BLS and CPR

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BLS and CPR

  1. 1. Basic Life Support/ Cardio Pulmonary Resuscitation
  2. 2. • Many infants and children are thought to develop respiratory arrest and bradycardia before they develop cardiac arrest. • If such children receive prompt CPR before development of cardiac arrest, they will have high survival rate.
  3. 3. For Infants
  4. 4. 1 rescuer infant BLS sequence Check the infant for response and breathing. Shout for help if no response, no breathing or only gasping. If someone responds ask to activate emergency response and get AED Check the infant's brachial pulse. (take 5 but not more than 10s) If there is no pulse or if despite adequate oxygenation and ventilation HR <60/min with poor signs of perfusion Perform cycles of compression and breaths (30:2), starting with compressions. After 5 cycles, if not done, activate the emergency response system and get the AED.
  5. 5. 2 finger chest compression technique Place the infant on a firm, flat surface. Place 2 fingers in the infant’s chest just below the nipple line.(do not press the bottom of the breastbone) Push hard push fast: to give chest compressions, press the infants breastbone down at least one third of the depth of chest i.e. approx. 11/2 inches(4cm). Deliver compressions in a smooth fashion at a rate of about 100/min. Allow complete chest recoil after each compression. Chest recoil allows blood to flow into the heart and is necessary to create blood flow during chest compressions. Incomplete chest recoil will reduce the blood flow created by chest compressions. Approximately chest compression and chest recoil/relaxation time should be equal and minimize interruptions in compressions.
  6. 6. Infant ventilation with barrier devices • Select a bag and a mask of appropriate size. • Mask must be able to cover victim’s mouth and nose without covering the eyes or overlapping the chin. • Perform a head tilt – chin lift to open victim’s airway. • Press the mask to infant's face as you lift the infant's jaw making a seal between infant’s face and mask. • Connect supplementary oxygen to the mask when available.
  7. 7. Why breaths are important for infants and children in cardiac arrest • Cardiac arrest in an adult- oxygen content of blood is typically normal, thus compressions alone may maintain the oxygen delivery to the heart and brain for first few seconds after arrest • Cardiac arrest in infants and children- causes respiratory failure or shock that reduces the oxygen content in the blood even before the onset of arrest. Thus chest compressions alone are not effective as the combination of compression plus breaths during CPR.
  8. 8. 2 rescuer infant CPR Place both thumbs side by side in the center of infant’s chest on the lower half of the breast bone. Thumbs may overlap in very small infants. Encircle the infants chest and support the infants chest with fingers of both hands. With your hands encircling the chest, use both hands to depress the breastbone at least one third of the depth of chest i.e. approx. 11/2 inches(4cm). Deliver compressions in a smooth fashion at a rate of about 100/min. Allow complete chest recoil after each compression by completely releasing the pressure on the breast bone. After every 15 compressions, pause briefly for the 2nd rescuer to open the airway with a head tilt chin lift and give 2 breaths. The chest should rise with each breath. Continue compression and breaths in a ratio of 15:2 switching roles every 2 min. to avoid rescuer fatigue.
  9. 9. 2 rescuer infant BLS sequence Check the child for a response and check breathing. if there is no response and no breathing or only gasping, 2nd rescuer activates the emergency response system and get AED. Check the infant's brachial pulse (take at least 5sec but not more than 10sec.) If there is no pulse or if despite adequate oxygenation and ventilation HR <60/min with poor signs of perfusion perform cycles of chest compression and breaths (30:2). When the 2nd rescuer comes, use a compression to breath ratio of 15:2. Use the AED or defibrillator as soon as it is available.
  10. 10. Video
  11. 11. For children from 1year of age to Puberty
  12. 12. 1 rescuer child BLS sequence Check child for response and breathing. Shout for help if no response If someone responds ask to activate emergency response and get AED Check the child's pulse. Try to feel child’s carotid or femoral pulse. If within 10sec you don't feel a pulse or if despite adequate oxygenation and ventilation HR <60/min with poor signs of perfusion Perform cycles of chest compression and breaths (30:2), starting with compressions. After 5 cycles, if not done, activate the emergency response system and get the AED.
  13. 13. 2 rescuer child BLS sequence Check the child for a response and check breathing; if there is no breathing or only gasping, 2nd rescuer activates the emergency response system. Check the child's pulse (take at least 5sec but not more than 10sec.you may try to feel the child's carotid or femoral pulse. If within 10sec you don't feel a pulse or if despite adequate oxygenation and ventilation HR <60/min with poor signs of perfusion perform cycles of chest compression and breaths (30:2). When the 2nd rescuer comes, use a compression to breath ratio of 15:2.
  14. 14. Child ventilation with barrier devices • Select a bag and a mask of appropriate size • Mask must be able to cover victim’s mouth and nose without covering the eyes or overlapping the chin • Perform a head tilt – chin lift to open victim’s airway • Press the mask to child's face as you lift the child's jaw making a seal between child’s face and mask • Connect supplementary oxygen to the mask when available
  15. 15. High quality CPR improves chances of victim’s survival- Start compression within 10 sec of recognition of cardiac arrest Push hard push fast: Compress at a rate of at least 100/min with depth of approx. 2inches for children and 11/2 inches for infants Allow complete chest recoil after each compression Minimize interruptions in compressions Give effective breaths that make chest rise. [avoid excessive ventilation]
  16. 16. Video

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