consultant.        Earned Value Analysis – EVA  A Project Management Tool              Ahmed Bin Ali Bamasdoos    Candidate Constituent Number 66828  (Exam Calendar 8th  March, 2012)      Date: 2nd  January, 2012       
  2. 2. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      II      Table of Contents  List of Tables & Figures………………………………….………………………………………………………………..……III  Abstract…………………………………………..…………………………………………….........................................IV  1. Introduction…………………………………………………………………………………………………….……..……....1    2. EVM History, Rewards & Recognitions………………………………………………………..……………….……2  3. EVM Objectives…………………………………………………………………………………………….…………….……3  4. What is EVM .......................................................................................................................3  5. Why use EVM......................................................................................................................3  6. EVM Advantages & Disadvantages………………………….……………………………………….……………….4  7. Earned Value Analysis EVA Presentation, Definitions & Explanation  7.1. EVM Definitions……………………………………………………………………….……………………………..……….5  7.2. Earned Value Analysis (EVA)……………………………………………………………………………..……………..5  7.3. EVA Terminology……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..6  7.4. EVA Formulas & Interpretation………………………………………………………………………………………..7  7.5. EVA Key Dimension & Other Elements……………………………………………………………………………..8  7.5.1 Planned Value (PV)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………8  7.5.2 Earned Value (EV)……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..9  7.5.3 Actual Cost (AC)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………10  7.5.4 Schedule Variance (SV)…………………………………………………………………………………………………....11  7.5.5 Cost Variance (CV)…………………………………………………………………………………………………………….12  7.5.6 Schedule Performance Index (SPI)…………………………………………………………………………………...12  7.5.7 Cost Performance Index (CPI)…………………………………………………………………………………………..13  7.5.8 Budget at Completion (BAC) …………………………………………………………….……………………………...13 
  3. 3. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      III    7.5.9 Estimate at Completion (EAC)…………………………………………………………………………….……………..13  7.5.10  Estimate to Completion (ETC)………………………………………………………………………….….…………….14  7.5.11  Variance at Completion (VAC)……………………………………………………………………….………………….15  8. Illustrative explanation of Earned Value Analysis……………………………………….…….…….………....15  8.1 Calculation of Variations (SV & CV)…………………………………………………………………….……………………16  8.2 Calculation of Variations % (SV % & CV %)……………………………………………………….……………….…….16  8.3 Calculation of Index (SPI & CPI)…………………………………………………………………………………………......17  8.4 Calculation of Forecast (EAC, BAC, ETC, VAC & TCPI)………………………………………..……………………..18  9. Earned Value Analysis (EVA) Graphical Presentation  9.1. EVA “ Unde Budget  & Behind Schedule”. ………………………………………………………….…….…………..19  9.2. EVA “Over Budget & Behind Schedule”………………………………………………………………….….…………..20  9.3. EVA “Under Budget & Ahead Schedule”………………………………………………………………….….…………20  9.4. EVA “Over Budget & Ahead Schedule”………………………………………………………………………….…….…21  10. Conclusion……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……..22  11. Summary………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….……..23  12. Bibliography & References……………………………………………………………………………………….……..24               
  4. 4. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      IV      List of Tables  Table 1.1: Earned Value Analysis Terminology…………………………………………………………………..………6  Table 1.2: Earned Value Analysis Formulas & Interpretation………………………………………………………7   Table 2.1: EVA KEY DIMENSION (PV, EV & AC) table for a project ABC………………………………….…. 15  Table 2.2: Calculation of Variations (Schedule Variance & Cost Variance) for Project ABC………...16  Table 2.3: Calculation of Index (SPI & CPI) for Project ABC…………………………………………………….….17  Table 2.4: Calculation of Forecast (EAC, BAC, ETC, VAC & TCPI) for Project ABC…………….…………..18     List of Figures      Figure 1.1: Cumulative PV Curve for Project XYZ…………………………………………………………….……..9    Figure 1.2: Cumulative PV vs. EV Curves for Project XYZ………………………………………………………..10    Figure 1.3: Cumulative PV vs. EV vs. AC Curves for Project XYZ……………………………………………..11    Figure 2.1: Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Under Budget & Behind Schedule)………19    Figure 2.2: Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Over Budget & Behind Schedule)………...20    Figure 2.3: Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Under Budget & Ahead Schedule)……….20    Figure 2.4: Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Over Budget & Ahead Schedule)………….21 
