Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Aging Brain 2015

723 views

Published on

From International Life Sciences Institute discussion organized by ILSI Europe: "The Aging Brain" by Dr. S. Kergoat, 19 ~ 20 January 2015 in Chandler, Phoenix, Arizona

Published in: Food
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

The Aging Brain 2015

  1. 1. THE  AGEING  BRAIN   20  January  2015,  17.00  -­‐  18.30   Dr.  S.  Kergoat   2015  ILSI  Annual  Mee7ng   19-­‐20  January,  2015   Chandler,  Phoenix,  Arizona  
  2. 2. Presenta?on  overview   •  Introduc7on:  Nutri7on  and  Mental  Performance  Task  Force   •  Ageing  popula7on  focus   •  Workshop  report:  Nutri7on  for  the  ageing  brain  -­‐  towards   evidence  for  an  opAmal  diet  
  3. 3. Nutri?on  and  Mental  Performance   Background  and  Objec?ves   The  rela7onship  between  nutri7on  and  mental  performance  has  grown  substan7ally  in   recent  years.   •  In  this  developing  field,  the  Nutri7on  and  Mental  Performance  Task  Force  works   –  to  advance  and  disseminate  scien7fic  knowledge  on  the  effects  of  diet  and  food   components  on  mental  performance,     –  to  increase  awareness  of  the  importance  of  nutri7on  for  brain  func7ons  across   the  lifespan.   Impact     •  The  task  force  has  produced  elemental  guidance  for  research  in  the  field.   Nutri?on  and  Mental  Performance  Expert  Groups   •  REVIEW:  Measuring  and  Valida7ng  the  Subjec7ve  Effects  of  Food  on  Mood  and   Mental  Performance.   •  WORKSHOP:  'Nutri7on  for  the  Ageing  Brain:  Toward  Evidence  for  an  Op7mal  Diet',   3-­‐4  July  2014,  Milan  (IT).  
  4. 4. Ageing  popula?on  
  5. 5. <15   15-­‐59   60+   <15   15-­‐59   60+   <15   15-­‐59   60+   The  ageing  popula?on:  The  percentage  of  aged  populaAons  (60+)  will   skyrocket  in  almost  every  country  in  the  next  few  decades.     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     8                        6                      4                      2                        0                      2                      4                        6                      8     100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4   100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4   100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4  100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4   100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4   100+   95-­‐99   90-­‐94   85-­‐89   80-­‐84   75-­‐79   70-­‐74   65-­‐69   60-­‐64   55-­‐59   50-­‐54   45-­‐49   40-­‐44   35-­‐39   30-­‐34   25-­‐29   20-­‐24   15-­‐19   10-­‐14   5-­‐9   0-­‐4   <15   15-­‐59   60+   <15   15-­‐59   60+   <15   15-­‐59   60+   1970   1970   2010   2010   2050   2050   Less  developed  regions   More  developed  regions   Males   Females  
  6. 6. Source:  WHO,  2012   Percentage  aged  60  years  or  over   0-­‐9   10-­‐19   20-­‐24   25-­‐29   30  or  over   No  data   The  ageing  popula?on:  percentage  of  aged  populaAons  (60+)  in  2012  
  7. 7. Source:  WHO,  2012   Percentage  aged  60  years  or  over   0-­‐9   10-­‐19   20-­‐24   25-­‐29   30  or  over   No  data   The  ageing  popula?on:  percentage  of  aged  populaAons  (60+)  in  2050  
  8. 8. Growing  number  of  people  with  demen?a   Source:  WHO,  2012  
  9. 9. Publica?ons  containing  the  term  “cogni?ve  decline”  AND   “diet”  OR  “nutri?on”   0   10   20   30   40   50   60   70   80   90   100   1992   1993   1994   1995   1996   1997   1998   1999   2000   2001   2002   2003   2004   2005   2006   2007   2008   2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   2014   Number  of  publica?ons   Year   Source:  Scopus  –  extracted  December  2014  
  10. 10. Nutri?on  and  the  ageing  brain   “It  is  becoming  widely   accepted  that  lifestyle   changes  are  the  best   protec7on  against   demen7a,  crea7ng  a   massive  opportunity  for   nutri7onal  products”.   Keith  Wesnes,  Northumbria   University  Lexical  cluster  analysis   Terms:  cogniAve+decline+diet   Database:  PubMed  
