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Virtualization - the next trend in the automotive industry

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My last november talk for the E-OnTech#7 Berlin event about virtualization in Automotive ECUs.
Full talk on youtube: http://tiny.cc/5zllnz

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Virtualization - the next trend in the automotive industry

  1. 1. Virtualization The next trend in the automotive industry
  2. 2. About me ● A product owner in Opensynergy GmbH. ● 7+ years of experience in embedded software development and the automotive software domain. ● Enthusiastic about investing and financial markets. Ahmed Abdelfattah
  3. 3. Agenda ● Definitions ● Virtualization in the cloud ○ The concept of virtualization has been around much longer than you think ○ State of the art ● Moving to automotive ○ Traditional E/E architecture of the car ○ Limitations of the traditional architecture ○ The car of the future is software defined ● Borrowing the solution from the cloud ○ Architecture redesign ○ Challenges facing the modern architecture ○ COQOS Micro SDK
  4. 4. Definitions ● A Hypervisor is a software that enables running multiple guest OSes on the same physical hardware ● Each guest OS runs on a Virtual Machine
  5. 5. Virtualization in the Cloud
  6. 6. The Concept of Virtualization has been around much longer than you think ● In 1972, IBM released the first version of the VM OS family to run on the mainframe System/370. ● The VM/370 provided a virtual cpu, virtual storage, and virtual devices for each VM.
  7. 7. A snippet from “Introduction to VM/370 First Edition” published in 1972
  8. 8. State of the Art Source: http://www.brendangregg.com/blog/2017-11-29/aws-ec2-virtualization-2017.html AWS Nitro: Near-metal performance Azure Auto Scale: Scalability on demand https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-monitor/platform/autoscale-overview
  9. 9. Moving to Automotive ….
  10. 10. Traditional E/E Architecture of the Car ● One ECU (Electronic Control Unit) per feature. ● ECUs communicate over a slow bus (mostly CAN). ● Central Gateway ● The car manufacturer relies on many suppliers. Nolte, T., Hansson, H., & Bello, L. (2005). Automotive communications past, current and future. In Proceedings of 10th IEEE International Conference on Emerging Technologies and Factory Automation (ETFA’05) (pp. 985–992). IEEE Industrial Electronics Society.
  11. 11. Limitations of the Traditional Architecture ● Heavy weight up to 80 Kg ● Up to 5 Km of wiring harness length ● Increased software complexity puts the architecture under pressure ○ Autonomous driving ○ Electrification introduces new electronics ○ Mobility ○ Connectivity Sources: ● Zonal EE Architecture:Towards a Fully Automotive Ethernet–Based Vehicle Infrastructure Jochen Klaus-WagenbrennerSeptember 24, 2019 ● McKinsey & Company Analysis, IEEE "This Car Runs on Code"; HAWK; Automotive Electronics Initiative
  12. 12. The car or the future is software defined Source: Ronald Berger Strategy Consultants
  13. 13. The car or the future is software defined Source: https://informationisbeautiful.net/visualizat ions/million-lines-of-code/
  14. 14. Borrowing Solutions from the Cloud ...
  15. 15. Architecture Redesign Domain Architecture ● Consolidation of features into fewer powerful ECUs: Domain Controllers ● Ethernet backbone ● Reduces cost and weight P802.1DG – TSN Profile for Automotive In-Vehicle Ethernet Communications March 2019 Zinner, Brand, Hopf, Continental AG
  16. 16. Architecture Redesign Zonal Architecture ● Further consolidation of features ● Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) ● A step toward a fully centralized architecture ● Could bear savings of 50% or more to wiring harness length Source: Zonal EE Architecture:Towards a Fully Automotive Ethernet–Based Vehicle Infrastructure Jochen Klaus-WagenbrennerSeptember 24, 2019
  17. 17. Challenges facing the Modern Architectures ● Consolidation of software features into a single ECU complicates an already complicated development life cycle ○ could take up to 5 years for a single ECU production project ○ Most of time is spent to address safety requirements ● A major concern by OEMs is mixing software with different safety criticality levels (ASIL levels) ● Security is another major concern ● Suppliers adopt virtualization technology to addresses these concerns
  18. 18. COQOS Micro SDK: The real-time hypervisor ● The solution from OpenSynergy to address the challenges faced by OEMs. ● Runs on automotive microcontrollers. ● Very thin layer ● Provides memory protection and temporal isolation ● Ensures freedom from interference ● Highly static architecture to face security threats ● Hardware-assisted virtualization Source: OpenSynergy
  19. 19. Q&A

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