  5. 5. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      V      Abstract  “Earned Value Management (EVM)” helps the project team to measure project performance. It is a  systematic project management process used to find variances in projects based on the comparison of  worked performed and work planned. EVM is used on the cost and schedule control and can be very  useful in project forecasting. The project baseline is an essential component of EVM and serves as a  references point for all EVM related activities.             Earned Value Analysis is a best method of calculation to integrates cost,  schedule and scope and can be used to forecast future performance and project completion dates. It  is an “early warning” program / project management tool that enable project team to identify and  control the problems before they become insurmountable, it allows projects to be managed better –  on time, on budget.  Key Words:  (Earned Value Analysis), (Project Control), (Project Management)             
  6. 6. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      1      1.Introduction   “Earned  Value  Management  (EVM)”  is  a  program  management  technique  that  used  “work  in  progress”  to  indicate  what  will  happened  to  work  in  the  future.  EVM  is  an  enhancement  over  traditional  accounting  progress  measure.  Traditional  methods  focus  on  planned  accomplishment  (expenditure)  and  actual  cost.  Earned  Value  Analysis  goes  one  step  further  and  examines  actual  accomplishment. This gives to project team a greater insight into potential risk areas. With clearer  picture, project team can create risk mitigation plans based on the actual cost, schedule and technical  progress  of  the  work,  it  is  an  “early  warning”  program/project  management  tool  that  enables  managers to identify and control problems before they become insurmountable. It allows projects to  be managed better – on time on budget. EVM System is not a specific system or tool set, but rather, a  set of guidelines that guide a company’s management control system.       
  7. 7. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      2      2.EVM History, Reward & Recognition  Ref: DoD USA, “Earned Value Management Implementation” Guide Oct, 2006”,  Signed by “KEITH D. ERNST” Director  Defense Contract Management Agency).    According to the NASA headquarters library, the first version of Earned Value Management was  developed by the Department of Defense (DoD) USA in 1967, to established the Cost/Schedule  Control System Criteria (C/SCSC) to standardize contractor requirements for reporting cost and  schedule performance on major contracts. Since 2005, EVM has been a part of general federal project  risk management. Today EVM is a mandatory requirement of the US government. The Office of  Management and Budget (OMB). Promotes use of EVM as a preferred performance‐based  management system to manage software projects. EVM is also used in the private sector by  companies in a variety of industries, consulting firms and educational establishments.   Some of the most well known organizations practicing EVM are:  • NASA  • Project Management Institute (PMI)  • Society of Cost Estimating and Analysis  • Federal Acquisition Institute  •  Acquisition Management (UK)  Based  on  reports  of  the  General  Accounting  Office  (GAO)  in  August  1996  a  memorandum  of  understanding  concerning  common  cost  and  schedule  management  for  acquisitions  was  signed  by  Australia, Canada, and the Unites States. This gives international recognition to EVM worldwide. The  NASA  Office  of  Chief  Engineer  is  sponsoring  an  “Earned  Value  Management  AVM  Award  of  Excellence” to present at the NASA PM Challenge Conference.    
  8. 8. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      3      3.EVM Objective  The  Main  objective  for  EVM  is  tool  to  “measuring  a  project’s  progress  at  any  given  point  in  time,  forecasting it’s a completion date and final cost”, and analyzing variances in the schedule and budget  as  the  project  proceeds.  It  compares  the  planned  amount  of  work  with  what  has  actually  been  completed, to determine if the cost, schedule, and work accomplished are progressing in accordance  with the plan. As work is completed, it is considered as “Earned”.     4.What is Earned Value Management (EVM)?  • Earned  Value  Management  (EVM)  is  an  incremental  methodology  for  measuring  project  performance  by  determining  cost  and  schedule  performance  of  a  project  by  comparing  “planned” worked with “accomplished” work in terms of the dollar value assigned to the work,  and determining the need to recommend corrective actions.  • EVM is a “Management Tool” which provides a snapshot of project performance at a point in  time. And compares where the project is now with previous work accomplished and where the  project was planned to be. And also it serves as an “early warning” system to detect deficient  or endangered progress.    5.Why use Earned Value Management (EVM)?  • When you manage project performance by just comparing planned to actual results, you could  easily be on time but overspend according to your plan. 