  11. 11. •  Currently  there  are  no  preventa7ve  dietary  recommenda7ons  for   preserving  brain  health  and  cogni7on  by  any  major  health   organisa7ons.   •  Regulatory  agencies  have  not  given  any  posi7ve  opinions  for   nutrients  that  help  maintain  brain  func7on  during  ageing.   •  At  the  same  7me,  there  exists  a  wealth  of  disparate  data  rela7ng  to   how  nutrients,  food  components  and  whole  diets  impact  cogni7ve   ageing.   Diet  and  brain  health  
  12. 12. The  task  force  has  embarked  on  a  project  to  review  the  evidence   suppor7ng  how  nutrients,  food  and  diet  influence  brain  health.       Ac?vity   A  workshop  was  organised  to  define  the  mechanisms  and   7meframes  of  brain  ageing  and  iden7fy  when  neuroprotec7on   via  nutri7on  can  begin.      
  13. 13. Workshop  report  
  14. 14. Workshop  objec?ves   •  Iden7fy  evidence  of  an  effect  of  diet  or  specific  sets  of  nutrients  or  dietary   factors  on  cogni7ve  ageing.   •  Iden7fy  ways  of  promo7ng  healthy  cogni7ve  ageing.   –  If  there  is  significant  evidence,  what  are  the  effects  of  nutrients  or   dietary  factors  on  cogni7on?   –  How  do  individual  and  environmental  differences  or  other  dietary   components  play  a  role  in  the  effects  that  these  nutrients  exert?   –  Are  there  age-­‐specific  dietary  requirements?   Five  sessions  were  addressed  during  this  event:  
  15. 15. Session  1:  Introduc?on  and  background   •  Welcome,  introduc7on  and  objec7ves  of  the  workshop   Prof.  Diána  Báná7   •  Understanding  normal  and  pathological  declines  in  cogni7ve  func7on  and  how  they  can  be  influenced  by   gene7c  and  dietary  factors   Prof.  Keith  Wesnes   Session  2:  Mechanisms  of  ageing  and  neuroprotec?on  via  nutrients   •  Oxida7ve  stress   Dr  Anne-­‐Marie  Roussel   •  Neuro  inflamma7on  (microglia  and  astrocytes,  inflammageing)   Dr  Hugh  Perry   •  An7amyloidogenic  (APP  processing,  tau  phosphoryla7on)   Prof.  Robert  Williams   •  Neurodegenera7on  and  synap7c  dysfunc7on/loss   Dr  Laura  Caberlomo   •  Biomarkers  of  cogni7ve  status   Dr  Robert  Perneczky   Session  3:  Can  a  healthy  brain  be  maintained  an  a  basic  balanced  diet  -­‐  what  is  the  role  of  individual  varia?on?   •  Diets  (including  mediterranean)  vs.  Superfoods  (e.g.  Func7onal)  vs.  Supplementa7on   Dr  Cris7na  Andres-­‐Lacueva   •  Interven7on  trials   Dr  Ondine  van  de  Rest   •  Molecular  mechanisms  underlying  dietary  modula7on  of  adult  hippocampal  neurogenesis:  implica7ons   for  mental  health   Dr  Sandrine  Thuret   •  Ketogenic  diets   Dr  Robin  Williams   •  Lifestyles  factors  (e.g.  Nutri7on,  exercise,  stress)  for  preserva7on  of  cogni7on:  what  is  the  poten7al  role   of  nutri7on;  can  exercise  enhance  micronutrient  effects?   Prof.  Eef  Hogervorst   •  Role  of  obesity/diabetes/impaired  glucose  tolerance/metabolic  disease  in  brain  ageing,  including   metabolic  factors   Prof.  Anne-­‐Marie  Minihane  
  16. 16. Session  4:  methodological  challenges  —  finding  solu?ons   •  Transla7on  of  animal  results:  mechanis7c  findings,  models  and  caveats   Prof.  Jeremy  Spencer   •  Effects  of  diets  on  cerebral  blood  flow  and  structure  and  func7on  (fmri,  bold,  ASL,  DTI)   Dr.  Amanda  Kiliaan   •  Nutri7on  and  the  brain  ageing:  what  epidemiology  tells  us?   Dr.  Pascale  Barberger-­‐ Gateau   •  Why  randomised  trials  in  humans  should  be  the  gold  standard  for  data  on  nutrients  and  ageing?   Dr.  Robert  Clarke   •  Biomarkers  of  nutri7on  status   Dr.  Claudine  Manach   Closing  session   •  Specific  nutrient  intake  levels  and  cogni7ve  ability:  are  there  op7mal  levels  for  preserving   cogni7on?   Dr  Gene  Bowman   Session  5:  discussion  and  debate?   •  Key  issues  and  knowledge  gaps   •  Wrap-­‐up  and  closing  remarks  
