Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Visual Management: Leading with what you can see

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Loading in …3
×

Check these out next

1 of 70 Ad

Visual Management: Leading with what you can see

Download to read offline

Produced and presented by Craig Smith and Renee Troughton at the Agile Australia 2013 20 June.

Using task boards or story walls is a key Agile practice, but are you making the most of it? Visual Management is more than just putting cards on a wall, it is a growing style of management that focuses on managing work only by what you can see rather than reports or paper being shuffled around. Visual Management allows you to understand the constraints in the system, mitigate risks before they become issues, report on progress from the micro to the macro. Visual Management can also be used to demonstrate to customers and clients where the work they care about is at. This presentation is all about taking the management of your work to the next stage of transparency.

Discover:
How to identify when your story wall isn't telling you everything and how to adjust it
* What the three different types of story walls are and which one is more suitable to certain circumstances
* Different ways to visualise your product backlog
Why queue columns and limiting work in progress is so important regardless of whether you are using Scrum or Kanban
* How symbols and tokens can be used to give more information
* What else can you use other than story walls to visualise information
* How to ingrain Visual Management into both the team and management structures of your organisation
* Visualising Your Quality, Testing and Team
* What is systemic flow mapping and why is it important

Produced and presented by Craig Smith and Renee Troughton at the Agile Australia 2013 20 June.

Using task boards or story walls is a key Agile practice, but are you making the most of it? Visual Management is more than just putting cards on a wall, it is a growing style of management that focuses on managing work only by what you can see rather than reports or paper being shuffled around. Visual Management allows you to understand the constraints in the system, mitigate risks before they become issues, report on progress from the micro to the macro. Visual Management can also be used to demonstrate to customers and clients where the work they care about is at. This presentation is all about taking the management of your work to the next stage of transparency.

Discover:
How to identify when your story wall isn't telling you everything and how to adjust it
* What the three different types of story walls are and which one is more suitable to certain circumstances
* Different ways to visualise your product backlog
Why queue columns and limiting work in progress is so important regardless of whether you are using Scrum or Kanban
* How symbols and tokens can be used to give more information
* What else can you use other than story walls to visualise information
* How to ingrain Visual Management into both the team and management structures of your organisation
* Visualising Your Quality, Testing and Team
* What is systemic flow mapping and why is it important

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Viewers also liked (20)

Similar to Visual Management: Leading with what you can see (20)

Advertisement

More from Renee Troughton (18)

Recently uploaded (20)