  9. 9. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      4    • Using EVM is a better method because it integrates cost, time and work done and can be used  to forecast future performance and project completion dates and costs.  • Earned value analysis results should be a major part of project reporting.  • EVM is the basis for course correction and will lead to new forecasted completion cost, change  requests and other items that will need to communicate.  • EVM provides an accurate picture of contract status and supports mutual goals of contractors  and customer.    6. EVM Advantages & Disadvantages:  S.No.  Descriptions  EVM Advantages  EVM Disadvantages  1  VARIANCE  ANALYSIS  Shows Current Status in term of  Cost & Schedule.  Time consuming and requires  experienced effort to measure and  analyze the performance.  2  FORECASTING  It enables predictions of cost at  completion and completion date.  It depends on reliable  measurements that can be difficult  to achieve for some cost types.  3  EFFICIENCY  Provides performance indices  identifying area under of ever  performing and enquiring  corrective action.  Past performance is not necessarily  an indication of future performance. 4  ESTIMATING  ACCURACY  Provides feedback of the actual  performance against the baseline  estimates  It does not take into account risks  and uncertainties  5  DECESIONS   Provides triggers for escalating  problems and helps in taking  sudden decisions.   It Requires a compatible cost  tracking system and it will be never  100% accurate. So sometimes  decision can take wrongly.     
  10. 10. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      5      7. Earned Value Analysis  Definitions, Presentation & Explanation    7.1   Earned Value Definitions: (Ref: “Projectsmart.co.uk” By Duncan Haughty, PMP)  NASA defines it as, "An integrated management control system for assessing, understanding  and quantifying what a contractor or field activity is achieving with program dollars. EVM  provides project management with objective, accurate and timely data for effective decision  making."    Englert and Associates, Inc define it as, "A method for measuring project performance. It  compares the amount of work that was planned with what was actually accomplished to  determine if cost and schedule performance is as planned."  7.2   Earned Value Analysis (EVA)  Earned Value Analysis is an industry standard method of measuring a project’s progress at any  given point in time, forecasting its completion date and final cost, and analyzing variances in  the schedule and budget as the project proceeds. It compare the planned amount of work with  has actually been completed, to determine if the cost, schedule and work accomplished are  progressing in accordance with the plan. As work is complete, it is considered as “Earned”.     
  11. 11. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      6      7.3   Earned Value Analysis Terminology – Table 1.1         (Ref: “PMI PMstudy Targeting Success” PMstudy.com)  Acronym  Term  Description  PV  Planned Value  The authorized budget assigned to the schedule  work to be accomplished for a schedule activity or  WBS component.   (BCWS)  (Budget Cost of Work  Scheduled)  EV  Earned Value  The value of work performed expressed in terms  of the approved budget assigned to that work for a  schedule activity or WBS component.  (BCWP)  (Budget Cost of Work  Performed)  AC  Actual Cost (Actual Budget  Work Performed)  Actual Cost of work completed that is incurred and  recorded  SV  Schedule Variance  A measure of the schedule performance on a  project. (Negative SV: Behind the Schedule)  (Positive SV: Ahead of schedule)  CV  Cost Variance  A measure of the cost performance on a project.  (Negative CV: Over Budget) (Positive CV: Under  Budget)  CPI  Cost Performance Index  A measure of cost efficiency on a project. The  value got for 1 $ of actual cost  SPI  Schedule Performance Index  A measure of schedule efficiency on a project.  Progress as a % of Planned Progress  EAC  Estimate at Completion  The expected total cost when the defined scope of  work will be completed.        1. Original estimated assumptions no longer valid  2. Current variance are a typical, similar variances  will not occur in the future  3. Current variances are typical, Similar variances  may occur in future  4. EAC taking both CPI and SPI into account  BAC  Budget at Completion  Budget for the whole project  ETC  Estimate to Completion  From a particular point in time, how much more  time is required to complete the project  VAC  Variance at Completion  Over or Under Budget  TCPI  To Complete Performance  Index  The work remaining divided by the funds  remaining,         1. Equation Expressed in terms of EAC:        2. Equation Expressed in terms of BAC:     
  12. 12. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      7      7.4   Earned Value Analysis Formulas & Interpretation – Table 1.2         (Ref: “PMI PMstudy Targeting Success” PMstudy.com)  Acronym  Formula  Analysis  PV     What is the estimated value of the work planned to be  done?  (BCWS)  EV     What is the estimated value of the work actually  accomplished? (BCWP)  AC     What is the actual cost incurred?  SV  EV – PV  NEGATIVE is behind the Schedule (or) POSITIVE is ahead the  Schedule.  CV  EV – AC  NEGATIVE is over the budget (or) POSITIVE is under the  budget.  CPI  EV/AC = BAC/EAC  LESS THAN 1.0 is over the budget (or) GREATER THAN 1.0 is  under the budget.  SPI  EV/PV  LESS THAN 1.0 is behind the Schedule (or) GREATER THAN  1.0 is ahead the Schedule.  EAC        Note:  There are  many ways  to calculate  EAC    AC + ETC  Actually Cost plus new estimate cost for remaining work.  Used when original estimate was fundamentally flawed.  AC + BAC – EV  Actual cost plus remaining budget. Used when current  variances are atypical.  AC + {(BAC ‐ EV)/CPI} OR BAC/CPI  Actual cost plus remaining budget modified by  performance. Used when current variances are atypical.  AC + {(BAC ‐ EV)/(CPI*SPI)  Actual cost plus remaining budget modified by  performance. While both taken into account CPI & SPI  BAC  EAC * CPI  How much did you BUDGET for the TOTAL PROJECT  ETC  EAC – AC  How much more will the project Cost?  VAC  BAC – EAC  How much over budget will we be at the end of project?  TCPI           PROJECTED VALUE LESS THAN 1.0 is Over the Budget (or)  PROJECTED VALUE GREATER THAN 1.0 is Under the Budget.  (BAC‐EV) / (EAC ‐ AC)  (BAC‐EV) / (BAC ‐ AC) 
  13. 13. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      8      7.5   Earned Value Analysis Key Dimensions   EVA develops and monitors three key dimensions for each work package and control account:  7.5.1 BCWS = Planned Value (PV)  7.5.2  BCWP = Earned Value (EV)  7.5.3  ACWP = Actual Cost (AC)  As of first quarter of year 2002 there is shifting in using the below terms as above.  7.5.1    Budgeted Cost of Work Schedule (BCWS)  7.5.2    Budgeted Cost of Work Performed (BCWP)    7.5.3    Actual Cost of Work Performed (ACWP)            7.5.1 Planned Value (PV) or (BCWS) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Planned value (PV) is the authorized budget assigned to the work to be accomplished for  an activity or work breakdown structure component. It includes the detailed authorized  work, plus the budget for such authorized work, allocated by phase over the life of the  project. The total of the PV is sometimes referred to as the performance measurement  baseline (PMB). The total PV for the project is also known as Budget at Completion (BAC).  Planned Value is usually charted showing the cumulative resources budgeted across the  project schedule. Figure 1.1 shows the Planned Value S‐curve for Project XYZ.     