  17. 17. Ques?ons  addressed  in  the  workshop   •  To  what  extent  are  RDIs  useful  in  providing  guidance  for  op7mal  nutrient   intake  for  cogni7ve  aging?   •  If  the  RDIs  are  inadequate,  how  could  we  derive  bemer   recommenda7ons?   •  What  impact  should  our  knowledge  of  the  effect  of  age  related  nutrient   uptake  (intes7ne  and  brain),  nutrient  metabolism  and  nutrient  u7liza7on   on  cogni7ve  aging  have  on  nutrient  intake  guidelines?   •  Is  there  a  scien7fic  basis  to  develop  age-­‐specific  nutrient  needs  for  brain   health?  
  18. 18. •  Does  genotype  and  inter-­‐individual  variability  represent  a  barrier  for   dietary  supplementa7on?   •  Do  food  bioac7ves  act  synergis7cally  when  combined?   •  Does  the  current  research  allow  us  to  translate  to  human  interven7ons   under  clinical  condi7ons?   •  What  are  the  main  knowledge  gaps  regarding  nutrient  needs  for  cogni7ve   aging,  and  how  does  this  translate  into  research  recommenda7ons?  
  19. 19. Workshop  conclusions  
  20. 20. Output   •  The  key  recommenda7ons  for  cogni7ve  maintenance  are  avoiding  health   condi7ons  like  obesity,  anaemia,  diabetes  and  heart  disease  in  midlife.  These   contribute  to  faster  brain  ageing  and  increased  risk  of  demen7a.     •  Addi7onally,  nutri7on  recommenda7ons  of  many  countries  are  reflec7ve  of   peripheral  needs.  They  may  not  be  enough  for  the  high  energy  and  specific   nutrient  demands  of  the  brain  (e.g.  increased  levels  of  glucose,  DHA,  Vitamin   C,  etc).     •  Therefore,  it  is  important  to  understand  which  nutrients  need  to  be   supplemented  during  ageing  when  the  efficiency  of  nutrient  absorp7on   decreases.    
  21. 21. •  There  is  huge  and  convincing  epidemiological  evidence  that  special  diets   (high  polyphenol  and  nutrients  rich/low  calories)  and  intake  of  certain   nutrients  (vitamins  B  and  D,  and  an7oxidants)  have  the  ability  to  amenuate   the  rate  of  cogni7ve  decline.   •  Research  needs  to  iden7fy  which  individuals  will  benefit  from  specific   nutrients  (some  may  be  able  to  do  with  less  or  some  have  special  need  for   more).   •  These  individual  differences  in  nutrient  needs  may  also  make  some  more   likely  to  develop  health  issues  that  contribute  to  brain  ageing  like   hyperhomocysteinemia  or  high  blood  pressure.  
  22. 22. •  There  are  massive  opportuni7es  for  nutri7onal  products  and  op7mal  diets   but  these  need  to  be  translated  in  clear  preven7ve  guidelines  to  maintain   cogni7ve  func7on  during  ageing.     •  The  workshop  also  iden7fied  the  mismatch  of  epidemiology  and   randomised  clinical  trials  as  a  key  knowledge  gap.     Next  steps     •  The  proceedings  of  the  workshop  is  currently  summarised  into  a  peer-­‐ reviewed  ar7cle.    
  23. 23. Acknowledgements     Dr  David  Vauzour  (chair)  University  of  East  Anglia  (UK)   Dr  Siobhan  Mitchell  (co-­‐chair)  Nestlé  (CH)     Dr  Pascale  Barberger-­‐Gateau  INSERM  (FR)   Dr  Sophie  Kergoat  Wrigley  (Mars  Inc.)  (US)   Prof.  Ugo  Lucca  Mario  Negri  Ins7tute  Pharmacology  Research  (IT)   Dr  Lionel  Noah  Sanofi-­‐Aven7s  R&D  (FR)   Dr  María  Ramírez  Abbom  Nutri7on  (ES)   Dr  John  Sijben  Danone  (NL)   Prof.  Maurits  Vandewoude  University  of  Antwerp  (BE)   Prof.  Keith  Wesnes  Northumbria  University  (UK)     Dr.  Dana  Bada7  ILSI  Europe  (BE)   Dr.  Pra7ma  Rao  Jas7  iLSI  Europe  (BE)   Dr.  Jeroen  Schuermans    ILSI  Europe  (BE)   Dr.  Peter  Putz  ILSI  Europe  (BE)  
  24. 24. Taskforce  members   Dr.  Siobhan  Mitchell  (Chair)  Nestlé  CH   Dr.  Caroline  Saunders  (Vice-­‐Chair)  PepsiCo  Interna7onal  UK   Prof.  Keith  Wesnes  (Co-­‐Chair)  Northumbria  University  UK     Dr.  Mélanie  Charron  Soremartec  Italia  –  Ferrero  Group  IT   Ms.  Anja  Holz  Südzucker/BENEO  Group  DE   Dr.  Sophie  Kergoat  Wrigley  (Mars  Inc.)  US   Dr.  Hasan  Mohajeri  DSM  CH   Dr.  Lionel  Noah  Sanofi-­‐Aven7s  R&D  FR   Dr.  María  Ramírez  Abbom  Nutri7on  ES   Dr.  John  Sijben  Danone  NL   Dr.  Berenike  Stracke  Schwabegroup  DE   Dr.  Barbara  Winters  Campbell  Soup  Company  US     Dr.  Pra7ma  Rao  Jas7  ILSI  Europe  BE   Dr.  Jeroen  Schuermans  ILSI  Europe  BE   Nutri?on  and  Mental  Performance  
  25. 25. Thank  You  !   Merci  !  

×