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©	IGD	2013	
Industry	Nutri3on	Strategy	Group	December	2013
©	IGD	2013	
Introduc)on	to	food	labelling	
	
What	is	the	purpose	of	food	labelling?	
•  Provide	consumers	with	informa3on	...
©	IGD	2013	
Introduc)on	to	food	labelling	(con)nued)	
Who	is	responsible	for	food	labelling	in	the	UK?	
•  The	responsibil...
©	IGD	2013	
Labelling	legisla)on	
Food	labelling	is	subject	to	strict	requirements	set	out	in	European	legisla3on.	To	
com...
©	IGD	2013	
Labelling	legisla)on	(con)nued)	
Ingredient	
list
STORE	IN	A	COOL	DRY	PLACE	
Made	in	the	UK	by	The	Manufacture...
©	IGD	2013	
Labelling	legisla)on	(con)nued)	
Nutri)on	labelling	
•  The	EU	Regula3on	published	in	October	2011	on	the	prov...
©	IGD	2013	
Ingredients	list	
Current	legisla)on	requires	pre-packed	food	to	be	labelled	with	a	list	of	ingredients		
	
Or...
©	IGD	2013	
Ingredients	list	(con)nued)	
Addi)ves	
•  An	addi3ve	will	be	listed	by	the	principal	func3on	it	serves	(e.g.	e...
©	IGD	2013	
Ingredients	list	(con)nued)	
Quan3ty	
declara3on	
(QUID)
Compound	
ingredient
Ingredients	
Pork	(70%),	Water,	...
©	IGD	2013	
Allergen	labelling	
•  Labelling	helps	consumers	avoid	foods	which	could	provoke	an	allergic	reac3on	or	
food	...
©	IGD	2013	
Allergen	labelling	(con)nued)	
•  Note:	some	highly	processed	ingredients	that	no	longer	contain	allergenic	pr...
©	IGD	2013	
Allergen	labelling	(con)nued)	
Gluten	
•  The	composi3on	and	labelling	of	foods	for	people	intolerant	to	glute...
©	IGD	2013	
Date	marking	
There	are	two	types	of	date	marking,	‘best	before’	and	‘use	by’:	
Best	before		
•  Used	for	most...
©	IGD	2013	
Date	marking	(con)nued)	
Use	by	
•  The	use	by	date	is	for	food	safety.		These	foods	have	a	shelf	life	of	a	re...
©	IGD	2013	
Date	marking	(con)nued)	
Other	date	marks	
•  Best	before	and	use	by	are	the	only	forms	of	date	marking	requir...
©	IGD	2013	
Front	of	pack	nutri)on	informa)on	
•  Nutri3on	informa3on	can	be	provided	on	the	front	of	food	packaging	to	gi...
©	IGD	2013	
Front	of	pack	nutri)on	informa)on	(con)nued)	
•  The	Department	of	Health	has	to	developed	a	harmonised	front	...
©	IGD	2013	
Back	of	pack	nutri)on	informa)on	
•  In	October	2011	an	EU	Regula3on	was	published,	sta3ng	that	mandatory	back...
©	IGD	2013	
Back	of	pack	nutri)on	informa)on	(con)nued)	
•  	In	addi3on	to	this	basic	requirement	some	labels	may	carry	in...
©	IGD	2013	
Back	of	pack	nutri)on	informa)on	(con)nued)	
•  Other	nutrients	may	be	added	to	the	nutrient	declara3on	on	a	v...
©	IGD	2013	
Nutri)on	and	health	claims	
•  Nutri3on	and	health	claims	made	on	foods	are	3ghtly	regulated	to	ensure	that	
c...
©	IGD	2013	
Nutri)on	claims		
Content	claims	e.g	‘contains	calcium’,	etc	
•  Can	only	be	made	if	they	are	on	a	list	in	
th...
