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The state and future of Botswana Optic Fibre Networks/Tlhako Sekopo

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Botswana 30-31 Oct 2017

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The state and future of Botswana Optic Fibre Networks/Tlhako Sekopo

  1. 1. OPEN DATA OPEN SCIENCE CONFERENCE TOPIC: The state and future of Botswana Optic Fibre Networks Tlhako Sekopo Technology Planning Manager BoFiNet
  2. 2. 1. INTRODUCTION – A CASE FOR FIBRE OPTICS 2. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE 1. THE STATE OF OPTIC FIBRE NETWORKS INFRASTRUCTURE 2. INTERNATIONAL / NATIONAL AND LOCAL ACCESS NETWORKS 3. OPTIC FIBRE INFRASTRUCTURE EVOLUTION – FUTURE PLANS 4. OPPORTUNITIES FOR BROADBAND ACCESS INFRASTRUCTURE IN BOTSWANA TABLE OF CONTENTS
  3. 3. INTRODUCTION – A CASE FOR FIBRE OPTICS  Fibre optic as a transmission medium  Cables are capable of transmitting large amount of data at phenomenal data rates due to their material properties and characteristics.  Air – propagation and spectrum constraints  Copper cables - (twister or coaxial) attenuation and interference  Optic Fibre therefore has found various application scenarios for high data rate transmissions
  4. 4. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – CONNECTIVITY IMPERATIVES Transforming our world: the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development  Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation  9.1 Develop quality, reliable, sustainable and resilient infrastructure, including regional and transborder infrastructure, to support economic development and human well-being, with a focus on affordable and equitable access for all.  9.a Facilitate sustainable and resilient infrastructure development in developing countries through enhanced financial, technological and technical support to African countries, least developed countries, landlocked developing countries and small island developing States  9.c Significantly increase access to information and communications technology and strive to provide universal and affordable access to the Internet in least developed countries by 2020
  5. 5. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT - ICT BENEFITS TO THE ECONOMY 5
  6. 6. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT - ICT BENEFITS TO THE ECONOMY 1. Exchange of information made easier, secure, better governance and accountability.  Facilitates decentralization for sparsely populated country.  Adoption of electronic commerce reduces cost of doing business. 2. Enhances efficiencies in doing business;  Mobile financial services leading to financial inclusion of previously unbanked persons.  Distance learning enhanced(eliminates annual purchase of text books, 24/7 learning etc). 3. e-Gov improves welfare of people and makes public service more efficient. Demand for video overwhelming for networks 6
  7. 7. Telecom Competition Gov’t Info On-Line School Connectivity Community Connectivity Teacher Training Health Information On-Line Governance Structure e-Government Portal Technology Blueprint SchoolNet Design & Pilot Community Access Design Legislative Amendments Healthcare Portal Promotion & Awareness Increased levels of investment Job creation Business Modernization Life-long Learning Flourishing ICT Sector Innovative, entrepreneurial society Broadband connectivity Increased levels of e-Commerce Increased levels of e-Business Telehealth and Telemedicine Government Modernization ICT Sector Growth Introduce Tax & Fiscal Incentives Gov’t services on-line e-Procurement SME Training ICT Adult Training Programme ICT education - as tool and content Project Champion Task Forces Broad Engagement E-Readiness Benchmarking Legislative Framework National Policy Roll-Out Knowledge Based Society Getting Started Global Information Society Future State Fast-Track Accelerating Take – Up Gaining Momentum ICT – Driven Innovation 2022 2007 BOTSWANA ICT HIGHWAY © BoFiNet 7