Advertisement

Visual Management: Leading with what you can see

  1. 1. Craig Smith Renee Troughton
  2. 2. Welcome… Image: @ HBO – The Newsroom C
  3. 3. WARNING! Much of this may seem obvious Image: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-V6LkCqRzKsg/URgIsr021-I/AAAAAAAAAl0/xDTQYFNRo84/s1600/captain_obvious_by_stuartmcghee-d5mbxhw.jpgC
  4. 4. But… We see Crime Scene Walls every day! Image: © Jerry Bruckheimer Television http://images2.fanpop.com/image/photos/8600000/CSI-Las-Vegas-Episode-10-06-Promotional-Photos-csi-8615465-2000-1331.jpg R
  5. 5. …information is communicated by using visual signals instead of texts or other written instructions. The design is deliberate in allowing quick recognition of the information being communicated, in order to increase efficiency and clarity. What Is Visual Management? “ Image: © Charles M. Schulz / Universal UClick http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_FYLeQ4ABYTA/TP5pZEWX29I/AAAAAAAAH_Q/167AW75OrHE/s1600/a_charlie_brown_christmas_13.jpg http://www.thebestodds.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/hawks.jpg http://blog.toyota.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Kanban.jpg Everyday Visual Management C
  6. 6. Why It Is Important Effective retention 3 days after a meeting Spoken word only Visual + Oral Visual Hearing Smell Taste Touch Human Learning Retention C
  7. 7. Final Thoughts Flow Management Usability Complexity Thinking GamificationThe Zone Our flow today R
  8. 8. Visual Management: Flow Management Image: © Thunderbox Films http://qfxblog.files.wordpress.com/2011/11/kenny.jpgC
  9. 9. To Do Analysis Develop Test Done The Basic Flow Agile 101 tells us to build a wall like this C
  10. 10. Clear Instructions Development Done: • Code complete & reviewed • Unit Tests pass & complete • Acceptance Tests pass & complete • Checked in & build success • Documentation updated Instructions for adding a card Instructions for pushing a card to next queueR
  11. 11. Multi-Sprint Backlog Can see a little further down the road… C
  12. 12. Horizon & Queues Groom your backlog as you go Works well for Kanban (but iterative as well) Manage your work via WIP R
  13. 13. Story Map Backlog Map out features on a wall Map out the features and dependencies required C
  14. 14. Value Tree Backlog Single Feature, bottom up growthR
  15. 15. Multiple P/O Backlog Visualising the priorities for multiple product owners R
  16. 16. Timeline Board To Do Doing Done R
  17. 17. Lean Startup Board Repeat Build / Measure / Learn CC/R
  18. 18. Done By… Done by Cycle Time Done by Time C
  19. 19. vs Done Burn… versus Are we on track for end of iteration? C
  20. 20. Hourglass Limited WIP of 3 Tracks stories & tasks R
  21. 21. Scrum Hero Limited WIP of 8 As part of a larger zone R
  22. 22. To Do Doing Done! Representative size Balloon Board C
  23. 23. LEGO Portfolio Board DUPLO colour = Business domain DUPLO holes = Expected size (people) LEGO colour = Skill type Lower level = Number of people needed Upper level = Number of people allocated Divider height = control level for gate DUPLO height = Expected value/ROI R/C
  24. 24. Lego Portfolio ManagementLEGO Portfolio Board Why Are Doing This? Why Are Doing This? Idle People High Depend, High Risk Under Resource R
  25. 25. Back At Work? Build boards to visualise problems that you have Image: © Thunderbox Films http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Film/Pix/pictures/2007/09/27/kenny460.jpg Keep it simple, but visual Keep experimenting (or refine your awesomeness) C
  26. 26. Visual Management: The Zone Image: © Paramount Pictures http://www.sorrisi.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/School-of-rock.jpgC
  27. 27. Task Board Story Wall Kanban Board Which means work items should not be called tasks, user stories or kanbans… They are things on a wall. What’s In A Name? C
  28. 28. The Team The Customer Management What do I need to work on now? Where is my work at? Which teams need my support to remove blockers and waste? Who Cares About Transparency? R