©	IGD	2013	
Health	claims	
•  The	European	Food	Safety	Authority	(EFSA)	is	responsible	for	verifying	the	
scien3fic	substan...
©	IGD	2013	
Nutri)on	and	health	claims	con)nued	
Condi)ons	for	the	Use	of	Nutri)on	and	Health	Claims	
•  The	European	Comm...
©	IGD	2013	
Por)on	size	
Finding		por)on	size	informa)on	on	food	labels	
•  Por3on	size	(also	labelled	as	serving	size)	is...
©	IGD	2013	
Por)on	size	(con)nued)	
Por)on	size	guidance	
Por3on	size	informa3on	may	also	
be	given	elsewhere	on	pack	in	
...
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Information on Food Labelling and FOP_2013

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From IGD - Institute of Grocery Distribution

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Information on Food Labelling and FOP_2013

  1. 1. © IGD 2013 Industry Nutri3on Strategy Group December 2013
  2. 2. © IGD 2013 Introduc)on to food labelling What is the purpose of food labelling? •  Provide consumers with informa3on about their food, helping them to make informed decisions about which food to buy •  It is important that this informa3on is accurate and not misleading
  3. 3. © IGD 2013 Introduc)on to food labelling (con)nued) Who is responsible for food labelling in the UK? •  The responsibility for food labelling legisla3on and policy in the UK is split across government departments: –  The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) is responsible for labelling legisla3on in England that is principally non-safety, and for the coordina3on of labelling policy across Government –  The Food Standards Agency (FSA) is responsible for labelling and standards that are principally safety-based –  The Department of Health is responsible for nutri3on labelling policy in England Responsibility for food labelling varies across UK regions: •  For Scotland and Northern Ireland, all domes3c labelling and standards legisla3on is the responsibility of the FSA •  In Wales responsibility for general labelling requirements rests with the FSA and responsibility for nutri3on labelling lies with the Welsh Assembly Government
  4. 4. © IGD 2013 Labelling legisla)on Food labelling is subject to strict requirements set out in European legisla3on. To comply with legisla3on, basic labelling provisions for pre-packaged foods must include: •  The name of the food (legal or customary name not the brand name) •  A list of ingredients •  Quan3ta3ve declara3on of ingredients (QUID) may be required if the ingredient used is men3oned in the product name or emphasised by product informa3on e.g ‘chicken’ in chicken pie •  The appropriate date mark •  Any special storage condi3ons, condi3ons of use or prepara3on instruc3ons •  The name or business name and an address or registered office of either or both of – (i) the manufacturer or packer, or (ii) a seller established within the European Community •  Par3culars of the place of origin or provenance of the food if failure to give these might mislead a purchaser to a material degree as to the true origin or provenance of the food •  The weight or volume of the food
  5. 5. © IGD 2013 Labelling legisla)on (con)nued) Ingredient list STORE IN A COOL DRY PLACE Made in the UK by The Manufacturer, Customer Services Department, FREEPOST ABC, Postcode AB1 1AB Storage condi3ons Name and address of manufacturer 500g e Best before: 12 Feb 2011 Wheatmeal biscuits Ingredients: Wheat flour (54%), Palm Oil, Wholemeal Wheat Flour (16%), Sugar, Par3ally Inverted Sugar Syrup, Raising Agents (Sodium Bicarbonate, Tartaric Acid, Malic Acid), Salt, Dried Skimmed Milk Name of food Weight of food QUID Date mark Basic requirements for a food label:
  6. 6. © IGD 2013 Labelling legisla)on (con)nued) Nutri)on labelling •  The EU Regula3on published in October 2011 on the provision of food informa3on to consumers (Food Informa3on Regula3on) is mandatory and pre-packed products already providing nutri3on and ingredient informa3on will need to implement the following changes. –  All packs with an area >25cm2 will require nutri)on informa)on •  Where nutri3on informa3on is provided it must comply with the regula3on and shall include: energy, total fat, saturates, carbohydrate, sugars, protein and salt •  Previously nutri3on informa3on was provided as either: i) energy, protein, carbohydrates and fat, (known as a 'Group 1' or 'Big 4' declara3on) or ii) energy, protein, carbohydrates, sugars, fat, saturates, fibre and sodium (known as a 'Group 2', 'Big 4 + liKle 4' or '4 + 4' declara3on) The transi)on period for implemen)ng the new labelling format must be complete by December 2014