  8. 8. CONNECTIVITY PLANS- DRAFT NATIONAL BROADBAND STRATEGY TARGETS 8 Minimum Target Access Speed (Mbps) 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 2017-2018 2018-2019 2019- 2020 2020- 2022 Urban & Major Areas 2MBPS 4MBPS 5MBPS 10MBPS 50MBPS 100MBPS 100MBPS Rural Areas 512KB 1MBPS 2MBPS 5MBPS 30MBPS 30MBPS 50MBPS Agricultural Areas 512KB 1MBPS 5MBPS 5MBPS 10MBPS
  9. 9. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE Submarine Cable Networks Regional Networks National Backbone Networks Access Networks
  10. 10. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE (submarine cable networks)  Africa has to be connected to the world.  Cost of connecting to the world has to be managed through competing solutions / infrastructure.  Many investments made so far, the latest being Angola to Brazil to USA
  11. 11. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE (BoFiNet Submarine Investments)
  12. 12. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE (Regional Fibre Connectivity) We have exit capacities at the following borders, interconnecting with various partner operators:  South Africa • Ramatlabama • Tlokweng  Zimbabwe • Ramokgwebana  Zambia • Kazungula • Ngoma-Katima-Sesheke  Namibia • Charles Hill • Ngoma • All at multiples of 10G(STM64), & scalable to 100G interfaces Ramokgwebana ORAPA Sehithwa Teracco Serule Kazungula GANTSI CHARLES HILL Tlokweng REP 4E Thamaga Shoshong Rep 4 REP 2 Mmashoro Letlhakane Site 127 Panda Site 243 Ngoma Dukwi Math Site 43 Motopi Mabuts Shakawe Mohembo MOIJ Existing Lobatse JWANENG SEKOMA Morw KANG Rakops Kumaga Masun Sibina Zwens Nyangagwe Tati Tonota Tshese Dume Machan Sefare LeralaGota Mauna Sefophe Tsetse bjwe Maphara Letlhaken Takatok Serowe Hill Thabalal Ongoing Two Rivers Borkspits Gudigwa Planned Hukuntsi Motokwe Kaudwane MABULE Maitengwe LEGEND RAMATLABAMA
  13. 13. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE (National Fibre Backbone Network) BoFiNet has recently invested heavily in the national backbone infrastructure development since 2014. The fibre network coverage to date is as follows:  Over 8000km fibre cable deployed.  Mainly DWDM equipment used, offering 40 wavelengths of 10Gb each capacity  152 localities connected to fibre network.  Latest areas covered are;  Sekoma–Tsabong–2 Rivers  Sehitwa–Shakawe–Gudigwa  Maun–Kachikau-Paragarungu-Ngoma  Sefophe–Bobonong–Mathathane Legend Existing Fibre Network Ongoing Fibre Network Planned Fibre Network PHITSHANE MOLOPO MABULE NCOJANE TSETSENG MOTOKWE SHAKAWE GUDINGWA TWO RIVERS KAUDWANE NATA MOTOPI MAUN HUKUNTSI MATHATHANE
  14. 14. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – NETWORK ARCHITECTURE (Access Network Infrastructure) BoFiNet has implemented a variety of technologies to deliver broadband access for its customers. 38 localities with a population of 5,000 targeted by end of NDP11  Fixed broadband delivery – FTTx (Fibre to The X – [Business/Cabinet/Home etc])  The current target for broadband deliveries are for;  Public and private education facilities  Public and private health facilities  Industrial and commercial centres  Hospitality facilities  Government offices  Fixed broadband access delivery –  Wireless by PtMP radio  Wi-Fi (Botswana Hotspots – 31 public areas covered): www.GOV.BW IS FREE
  15. 15. OPTIC FIBRE DEPLOYMENT – FTTx deployment  FTTx deployment stared with four localities;  Gaborone, Francistown, Maun & Kasane  Recent additions are;  Tsabong, Lobatse, Mogoditshane, Serowe, Palapye, S/Phikwe & Bobonong  2017/2018 target is to do 2091 fibre cable connections  Next planned areas;  See next slide… Item Location No. of Lit Premises 1 Gaborone 776 2 Franc istow n 207 3 M aun 101 4 Kasane 82 5 Lobatse 72 6 M ogoditshane 69 7 Serow e 109 8 Palapye 85 9 S/ Phikw e 100 10 Bobonong 58 11 Tsabong 58 1717Total