  14. 14. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      9    10 40 64 96 134 176 220 236 256 268 284 300 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 P…           Figure 1.1 ‐ Cumulative Planned Value for Project XYZ.    7.5.2 Earned Value (EV) or (BCWP) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Earned value (EV) is the value of work performed expressed in terms of the approved  budget assigned to the work for an activity or work breakdown structure component. It is  the authorized work that has been completed, plus the authorized budget for such  completed work. The EV being measured must be related to the PV baseline (PMB), and  the EV measured cannot be greater than the authorized PV budget for a component. The  term EV is often used to describe the percentage completion of a project. Project  Managers monitor EV, both incrementally to determine current status and cumulatively to  determine the long term performance trends. Figure 2.2 Shows the Earned Value for the  project XYZ at the month of July 2011 mark, and indicates that less work executed than  planned has been accomplished.  Duration in Months PROJECT XYZ – Planned Value Data Date 
  15. 15. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      10    10 40 64 96 134 176 220 236 256 268 284 300 176 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 PV EV         Figure 1.2 ‐ Cumulative Planned Value and Earned Value for Project XYZ.    7.5.3 Actual Cost (AC) or (ACWP) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Actual  Cost  (AC)  is  the  total  cost  actually  incurred  and  recorded  in  accomplishing  work  performed  for  an  activity  or  work  breakdown  structure  component.  It  is  the  total  cost  incurred in accomplishing the work that the EV measured. The AV has to correspond in  definition to whatever was budgeted for in the PV and measured in the EV. (e.g. direct  hours only, direct costs only, or all costs including indirect costs). The AC will have no upper  limit; whatever is spend to achieve the EV will be measured. Figure 1.3 shows the Actual  Cost for Project XYZ at the month of July, 2011 mark, and indicates that the organization  has spent less than it planned to spend, to achieve the work performed to date but it is  more than work executed.    Duration in Months PROJECT XYZ – Planned Value & Earned Value  Data Date 
  16. 16. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      11    10 40 64 96 134 176 220 236 256 268 284 300 176 200 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 P V E V         Figure 1.3 ‐ Cumulative Planned Value and Earned Value for Project XYZ.    7.5.4 Schedule Variance (SV) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Schedule Variance (SV) is a measured of schedule performance on a project. It is equal to  the earned value (EV) minus the planned value (PV). The EVM schedule variance is a useful  metric  in  that  it  can  indicate  a  project  falling  behind  its  baseline  schedule.  The  EVM  schedule variance will ultimately equal zero when the project is completed because all the  planned values will have been earned. EVM SVs are best used in conjunction with critical  path methodology (CPM) scheduling and risk management. Equation: SV = EV – PV          Duration in Months PROJECT XYZ – Planned & Earned Values & Actual Cost  Data Date 
  17. 17. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      12      7.5.5 Cost Variance (CV) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Cost Variance (CV) is a measured of cost performance on a project. It is equal to the earned  value (EV) minus the actual cost (AC). The cost variance at the end of the project will be the  difference between the budget at completion (BAC) and the actual amount spent. The EVM  CV is particularly critical because it indicates the relationship of physical performance to  the costs spent. Any negative EVM CV is often non‐recoverable to the project.   Equation: CV = EV ‐ AC  The SV and CV can be converted to efficiency indicators to reflect the cost and schedule  performance of any project for comparison against all other projects or within a portfolio  of projects. The variances and indices are useful for determining project status and  providing a basis for estimating project cost and schedule outcome.    7.5.6 Schedule Performance Index (SPI) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Schedule Performance Index (SPI) is a measure of progress achieved compared to progress  planned on a project. It is sometimes used in conjunction with the cost performance index  (CPI) to forecast the final project completion estimates. An SPI value less than 1.0 indicates  less work was completed than was planned, An SPI greater than 1.0 indicates that more  work  was  completed  than  was  planned.    Since  the  SPI  measure  all  project  work,  the  performance on the critical path must also be analyzed to determine whether the project 