  7. 7. © IGD 2013 Ingredients list Current legisla)on requires pre-packed food to be labelled with a list of ingredients Order of Ingredients •  Ingredients are listed in descending order by weight (with the ingredient present in greatest quan3ty first), as determined at the 3me they were used in the prepara3on of the food Quan)ty of ingredients •  If an ingredient is men3oned in the name of the food (such as ‘chicken’ in chicken pie), or is emphasised on the label in words (e.g. ‘made with real cream’) or pictures, or is usually associated with the food (as lamb is with shepherd’s pie), the amount contained in the food will be given as a percentage. This should appear either next to the name of the food product, or in the list of ingredients at the relevant point
  8. 8. © IGD 2013 Ingredients list (con)nued) Addi)ves •  An addi3ve will be listed by the principal func3on it serves (e.g. emulsifier), followed by its name or E number •  Where an addi3ve has been given an E number, this means that it has passed safety tests and has been approved for use in the UK and in the rest of Europe. This includes substances which occur naturally in foods and are used as addi3ves. Compound ingredients •  Where an ingredient is made up of several other ingredients, all the individual ingredients will be given in the ingredients list either instead of, or in addi3on to, the name of the compound food Foods that do not need to provide a list of ingredients •  Single ingredient foods such, as buier and flour, do not need to give a list of ingredients, nor do alcoholic drinks (above 1.2% vol.)
  9. 9. © IGD 2013 Ingredients list (con)nued) Quan3ty declara3on (QUID) Compound ingredient Ingredients Pork (70%), Water, Rusk (Wheat Flour, Salt, Raising Agent: Ammonium Bicarbonate). Potato Starch, Pork Gelatine, Wheat Flour, Salt, Dextrose, Ground Spice (Pepper, Nutmeg), Emulsifiers: Sodium Di- and Tripolyphosphate; Preservative: Sodium Sulphite; Antioxidants: Ascorbic Acid, Citric Acid; Extracted Spice (Pepper, Capsicum, Ginger, Mace, Nutmeg, Coriander, Sage). Filled into pork protein casings. Addi3ves Example of a typical ingredient list
  10. 10. © IGD 2013 Allergen labelling •  Labelling helps consumers avoid foods which could provoke an allergic reac3on or food intolerance •  EU legisla3on (EU Direc3ve 2000/13/EC) requires that 14 allergenic food ingredients, and deriva3ves, be declared on prepacked foods. These include: *Includes Brazil nuts, hazel nuts, almonds and walnuts. Pine nuts and coconuts are not classed as nuts so they are not listed as allergens. If these are present as an ingredient in the product they will be listed in the ingredients list •  It is worth no3ng that peanuts are not true tree nuts, so must ALWAYS be declared separately from true tree nuts • Cereals containing gluten • Molluscs • Celery • Mustard • Crustaceans • Nuts from trees* • Eggs • Peanuts • Fish • Sesame • Lupin • Soya • Milk (including lactose) • Sulphites > 10ppm
  11. 11. © IGD 2013 Allergen labelling (con)nued) •  Note: some highly processed ingredients that no longer contain allergenic proteins are exempt e.g. wheat based glucose syrup, fully refined soybean oil •  Where more than one ingredient or processing aid is derived from the same allergen e.g. skimmed milk powder and caseinates (both from milk), it would be necessary to make it clear for each ingredient concerned. •  Allergenic ingredients should be highlighted in the ingredient list in a way that clearly dis3nguishes it from the rest of the list of ingredients, such as a dis3nc3ve font, bold type or a background colour. •  If the allergen is not clear from the ingredient name, the named allergen must appear next to the ingredient e.g. Casein (milk). Allergens are no longer permiied in a separate allergen box. •  Example: Ingredients: Cooked egg pasta (water, Durum wheat, egg), Beef, Tomatoes, Cheddar cheese (milk) Single cream (milk), Carrot, Onion, Celery, wheat flour, Rapeseed oil, Butter (milk), oregano, English Mustard