  16. 16. 16 OPTIC FIBRE INFRASTRUCTURE – FUTURE PLANS FTTB AND WIRELESS BROADBAND ACCESS BUDGET REQUIREMENTS –NDP 11 No Town 2017/18 2018/19 2019/20 2020/21 2021/22 1 Gaborone √ √ - - 2 Fibre to the Cabinet 3 Francistown - - - - - 4 Maun - - - - - 5 Kasane - - - - - 6 Selebi-Phikwe - - - - - 7 Lobatse - - - - - 8 Jwaneng - √ - - - 9 Tsabong - - - - - 10 Mogoditshane - - - - - 11 Tlokweng √ - - - - 12 Molepolole - √ - - 13 Serowe - - - - - 14 Ghanzi - - - - - 15 Kanye - - √ - - 16 Mahalapye - - √ - 17 Palapye - - - - - 18 Orapa & Letlhakane √ - - - 19 Mochudi - - - - 20 Gabane - - - - - 21 Kang - - - - - 22 Ramotswa & Taung - - √ - 23 Moshupa - - √ 24 Thamaga - - - √ 25 Bobonong - - - - - 26 Metsimotlhabe - - - √ 27 Mmopane - √ - 28 Tutume - - - √ - 29 Tonota - - - - √ 30 Mmadinare - - - - √ 31 Tatisiding - - - √ 32 Bokaa - - - √ 33 Oodi - - - - √ 34 Goodhope - - - - √ 35 Borolong - - - √ 36 Gumare - - - - √ 37 Shakawe - - - - √ 38 Masunga - - - - √ 39 Sowa Town - - - - √ 40 Rural underserved villages - √ - - 41 Agricultural areas - √ √ -
  17. 17. INFRASTRUCTURE SUMMARY 17 Cross-border fibre network links and national hubs Local loops and last mile linksInternational Links (Submarine and terrestrial networks) Internet Content sourced predominately outside Infrastructure Segments
  18. 18. OPTIC FIBRE INFRASTRUCTURE – FUTURE PLANS (Backbone fibre, WTTx&WDLS, FTTB, FTTC AND FTTH) We must expected to see continued developments of fibre deployments, not just by BoFiNet, but by other operators.  BoFiNet will continue with FTTBusiness rollout.  Fibre rollout for mobile backhaul to continue (facilitate 4G rollout).  Fibre rollout to facilitate home broadband access to be the next big thing.  Fibre deployments to remote and rural communities to continue, with Wireless networks for local access.  Investigation on the use of TV spectrum (TVWS) ongoing – BoFiNet collaborating with BITRI, tapping from Fibre nodes.  Preparations for the deployment of 5G backhaul.
  19. 19. OPPORTUNITIES FOR BROADBAND ACCESS INFRASTRUCTURE IN BOTSWANA (Key Trends For Access and FTTH Delivery) The following trends reflect worldwide broadband delivery;  Volume of data transmission keeps growing, led by video applications  Subscribers have access to ever more attractive pricing through competition between incumbents and new entrants  Investment in improved infrastructure necessary to deliver services that attract and retain customers  Fibre installed more deeply, in high fibre count, either to the home or to the cabinet 170,000 fixed phone lines and only 33,000 have ADSL broadband service  Broadband delivery facilitating Internet of Things (Smart homes and smart offices)
  20. 20. BROADBAND ACCESS DEPLOYMENT – IMPACT (Internet uptake)  Internet capacity sold to retailors jumped from 2.187 Gbps in 2014 to 20.32 Gbps in 2017  This uptake can be attributed to;  Reduced wholesale prices by BoFiNet.  High speed access connections to customers  Data rich video applications and user generated content delivery a more compelling product (Netflix, YouTube &Video calling)  Prices of smart devices and subscription packages continue to decline, increasing availability to masses 2.067 3.5 5.67 5.73 5.55 0.12 2.43 3.3 8.3 9.0 0 0.363 0.102 0 00 1.42 2.32 5.26 5.77 2.187 7.713 11.388 19.290 20.320 0 5 10 15 20 25 2014 2015 2016 2017-August 2017-September UTILIZATION(GBPS) YEAR IPT August 2017 (Gbps) LONDON RSA Djibouti Local Content (Akamai + Google) TOTAL
  21. 21. BROADBAND ACCESS DEPLOYMENT – IMPACT (Internet Content) © BoFiNet 21 Android Market 2% Asymmetric 13% BitTorrent 4% Facebook 23% HTTP 5%HTTP download 5% HTTP Media Stream 6% HTTP2 5% Others 2% SSL v3 9% uTP 6% WhatsSpp 5% Windows Update 5% Youtube 11% INTERNET SERVICES THROUGH BOFINET: 2017 Android Market Asymmetric BitTorrent Facebook HTTP HTTP download HTTP Media Stream HTTP2 Others SSL v3 uTP WhatsSpp Windows Update Youtube 420 TiB Content distribution;  Facebook accounts for 23% of internet traffic through BOFINET,  YouTube accounts for 11%  These are both video intensive platforms.

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