  18. 18. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      13    will finish ahead of or behind its planned finish date. The SPI is equal to the ration of the EV  to the PV. Equation: SPI = EV / PV.    7.5.7 Cost Performance Index (CPI) (Ref: “PMI PMBOK GUIDE” Fourth Edition)  Cost Performance Index (CPI) is a measure of the value of work completed compared to  the  actual cost  or  progress  made  on  the  project.  It  is  considered  the  most  critical  EVM  metric and measure the cost efficiency for the work complete. A CPI value less than 1.0  indicates a cost overran for work completed. A CPI value greater than 1.0 indicates a cost  under  run  of  performance  to  date.  The  CPI  is  equal  to  the  ratio  of  the  EV  to  the  AC.   Equation:  CPI = EV/AC.    7.5.8 Budget at Completion (BAC)   Budget at Completion (BAC) is the sum of the entire budget value that has been previously  established for the work to be performed on a project, or on components within a project  such as schedule activity or WBS component. The budget at completion also called as the  total planned value of the project.  Equation: BAC = EAC * CPI    7.5.9 Estimate at Completion (EAC)   Estimate at Completion (EAC) is an input output device that is used to measure the  expected total cost of a particular schedule activity, a WBS component or of the project as  a whole. It is a forecast of most likely total project costs based on project performance and 
  19. 19. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      14    risk quantification. At the start of the project BAC and EAC will be equal. EAC will vary from  BAC only when AC varies from PV. Most common forecasting techniques are some of:  7.5.9.1   EAC = Actual cost to date plus new estimate for all remaining work. This  approach is most often used when past performance shows that the original  estimating assumptions were fundamentally flawed, or they are no longer  relevant to a change in conditions.  7.5.9.2   EAC = Actual Cost to date plus remaining budget. This approach is most  often used when current variances are seen as atypical and the project  management team expectations are that similar variance will not occur in the  future.  7.5.9.3   EAC = Actual Cost to date plus the remaining budget modified by a  performance factor, Often the cumulative cost performance index (CPI). This  approach is most often used when current variances are seen as typical of  future variances  7.5.9.4   EAC = BAC modified by performance factor, cumulative cost performance  index (CPI). This approach is most often used when no variances from BAC  have occurred.    7.5.10 Estimate to Complete (ETC)   Estimate to Complete the difference between Estimate at Completion (EAC) and Actual  Cost (AC), this is the estimated additional cost to complete the project form any given  time.  Equation: ETC = EAC – AC 
  20. 20. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      15      7.5.11 Variance at Completion  (VAC)   The difference between Budget at Completion (BAC) and Estimate at Completion (EAC).  This is the dollar value by which the project will over or under the budget.   Equation: VAC = BAC – EAC    8 Illustrative explanation of Earned Value Analysis.  The information given below for Project ABC cumulative PV, EV & AC and project duration is 12 months.  Earned Value Analysis (PV, EV & AC) for Project ABC “As of July, 2011 – Table 2.1  DESCRIPTION  Jan‐ 11  Feb‐ 11  Mar‐ 11  Apr‐ 11  May‐ 11  Jun‐ 11  Jul‐ 11  Aug‐ 11  Sep‐ 11  Oct‐ 11  Nov‐ 11  Dec‐ 11  DIMENSIONS  Planned Value(PV)  10  50  114  210  344  520  740 980  1,236  1,504 1,788 2,000 Earned Value (EV)  8  45  110  200  310  490  610                Actual Cost (AC)  11  48  112  205  320  505  650                  Planned Value (PV) = 2,000  Earend Value (EV) = 610  Actual Cost (AC) = 650  EVA Data Date = July, 2011         
  21. 21. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      16      8.1 Calucuation of Variations:  a. Scheduel Variance (SV) = Earned Value ‐ Planned Value (AV ‐ PV)   b. Cost Variance (CV) = Earned Value ‐ Actual Cost (EV ‐ AC)     Earned Value Analysis (SV & CV) for Project ABC “As of July, 2011 – Table 2.2  DESCRIPTION  Formula  Jul‐11  VARIATIONS  Schedule Variance (SV)    =610‐740  ‐130  Cost Variance (CV)  =610‐650  ‐40      8.2    Calcualation of Varinces %:  a. Schedule Variance SV%  =  SV/PV  =  ‐130/740 = 18% Behind the Schedule.   b. Cost Variance CV%  =  CV/EV = ‐40/610 = 7% Overrun   The above table 2.2 shows a clear picture of the actual status of the work done and cost. Currently  shows the schedule variance of $‐130. It was sheduled to be completed $740 of work, and have only  completed for $610. In addition, the work that was completed for $610 has cost more than we had  planned $650, creating a cost variance of $‐40. It means project is running  “Behind the Schedule by  18%  & Over the Budget by 7%”.       