  12. 12. © IGD 2013 Allergen labelling (con)nued) Gluten •  The composi3on and labelling of foods for people intolerant to gluten is governed by EU legisla3on •  The gluten content of any food labelled “gluten free” must not exceed 20 mg/kg •  Very low gluten claims can be made on foods, made from wheat, rye, barley and/ or oats (or their crossbred varie3es), that are specially processed to reduce the level of gluten to <=100 mg/kg •  These rules mean that the phrase 'suitable for coeliacs' can only be used alongside the terms 'gluten free' or 'very low gluten' and cannot be used on its own
  13. 13. © IGD 2013 Date marking There are two types of date marking, ‘best before’ and ‘use by’: Best before •  Used for most foods and indicates the period for which a food can reasonably be expected to retain its op3mum condi3on quality (eg it will not be stale) •  The best before date is shown as the day, month and year in that order •  Alterna3vely: Ø  For food expected to keep for 3 months or less, the best before date may be shown as the day and month Ø  For foods expected to keep for more than 3 months but no longer than 18 months, the date mark may be shown as ‘best before end’ followed by the month and year Ø  For foods expected to keep for more than 18 months, the date mark may be shown as ‘best before end’ followed by the date in terms of the month and year or the year only
  14. 14. © IGD 2013 Date marking (con)nued) Use by •  The use by date is for food safety. These foods have a shelf life of a rela3vely short period, ater which their consump3on would present a risk of food poisoning •  The use by date is the date up to and including when the food may be used safely (eg cooked or processed or consumed) if it has been stored correctly –  For example, ‘use by 10 May’ means use by midnight on 10 May •  Once a food with a use by date on it has been opened, any instruc3ons for use should be followed –  For example ‘eat within three days of opening’ •  The use by date overrides any instruc3on on use of the food once opened. –  For example, if the food is opened the 9 May, and the use by date is 10 May, the food should not be consumed beyond midnight on 10 May even if it says to eat within 3 days of opening
  15. 15. © IGD 2013 Date marking (con)nued) Other date marks •  Best before and use by are the only forms of date marking required by law and are for use by consumers •  Best before and use by dates should not be confused with retailer markings such as ‘sell by’ or ‘display un3l’ which are instruc3ons to shop staff Freezing food •  If a food can be frozen, its life can be extended beyond the use by date •  However, any instruc3ons on the pack must be followed. For example, –  ‘freeze on day of purchase’ –  ‘cook from frozen’ –  ‘defrost thoroughly before use and use within 24 hours’
  16. 16. © IGD 2013 Front of pack nutri)on informa)on •  Nutri3on informa3on can be provided on the front of food packaging to give consumers a quick guide to the nutrient content of the product. •  In October 2011 an EU Regula3on on the provision of food informa3on to consumers (Food Informa3on Regula3on) was published, sta3ng that in addi3on to mandatory back of pack nutri3on informa3on, front of pack nutri3on labelling may also be used. •  Two systems for front of pack labelling have been in existence since before development of the Food Informa3on Regula3on The two systems are: Guideline Daily Amounts (Now referred to as Reference Intakes) and traffic light colour coding. Calories in one por3on or serving of the food The percentage of your Reference Intakes of calories that a por3on of this food gives you Guideline Daily Amounts (Now Reference Intakes) • RIs tell you the amount of calories, sugar, fat, saturated fat (saturates) and salt a por3on of that food provides • The informa3on given on the front of pack is the quan3ty in grams of each nutrient provided by a por3on of the food, and this quan3ty expressed as a percentage of the RI for that nutrient RIs are a guide, not a target, and are based on an ‘average person’. Men and women have different requirements. RIs are based on the requirements for an average woman