  29. 29. Visual Management Zone Metrics People Environment Knowledge Artefacts Flow Zone What’s Makes up the Zone? RC
  30. 30. The Zone: Metrics 0 11 7 31 43.5 42 36.5 63 58.5 36.5 8 11 44 56 48 65 85 55 55 50 50 50 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 #01, 03-Dec#02, 21-Dec #03, 15-Jan #04, 25-Jan #05, 08-Feb #06, 22-Feb #07, 08- Mar #08, 22- Mar #09, 05-Apr #10, 19-Apr #11, 03- May #12, 17- May Scope (points) Cumulative Flow Diagram Burn Up Chart R
  31. 31. The Zone: Metrics Now Targeting Lobster Lunch Risk Heat Map R/C
  32. 32. The Zone: Metrics Code Climate Sonar C
  33. 33. The Zone: Metrics Qualitative & Quantitative Maturity Assessment C
  34. 34. The Zone: People Mood Chart Leave Calendars Capability / Dev Plan RR
  35. 35. The Zone: Environment Environment Status Build Status Client Mood C
  36. 36. The Zone: Knowledge Artefacts State Diagrams Database Diagrams R R
  37. 37. The Zone: Flow Zone Blackboard Whiteboard C
  38. 38. Back At Work? Seek forgiveness, rathe r than permission Image: © Paramount Pictures http://www.ruthlessreviews.com/wp-content/uploads/2006/03/schoolofrock.jpg Visual management isn’t just a flow board Your key artefacts should be visible in the zone R
  39. 39. Visual Management: Complexity Thinking Image: © Warner Bros. Pictures http://www.intellimusica.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Inception-Top-Wallpaper-Sohan-Surag.jpgC
  40. 40. No Visual Management? So What Flow To Use? Basic Flow? Process Flow? R
  41. 41. At Home La Marzocco • Predictable • No Expert Required Simple • Predictable • Expert Required Complicated • Unpredictable • Expert Required ComplexWorld Barista Championships Complex Coffee RR
  42. 42. At Home • Predictable • No Expert Required Simple Is Visual Management needed? Coffee At Home C
  43. 43. La Marzocco • Predictable • Expert Required Complicated Is Visual Management needed? To Do Doing Done Large Latte 2 sugars Macchiato 1 Sugar Flat White Large Latte 2 sugars Cappuccino 2 Sugars Expresso Coffee At A Coffee Shop Variability is Small R
  44. 44. To Do Doing Done Large Latte 2 sugars Macchiato 1 Sugar Flat White Large Latte 2 sugars Cappuccino 2 Sugars Expresso Coffee At A Coffee Shop Variability is Small R
  45. 45. Is Visual Management needed? To Do Doing Done Get tablecloth Order cups Test new roast (day 7) Test Kenyan Roast Test new roast (day 8) Test new roast (day 9) Diffuser delivery Waiting World Barista Championships • Unpredictable • Expert Required Complex Stop Championship Coffee Dependency Management Events Block Flow Significant Variability Extended Flow R
  46. 46. Systemic Flow Mapping Systemic Mapping (Organisation) Net Mapping (Stakeholders) Image: http://www.infoq.com/resource/articles/net-map/en/resources/NetMap-Example.jpg http://solutioneers.files.wordpress.com/2012/05/systemic-flow-mapping-early-synergystic.pngR/C
  47. 47. Back At Work? Choose the complexity of your work to determine the complexity of your board Image: © Warner Bros. Pictures http://filmjournal.net/100films/files/2010/08/2010_inception_014-1.jpg Some work may cross over complexity boundaries R
  48. 48. Visual Management: Usability Image: © 20th Century Fox http://www.ropewalksliverpool.com/images/made/uploads/images/6432-minorityreport_600_super_725_340_90_s_c1.jpgC
  49. 49. Visual Management: Usability Why do we care about usability for software? Why don’t we care about usability in visual management? Image: © 20th Century Fox http://www.tomcruise.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/04/tom-cruise-minority-report2.jpgC
  50. 50. Index Cards Have a low variability in sizes and shapes of cards RR
  51. 51. As a creator of user stories I want to use the right coloured pen So that it is quicker for the brain to read As a creator of user stories I want to use the right coloured pen So that it is quicker for the brain to read Colour Contrast Use a strong contrast of pen to index colour Use a pen that works! C