  22. 22. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      17      8.3  Calucuation of Index:  a. Scheduel Performance Index (SPI) = Earned Value/Planned Value (EV/ PV)  b. Cost Performance Index (CPI) = Earned Value/Actual Cost (EV/AC)     Earned Value Analysis (SPI & CPI) for Project ABC “As of July, 2011 – Table 2.3  DESCRIPTION  Formula  Jul‐11  INDEX  Schedule Performance Index (SPI)  =610/740  0.82  Cost Performance Index (CPI)  =610/650  0.94     The Above table 2.3 shows a clear index for actual wok done status based on time and cost. Currently  SPI  is 0.82. as it is less than 1.0 means the project is running “Behind the Schedule”. In addition, the  CPI is 0.94. as it is also less than 1.0 means the project running “Over the Budget”.    8.4  Calucuation of Forecast:  a. Estimate at Completion (EAC) =  AC + {(BAC ‐ EV)/(CPI*SPI)  b. Budget at Completion (BAC) = EAC * CPI  c. Estimate to Complete (ETC) = EAC – AC  d. Variance at Completion (VAC) = BAC – EAC  e. Total Complete Performance Index (TCPI) = (BAC‐EV) / (EAC ‐ AC)       
  23. 23. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      18      Earned Value Analysis (EAC, BAC, ETC, VAC & TCPI) for Project ABC “As of July, 2011) – Table 2.4  DESCRIPTION  Formula  Jul‐11  FORECAST  Estimate at Completion (EAC)  =650+(2000‐610)/(0.94*0.82)  2,447  Budget at Completion (BAC)  =2,447*0.94  2,296  Estimate to Complete (ETC)  =2,477‐650  1,797  Variance at Completion (VAC)  =2,296‐2,447  ‐151  Total Complete Performance Index (TCPI)  =(2,296/610)/(2,447‐650)  0.94    The above table 2.4 currently it shows the following:  a.  “Estimate at Completion”  shows $2,447, where as it was scheduled based on time and cost to  be completed the work for $2,000.   b. The “Budget at Completion” shows $2,296 where as it was budgeted based on time & cost to  be compelted the work for $2,000.   c. The “Estimate to Complete” shows as follows:  • Cost Based: $1,797 is the projected cost for future work to be executed.  • Time Based: (BAC/SPI)/(BAC/12) = 14.5 Months will be total project duration.  d. The “Variance at Completion” shows $‐151 as over budgeted at end of project.  e. The “Total Complete Performance Index” shows 0.94. as it is less than 1.0 this proejct will be  overbudget at end fo the project.  Based on the above calculations, Project ABC will be cost $2,447 & 14.5 Months to complete.   
  24. 24. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      19      9   EVA Graphical presentation for common scenarios as following:  9.1 EVA “ Unde Budget  & Behind Schedule”.   9.2 EVA “Over Budget & Behind Schedule”.  9.3 EVA “Under Budget & Ahead Schedule”.  9.4 EVA “Over Budget & Ahead Schedule”.    9.1 EVA “Under Budgt & Behind Schedule”.    Figure 2.1 – Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Under Budget & Behind Schedule)                $2,000 PV $1,800 AC $1,600 EV $1,400 EAC $1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 Jan‐12 Feb‐12 Mar‐12 Resources EXECUTED WORK PROJECTED WORK Duration in Months X Slipage Planned Vs Projected  Completion
  25. 25. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      20      9.2     EVA “Over Budget & Behind Schedule”.    Figure 2.2 – Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Over Budget & Behind Schedule)       9.3   EVA  “Under Budget & Ahead Schedule”.     Figure 2.3 – Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Under Budget & Ahead Schedule)  $2,500 PV $2,200 AC $2,000 EV $1,800 EAC $1,600 $1,400 $1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 ‐      Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 Jan‐12 Feb‐12 Mar‐12 Duration in Months Resources Completion Variation EXECUTED WORK PROJECTED WORK X Cost  Variation $2,000 PV $1,800 AC $1,600 EV $1,400 EAC $1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 EXECUTED WORK PROJECTED WORK Duration in Months X Cost  Variation