  17. 17. © IGD 2013 Front of pack nutri)on informa)on (con)nued) •  The Department of Health has to developed a harmonised front of pack labelling system with the view that all companies will adopt this consistent approach to make it easier for consumers to make healthier choices. •  New labelling will include the following informa3on presented consistently per por3on of food: –  The amount of energy - presented in kilocalories and kilojoules (in equal prominence) –  fat –  saturated fat –  salt –  sugar •  The informa3on will also be presented as a percentage of an adult’s ‘Reference Intake’ - and will show how much of the maximum daily intake a por3on accounts for •  A consistent colour-coding system will be used to determine if a nutrient is red, amber or green (based on per 100g values not per por3on except where the amount in a por3on exceeds 30% of the RI). Energy will not be colour-coded. •  The system will s3ll be voluntary, but companies are being encouraged to sign up to the scheme as it now forms one of the pledges under the Public Heath Responsibility Deal. •  Example of Hybrid labelling
  18. 18. © IGD 2013 Back of pack nutri)on informa)on •  In October 2011 an EU Regula3on was published, sta3ng that mandatory back of pack nutri3on informa3on must be provided on pre-packed foods. •  Products currently not declaring any nutri3on informa3on must implement by December 2016 and products currently providing this informa3on must implement the necessary changes by December 2014. •  The nutri3on informa3on presented on the back of food packs must be in the form of a table where space permits. •  This informa3on will always be in the same order and must include energy plus 6 further nutrients. •  Energy is in kcal and kJ per 100g, all other nutrients are given in g per 100g or 100ml of the product as sold Per 100g Energy 1500kJ/356kcal Fat 7.4g of which: saturates 1.1g Carbohydrates 58.1g of which: sugars 16.8g Protein 9.9g Salt 0.1g Sodium is no longer permiied although a statement can be added explaining salt can be due to naturally occurring sodium.
  19. 19. © IGD 2013 Back of pack nutri)on informa)on (con)nued) •  In addi3on to this basic requirement some labels may carry informa3on per por)on •  For products that require further prepara3on but without the addi3on of other ingredients the informa3on as consumed may be presented if appropriate cooking instruc3ons are provided within the handling instruc3ons •  The amount of nutrients can be declared as % Guideline Daily Amounts (GDA)* per por3on. Energy is calculated using the formula: Kcals=(protein (g) x 4) + (carbohydrate (g) x 4) + (fat(g) x 9) + (fibre (g) x 2) KJ = (protein (g) x 17) + (carbohydrate (g) x 17) + (fat (g) x 37) + (fibre (g) x 8) Salt equivalent is calculated as follows: Sodium x 2.5 *GDA values are provided as Reference Intakes in the Food Information Regulation and the values differ slightly from UK GDAs.
  20. 20. © IGD 2013 Back of pack nutri)on informa)on (con)nued) •  Other nutrients may be added to the nutrient declara3on on a voluntary basis including polyols, starch, monounsaturates, polyunsaturates, vitamins and minerals •  The new Food Informa3on Regula3on (FIR) guidance must be implemented by December 2014 and un3l then some products may display nutri3on informa3on in the following format. Some products may also list the Reference Intakes* with the % RI per por3on.
  21. 21. © IGD 2013 Nutri)on and health claims •  Nutri3on and health claims made on foods are 3ghtly regulated to ensure that consumers are not misled by unsubstan3ated, exaggerated or untruthful claims •  Regula3on EC No. 1924/2006 defines how nutri3on and health claims can be made in labelling, adver3sing, promo3onal campaigns and other commercial communica3ons •  The regula3on lays down rules for the substan3a3on and communica3on of these claims. •  Full nutri)on informa)on must be provided on pack whenever a nutri3on or health claim is made.