  52. 52. As a creator of user stories I want to write neatly So that it is quicker for the brain to read and recognise the work Asa creatorofuser stories Iwant towrite neatly Sothat it is quickerfor thebrainto readandrecognise thework Writing Style Write neatly or print cards. Size does matter! Although… Research shows hard to read fonts promote better recall. Go figure… R
  53. 53. Avatars Use real photos not characters or images Although, balance this with fun or team theme. Renee T Tokens to determine status R
  54. 54. As Craig I want my picture used for my persona So that it is quicker to recognise all the work for me In order for it to be quicker to recognise all the work for me As Craig I want my picture used for my persona User Story Templates Use pictures / graphics for personas Use bold / underline to emphasise quick searching Be consistent with layout and template Think different Put the value first Don’t write two words or the solution!C
  55. 55. Board Size Can you stand back and see the whole flow? Can you zoom in on an area of interest? Continuous Delivery is looking left and right! Avoid Water-Scrum- Fall C
  56. 56. Board Contrast Ensure that flow lines are not higher in contrast than the work items Have a strong contrast between the work items and the surface behind them Painters tape R
  57. 57. Board Relatedness Create relatedness of sections through colours Create relatedness of queues through shading Paint or Cardboard R
  58. 58. Back At Work? Think about design when initiating a team Find solutions that are quick but effective Image: © 20th Century Fox http://www.zuguide.com/images/10654/10654.0.570.359.jpg Good design == faster response == faster delivery C
  59. 59. Visual Management: GamificationC
  60. 60. Should work be fun? Image: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-BQOFvq6Glsk/TWUDjAesz0I/AAAAAAAAADM/cFJWykp8ADM/s1600/fun+at+work.jpgCC
  61. 61. Achievements Wall . . I don’t mind a good game of blackjack too All cards on the team’s flow board have estimates against them The only way is up! The Cumulative Flow Diagram has been consistently updated each day for four weeks RR
  62. 62. Gaming Development IDE Broken Build Messages Broken Build Hat Get Out… Free Cards C
  63. 63. Back At Work? Make work fun! Image: http://www.agent-x.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Pacman_on_twitter-0723634-218bc0c.jpg Choose your gaming to the environment and the people Intrinsic motivation trumps extrinsic driven goals R
  64. 64. Final Thoughts Image: http://www.laboratoriopop.com.br/imagensUpload/45189434231.jpg R
  65. 65. Is my wall telling me the whole story? Probably not! Start by mapping the flow Keep adjusting Image: http://ctparentingclass.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/lets-talk-post-it-notes-300x199.jpgC
  66. 66. Reinforce the zone Always go back to the zone for discussions about work Lead others by example and take all meetings or status updates to the wall Image: http://www.romanpichler.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/iStock_000014624446Medium.jpg R
  67. 67. But my team is distributed… Like distributed Agile, it takes more work! You need an electronic zone The default tool dashboards are average Image: http://ezylearn.com.au/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Lonely-office-man-003.jpgC
  68. 68. Spend your effort wisely… Image: © Bays & Thomas Productions http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-sLp9UDsboyU/TWExLggxICI/AAAAAAAAAp4/53_rS2PrzPM/s1600/Barney+Stinson+Quotes.jpg C
  69. 69. Our ultimate goal is to deliver value & good quality! Image: © Miller-Milkis Productions http://www.cointalk.com/attachments/194954d1344827742-fonzie_add.jpgC
  70. 70. agileforest.com renee@unbounddna.com @agilerenee craigsmith.id.au craig@unbounddna.com @smithcdau Craig Smith Renee Troughton unbounddna.com theagile revolution.com We are grateful to assistance from: @craigstrong leanpub.comAgileForest

