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Case Study Final Report: 
Change Management Issues, Interventions and Processes within 
David Jones 
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
ii 
TABLE OF CONTENTS 
TABLE OF CONTENTS……………………………………………………………………………………………...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
iii 
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 
This report aims to analyse key organisational chan...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
1 
BACKGROUND 
David Jones is an Australian department store which operates...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
2 
I. INTRODUCTION 
Competing in an ever-growing global market, organisatio...
Adrian Petrie 
II. DAVID JONES AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL FRAMEWORK 
There are numerous factors which affect how an organisatio...
Adrian Petrie 
options have already been available and proven successful, attracting these customers 
towards the online m...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
5 
B. Technological Investment 
David Jones has found itself lagging behind...
Adrian Petrie 
for customer interaction with the organisation, as it enables ‘customers to choose where, 
how and when the...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
7 
of retail outlets’ (Williams 2012). 
Furthermore, Williams (2012) explai...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
8 
B. Technological Investment 
Technology is continually advancing, changi...
Adrian Petrie 
stakeholders (commitment planning); and creating organisational structures that help to 
promote the change...
Adrian Petrie 
 Performance contingency – rewards that are suitable, depending on the level of 
MMH356 Case Study Final R...
Adrian Petrie 
Similarly, introducing new stores requires a period of adjustment as both the business and 
consumers adjus...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
12 
VI. CONCLUSION 
David Jones is currently undergoing change in three key...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
13 
VII. RECOMMENDATIONS 
A. Management Restructure 
Managerial positions h...
Adrian Petrie 
MMH356 Case Study Final Report 
14 
REFERENCES 
Beer, M & Nohria, N 2000, ‘Cracking the Code of Change’, Ha...
Adrian Petrie 
Merrell, P 2012, ‘Effective Change Management: The Simple Truth’, Management Services, 
vol. 56, no. 2, pp....
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Change Management Report - David Jones

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Change Management Report - David Jones

  1. 1. Case Study Final Report: Change Management Issues, Interventions and Processes within David Jones Adrian Petrie MMH356 Change Management Unit Chair: Jan Fermelis Tutor: Jan Fermelis Trimester 2, 2012 Submitted: 3 September 2012
  2. 2. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………iii BACKGROUND .............................................................................................................................. 1 I. INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 2 II. DAVID JONES AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL FRAMEWORK ........................................................... 3 III. KEY CHANGE-RELATED ISSUES AND INTERVENTIONS ........................................................... 4 A. Management Restructure .................................................................................................. 4 B. Technological Investment .................................................................................................. 5 C. Physical Presence .............................................................................................................. 5 IV. ADOPTED CHANGE PROCESSES AND STRATEGIES ................................................................ 6 A. Management Restructure .................................................................................................. 6 B. Technological Investment .................................................................................................. 8 C. Physical Presence .............................................................................................................. 9 V. CONSEQUENCES.................................................................................................................. 10 VI. CONCLUSION................................................................................................................... 12 VII. RECOMMENDATIONS ...................................................................................................... 13 A. Management Restructure ................................................................................................ 13 B. Technological Investment ................................................................................................ 13 C. Physical Presence ............................................................................................................ 13 REFERENCES…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….14
  3. 3. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This report aims to analyse key organisational changes within David Jones, by evaluating change interventions, the issues behind these interventions, and the strategies and the processes adopted by the company. Consequences associated with the organisational changes are discussed, followed by recommendations for each observed change. Organisations must continually adapt their business practices to retain a competitive advantage and avoid becoming stagnant in an increasingly competitive market. An organisations ability to adapt to environmental pressures, and alter strategic plans accordingly, will ultimately determine the success or failure of change initiatives. The three key change initiatives analysed for David Jones are concerned with managerial restructures, technological investments and the expansion of the company’s physical presence. Management within the company has been restructured to combat a decline in sales (Durie 2012) and more accurately reflect various functions within the business (David Jones 2012a). David Jones is heavily investing in improvements to online services, including website functionality and mobile applications, in addition to constructing new stores across Australia to allow for greater customer engagement (David Jones 2012a). To implement the various changes more effectively, it is recommended that David Jones strategise ways to differentiate itself from its competition. These recommendations include:  Managerial involvement with employees at ‘shop floor’ level, enabling interaction and a more horizontal flow of communication.  Fast distribution channels for online purchases, with options available to customers for further improved delivery efficiency.  Provide an unprecedented level of commitment to customer service through the use of fashion stylists, with expert knowledge and fashion ideas that can be shared with customers should they choose to have this interaction.