  22. 22. © IGD 2013 Nutri)on claims Content claims e.g ‘contains calcium’, etc •  Can only be made if they are on a list in the Annex to regula3on 1924/2006 •  Only the vitamins and minerals listed in the Regula3on may be added to foods and must be present in sufficient quan3ty in the food to have beneficial effects •  No nutri3on or health claims can be made for micronutrients with levels less than 15% RDA per serving ‘as consumed’ •  Nutri3on and health claims rela3ng to beverages containing more than 1.2% alcohol are prohibited, except those which refer to a reduc3on in the alcohol or energy content Compara)ve claims e.g ‘increased calcium’, ‘reduced fat’ etc •  May only be made between foods or drinks in the same category that are similar in terms of nutri3on content or are alterna3ves for consump3on (e.g. spread/buier) •  A compara3ve claim may only be made with food which itself cannot make the claim •  Any such claim, may only be made where the reduc3on in content is at least 30 % (micronutrients 10% difference; sodium/salt 25% difference) •  Nutri3on claims state that a food has beneficial nutri3onal proper3es, e.g. ‘low fat’, ‘no added sugar’, ‘high in fibre’, etc
  23. 23. © IGD 2013 Health claims •  The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) is responsible for verifying the scien3fic substan3a3on of health claims. The European Commission then decides whether to authorise the claim •  Most health claims are so called ‘generic’ health claims, which means that they are scien3fically well-established, e.g. calcium and strong bones. These may be used providing the product meets the condi3ons of use •  All other claims, including those for children’s development, and for disease risk reduc3on, must undergo a specific authorisa3on procedure •  Claims that a food prevents treats or cures a disease (‘Medicinal claims’) are prohibited •  Health claims state that health benefits can result from consuming a given food, e.g. ‘vitamin D aids calcium absorp3on for strong bones’
  24. 24. © IGD 2013 Nutri)on and health claims con)nued Condi)ons for the Use of Nutri)on and Health Claims •  The European Commission will develop ‘Nutrient Profiles’ with regard to levels of saturated fat, sugar and sodium •  Mee3ng the nutrient profile will be a condi3on in order to make nutri3on or health claims
  25. 25. © IGD 2013 Por)on size Finding por)on size informa)on on food labels •  Por3on size (also labelled as serving size) is normally given with the nutri3on table on the back of pack •  If the product has nutri3on informa3on on the front of the pack, por3on size may be shown here too Por)on size informa)on and labelling regula)ons •  EU Regula3on on the provision of food informa3on to consumers (Food Informa3on Regula3on) states that mandatory nutri3on informa3on must be provided on pre-packed foods. Nutri3on informa3on must be given per 100g or 100ml of product and informa3on may also be given voluntarily per por3on. •  If the por3on size is stated it must be quan3fied on the label and the number of por3ons contained in the package must also be stated.
  26. 26. © IGD 2013 Por)on size (con)nued) Por)on size guidance Por3on size informa3on may also be given elsewhere on pack in addi3on to the nutri3on table. Examples of por3on size guidance include: •  This pack contains 4 servings •  As a guide we recommend this product provides 2 servings •  1 serving = 2 pieces •  Suggested serving = a quarter of a pot •  A typical serving is 75g Example of back of pack nutri)on informa)on showing por)on size • Nutri3on table for a product in a 200g pot • Por3on size is 50g or a quarter of a pot • Informa3on is shown per 100g, as is the legal requirement, and for one quarter of a pot por3on Per 100g One-quarter of a pot (50g) provides Energy 1005KJ/245kcal 505KJ/125kcal Fat 16.8g 8.4g of which: saturates 2.0g 1.0g Carbohydrates 13.3g 6.7g of which: sugars 0.2g 0.1g Protein 9.2g 4.6g Salt 1.0g 0.5g

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