Editor's Notes

  • Image: http://cdn.drstevegreene.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Traffic_light1.jpg
  • Q&A 5 minsIntro – 2 minsFlow Management – 8 minsThe Zone – 8 mins Usability – 5 minsComplexity thinking – 5 minsGamification – 3 minsOther – 4 mins
  • Moststorywalls look like this...
  • Which is really this
  • HorizonQueue columns - why
  • Feature Map one too?Craigs story map
  • A real example of a Value Tree at play. In this particular instance it is representing just a single feature. The bottom of the tree is the foundation and it needs to be worked on bottom up. Parallel processing or lack of time dependencies are the branches going out from the sides. The feature is shippable when the saw point is reached.
  • Employed in situations where a team has multiple Product Owners, a flow for managing and organising priority is critical. How do you go about this?New items (from anyone in the organisation) gets added to the new column. The card colour represents the type of work. Owners are designated for the types of work – if anyone wants their work to be made higher in priority they know who they need to appeal to. The type of work owners prioritise their own queue. Before the team’s stand-up there is a Product Owner Standup where collectively the Product Owners agree to what the next top 5 items are to be done. This means that the team doesn’t need to worry about competing priorities and that the risk of one person holding up priority across the whole organisation is also mitigated. It also has the additional benefit of a shared understanding across the Product Owners about what is occurring within the organisation and enables greater tolerance.
  • In some ways this is a Gantt chart wall, but length of task is not represented visually. When cards are done they are crossed off. The line represents “now”. Elements near the line are discussed if they are not done.
  • Normal done column
  • First will likely finish, second will not. Note that there is also more variability when things get “done” in the second example – this makes it more difficult to be able to accurately predict whether all the work will be finished by the end of the Sprint.
  • Winner ofThoughtworks Studio’s 2013 Best Card Wall, this visual management flow zone, created by @CraigStrongBacklog up the top, then task ready, task work in progress, task done and user story done. Note there is no distinction between ‘developer’ and ‘tester’ roles within this model. And Craig Strong’s actual board in play based on a four developers and 2/3 tester team. Note that because they had only three hourglass lanes it meant that the fourth developer was forced to help out where needed within the whole flow. This resulted in getting work done quicker and enabling knowledge sharing.
  • Another Craig Strong, this was a predecessor to the Hourglass board. Potentially a little less functional in implementation based on your team size (there is quite a bit of wall space waste in it), but this particular configuration allows for eight items to be in progress in the flow at any point in time. And it in action. Note the backlog to the left and it looks like deployment flow to the right (confirmation in progress atm).
  • Inspired by Rodrigo Yoshima’s work overflow demonstration where for each task you have on you blow up a balloon, this trades cards for balloons. There are two great upsides and one bad downside to this approach: you can use the size of the balloon to represent a element of the work – such as its value, you also have the added fun of being able to blow up the balloon when done. The downside is being able to attach them to a wall 
  • Kenny and Pawel never addressed the problem ofBig systems (>100+ systems)Services (eg networking, telephony, etc)Risk by resource visibilityHow much do big organisations spend on tooling?Why not spend it on Lego?Skill type example – red could be business analysts, blue are developers, white are quality assurance and yellow is infrastructure support. This doesn’t mean that t-shaped skills are not desirable. If you had well balanced teams then it would just be one colour.
  • What we can see here:Low value work is still on the boardDependencies can be visualised as a single line of workThe biggest set of work has the first project under resourced – this should be the most important focus of the organisation as the whole program provides the greatest value and has the highest risk. Idle people are displayed at the bottom, why aren’t they helping out in the top high value project in delivery. Overall there are too few Developers and Infrastructure people (compared to the levels of other roles)Easy to visually see weaknesses in resourcing – both incorrect allocations based on risk and in not enough people on deck. Easy to see risk areas by dependenciesEasy to see low value work that should be stopped
  • Visual Management zone is not just about a task board, in fact the terms “task board”, “story wall”, “kanban board” may be counter productive to vismgmt as work items may not be called tasks or user stories or cards… could be called ticketsIf you are going to call it anything – call it a Flow Board.Additional elements may include metrics, environmental availability, design elements eg state transition diagramsReally wonder whether it should be called “Visual Management System” of which the Flow Board is one element in the system.Leader: But what is in a Visual Management Zone?
  • But who is this transparency for?Where are “stakeholders” – they could be in any of these three areas.
  • Flow Status = the work the team is doingMetrics = the work, the people, the environmentPeople status = Niko-niko board or mood chart, capability plans, leave plans, rainbow slider (confidence)Environment status = status of the area where work is being done – eg traffic light environments, could be the latest health inspection resultsKnowledge artifacts = information that is important to be transparent – eg design thinking, statusWant to flash through a series of slides here of examplesLeader:Its all about transparency.
  • Stress charts, capability and development plan, leave calendars and important date events.
  • Client mood chart. Environment status chart (manually done vs automatec CRAIG).
  • Knowledge artifacts = information that is important to be transparent – eg design thinking, status
  • Or corflute or shower curtain card wall.
  • Let’s go through some Visual Management Heuristics associated with complexity thinking…
  • Leader: so what about our Complicated example?
  • Leader: So what about our complex example?
  • In a very literal sense this is what happens within a café.Here is Kelsey. Kelsey works at one of the busiest and most prestigous coffee brew bars in Brisbane – Dandelion and Driftwood.
  • Could also need to visualise dates, blockersNotice that the example has been limited to only one or two people involved. Do you think if a larger team was using Visual Management that it would impact their Cynefin category?
  • http://iancarroll.com/2012/04/30/systemic-flow-mapping/
  • Plug Matthew.As a community we are realising the benefit of good usability design. Visual Management is just an extention of this – lets ensure that the way in which we visualise our work is designed well.
  • To ease pattern recognition* The brain will automatically attempt to cluster shapes that are similar and intuit the rationale for the differences, even if there is none.Lip Service Contrast to good design
  • It is not just size but also consistency. The key lesson is, we probably all write user stories in haste, but there is value in ensuring you take the time to write neatly or re-write later when time is less imperative.
  • It is not just size but also consistency. The key lesson is, we probably all write user stories in haste, but there is value in ensuring you take the time to write neatly or re-write later when time is less imperitive. Size matters because the cards will be read at about a meter away, not 30cm (book reading distance).http://hbr.org/2012/03/hard-to-read-fonts-promote-better-recall/ar/1
  • We are hard wired to recognise faces. By using a photo over a symbolic image we are allowing for faster recognition of card ownership and potentially easier Daily Standups.But the difficulty here can be balancing this with “fun”. Self appointed avatars are fun, Coach afflicted photos can potentially not be.
  • We look for patterns.
  • Your eye is immediately drawn to the visual disparity of the blue line. As most system cards are light pastel in colour this means that blue painters tape isn’t ideal. Join the bandwagon for better Visual Management tape other than what is available at hardware stores.
  • Colour can also create relatedness just as proximity does.Passive vs active zones - In this example, the shading/colour creates hot zones for the eye so that will create a specific visual flow (shading spots first then other colours) that is counterintuitive to the visual hierarchy (left to right).
  • Balance time spent vs value delived – you can waste a lot of time on this for not much gain
  • Don’t forget, we are here to deliver valuable outcomes
  • Image: http://cdn.drstevegreene.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Traffic_light1.jpg

×