  4. 4. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 1 BACKGROUND David Jones is an Australian department store which operates in the retail industry, selling a wide range of fashion, beauty and home products of national and international brands (David Jones 2012b). Located nation-wide, except for in the Northern Territory, customer satisfaction and engagement are of top priority for an organisation founded on its original mission ‘to sell "the best and most exclusive goods" and to carry "a stock that embraces the everyday wants of mankind at large"’ (David Jones 2012b). Services are also an integral aspect of the organisation, with various incentive programs, gift cards and personal services such as bra fitting offered to enhance customers’ experiences (David Jones 2012c).
  5. 5. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 2 I. INTRODUCTION Competing in an ever-growing global market, organisations must continually improve their operations in order to secure or maintain a competitive advantage. One such aspect is change, which involves adapting business practices to align with altering values and expectations within society. Implementing appropriate interventions to align with strategic plans and manage environmental factors is key. Waddell, Cummings & Worley (2011) describe an intervention as a set of ‘planned actions or events that…help an organisation increase its effectiveness’. This report analyses key change processes within David Jones, and implements change management theory into the case study. In addition it aims to highlight the opportunities available for growth and development when organisations ‘get change right’.
  6. 6. Adrian Petrie II. DAVID JONES AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL FRAMEWORK There are numerous factors which affect how an organisation operates within its market. Forces which are external to an organisation’s control, that affect how it makes decisions and adapts to changing needs, are known as environments (Waddell, Cummings & Worley 2011, p. 275). Mason (2008, pp. 48-49) describes environments as ‘complex adaptive systems’ that are unpredictable by nature but provide opportunities for an organisation if managed and accepted appropriately. The environmental framework can be broken down into the general, task and enacted environment. Waddell, Cummings and Worley (2011, pp. 275-276) explain the three environments as follows:  General environment – external forces that influence an organisation, such as legal, MMH356 Case Study Final Report 3 technological, and economic forces.  Task environment – groups that have a direct interaction with an organisation and affect its success/failure, such as customers, competitors or suppliers.  Enacted environment - the perception management has of its organisation’s standing in the environment, such as customer satisfaction for certain products. Whilst David Jones has no control over the general environment at all, it can certainly influence how it operates within the task environment. Declining profit margins and recent reductions in company performance (Durie 2012) have resulted in the various management changes, and more varied avenues for customers to interact with the business. The organisation cannot control the number of customers who shop with them, but it can attract a larger number if more avenues to do so are given to consumers. Whilst David Jones must compete with large scale rivals such as Myer in an online marketplace, it also faces challenges from other existing competitors. David Jones has been relatively slow in promoting online shopping, compared to other organisations. For the most part, online customers already have preferred shops and websites to spend their money, such as ASOS or Amazon (Stafford 2012). Appealing to customers is an easy task when a need exists, but no solution is currently available. However when other online
  7. 7. Adrian Petrie options have already been available and proven successful, attracting these customers towards the online methods of David Jones may be more difficult. III. KEY CHANGE-RELATED ISSUES AND INTERVENTIONS MMH356 Case Study Final Report 4 A. Management Restructure A major change related issue currently observed within David Jones surrounds the restructuring of its management. Following accusations of sexual harassment in 2010, former chief executive officer, Mark McInnes, resigned from his position in response to legal action being taken by a company employee (Fife-Yeomans & Byrnes 2010). McInnes was accused of making ‘unwelcome[d] comments of a sexual nature and unwelcome[d] sexual advances’ (Kontominas 2012). The immediate resignation and subsequent legal battle lead to the appointment of Paul Zahra to the position of Chief Executive Officer (Fife-Yeomans & Byrnes 2010). Whilst his actions were both inappropriate and illegal, it can be argued that McInnes handled the situation in a positive manner. Fife-Yeomans and Byrnes (2010) report McInnes as acting proactively after learning of the legal complaint, informing the David Jones board of his actions and resigning immediately. Whilst nothing short of a resignation would have been accepted by the public or media, McInnes did not wait to be told his time at the company was up – he initiated and accepted a punishment in a manner that deserves to restore a level of credibility to him and to David Jones. More recently, David Jones has undergone a restructure across all senior management in addition to the change in chief executive officer. A decline in sales over the past year is a major factor leading to the managerial changes (Durie 2012). The earnings of 2012 are down from those in 2011. The first half saw a 20% reduction in profits, with a staggering expected drop of up to 40% by the completion of 2012 (Williams 2012). Profits for 2011 reached $160m, and are expected to only arrive at $100m for 2012, after earning $85m in the first half (Durie 2012). This significant decline in sales sparks a need for immediate action, with one such intervention being a managerial restructure.