  26. 26. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      21         9.4   EVA “Over Budget & Ahead Schedule”.    Figure 2.4 – Cumulative Curves for PV, EV, AC & EAC. (Over Budget & Ahead Schedule)    Explaination:  In the above figures commonly represented the curves as follows:  • Green curve shown as Planned Value (PV) form the project start to finish dates  • Blue curve showsn as Actual Cost (AC) from the project start to data date end of July, 2011.  • Black cuve shown as Earned Value (EV) from the project start to data date end of july, 2011.  • Red Curve shown as Esimate at Completeion (EAC) future forecast from the data date to end of  project  • Figure 2.1:  Total cost of the project will be equal to BAC & Behind the Schedule & its variances.  • Figure 2.2:  Total cost of the project will be more than BAC & Behind the Schedule & its variances.  • Figure 2.3:  Total cost of the project will be equal to BAC & ahead the Schedule & its variances.  • Figure 2.4: Total cost of the project will be more than BAC & ahead the schedule & its variances.  ___________________________________________________________________________________  $2,500 PV $2,200 AC $2,000 EV $1,800 EAC $1,600 $1,400 $1,200 $1,000 $800 $600 $400 $200 $0 Jan‐11 Feb‐11 Mar‐11 Apr‐11 May‐11 Jun‐11 Jul‐11 Aug‐11 Sep‐11 Oct‐11 Nov‐11 Dec‐11 EXECUTED WORK PROJECTED WORK Resources Completion Variation Duration in Months X Cost  Variation
  27. 27. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      22      10. Conclusion:  The simple analysis methods described in the paper illustrate one beneficial use of earned value data,  evaluating the reasonableness of the contractors’s Estmate at Completeion.  EVA is a better mthod of  ptorgram/project  management  beacause  it  intigrates  cost  and  schedule,  can  be  used  to  forecast  future  performace  and  prject  compelteion  dates.  It  is  an  “early  warning”  program/project  management  tool  that  enables  managers  to  identifly  and  control  problems  before  they  become  insurmountable. It allwos projects to be amanged better on tme, on budtget.    The cost management report prepared from arned value data can provide project managers with  valuable insight into cost and scheduel status of their project. When used properly, the variances and  performances  indices  can  help  a  manager  focus  attention  on  merging  probleums.  The  cost  management reprot is not a financail reprot, it’s a tool for proejct managers.                   
  28. 28. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      23      11. Summary:  The Eearned Value Analysis is a management tool to measure the current performance of any project  in terms of “Cost & Schedule”.  And also it helps in forecasting the remaining work in terms of “Cost &  Schedule”.  EVA  is  a  usefull  tool  to  the  risk  management,  it  shows  the  current  variances  and  gives  “early  warning”  to  the  project  managers  for  the  future  risks  and  also  helps  in  taking  prompt  and  accurate decessions to execute the remaining the work “under the budget & behind the schedule” or  “On time & On Budget”. Its three key dimension are Planned Value, Earned Value & Actual Cost shows  current status of the project by comparing PV v/s  EV v/s AC. Hence EVA gives the right direction to  the project manageres to manage the project and meets the dealines in terms of “Cost & Schedule”.                        
  29. 29. Earned Value Analysis ‐ EVA      24       12. Bibliography / References  1. Department of Defense. “Earned Value Management Implementation” Guide Oct, 2006   Signed by “KEITH D. ERNST” Director Defense Contract Management Agency, by DoD USA      2. Practice standard for EARNED VALUE MANAGEMENT ISBN:1‐930699‐42‐5  Published by: PMI Inc. Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, Pennsylvania USA.  www.pmi.org    3. A Guide to the “Project Management Body of Knowledge” (PMBOK  Guide) 4th  Edition,   ISBN: 978‐1‐933890‐51‐7 Published by: PMI Inc. Fourteen Campus Boulevard, Newtown  Square, Pennsylvania USA.      4. PMstudy Targeting Success ‐Project Cost management Guide to Mathematical Question,   Published by: PMI Inc. www.pmstudy.com      5. Projectsmart.co.uk “ Earned Value Management Explained”   Date of visit (9th  Dec, 2011)       6. Earned Value Management, U.S.A Government NASA  Date of visit (9th  Dec, 2011)      7. “http://project‐management‐knowledge.com  Date of visit (20th  Dec, 2011)      8. “http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earned_value_management  Date of visit (25th  Dec, 2011)       

×