  8. 8. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 5 B. Technological Investment David Jones has found itself lagging behind competitors of late, in particular rival Myer, ‘falling behind…both in terms of ideas and sales growth’ (Durie 2012). Arguably the largest area for growth and development for David Jones is in the field of technology, in regards to sales methods for employees and online/mobile shopping resources for customers. Sabherwal et al (cited in Guillemette & Paré 2012, p.530) explains how information technology processes must correlate with business objectives, and be constantly adapted to reflect changing environments and technological advancements. An inability to attract new customers and satisfy existing ones through online avenues partially contributes to the organisation’s declining sales and need for investment in technology. Online sales for 2011 in Australia accounted for merely 4.9% of total sales (David Jones 2012a p. 4). Despite this being an extremely low rate, considering the possibilities of conducting business online, this does allow for room for improvement. If this opportunity for growth is capital ised on, revenue can dramatically increase going forward. To intervene the poor performance, management plan to transform David Jones into an Omni Channel Retailing (OCR) organisation, a concept described as ‘integrating the shopping experience across all…marketing channels…and…sales channels’ (David Jones 2012a, p. 3). The aim of this process is to provide customers with greater flexibility and avenues to purchase goods at David Jones – including mobile applications to shop ‘on the go’, improved website functionality and accessibility, and an improved customer service experience in stores (David Jones 2012a). Customers are satisfied in many different ways and shop according to certain needs and wants. Providing a greater range of options for David Jones to appeal to customers through the use of technology will assist the ease of interaction between business and customers. C. Physical Presence By comparison to other large scale organisations, David Jones imposes a relatively small physical presence in terms of number of stores across Australia, totalling 36 department stores nation-wide (David Jones 2012a, p.8). In an effort to align with the Omni Channel Retailing strategy, David Jones explains that additional stores provides greater opportunities
  9. 9. Adrian Petrie for customer interaction with the organisation, as it enables ‘customers to choose where, how and when they wish to shop’ (David Jones 2012a, p. 8). The intervention planned to increase store numbers and in turn, raise profits, is to construct an additional six full-line department stores in growing regions, and also add ‘smaller format stores’ to again increase opportunities for customer dealings (David Jones 2012a, p.8). The smaller format stores are designed to complement the larger department stores and reach ‘demographics which do not have major shopping centres’ (Harper 2012). The creation of these smaller sores is described as ‘making progress in the implementation of our…future strategic direction plan’ by chief executive officer, Paul Zahra (Harper 2012) . Consideration for smaller demographics highlights a well-rounded strategic plan for growing the business. It demonstrates management’s understanding that in order to attract more customers and increase market share, it must also provide physical locations to aid new technological avenues. These locations enable consumers to experience the level of service and commitment to customer satisfaction that David Jones emphasises. Whilst they sell goods, retailers fundamentally operate in a service industry (Konti & Devi 2011, p. 80). Konti and Devi (2011) further explain that in order to compete with global standards, offering high quality services to customers is essential to increase profitability and customer loyalty. Without this face-to-face interaction, attracting and retaining new customers is far more difficult, as customer satisfaction is often built upon in store experiences. IV. ADOPTED CHANGE PROCESSES AND STRATEGIES MMH356 Case Study Final Report 6 A. Management Restructure In order to restructure the management team, a number of steps have been implemented to align management with the future strategic direction of the organisation. The first step involved recruiting new candidates to fill seven new executive positions within the company (Williams 2012). To improve their performance and regain a competitive advantage within the market, David Jones employed new executives with a variety of different experiences in other organisations. These were executives ‘who have held senior positions at a wide range
  10. 10. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 7 of retail outlets’ (Williams 2012). Furthermore, Williams (2012) explains how successful executives were sought to fill new roles and restore a forward-moving culture, derived from strategic planning. Whilst some positions have become redundant, new positions have also been created, such as the roles of General Manager for marketing, promotions and publicity; Group Executive for marketing and financial services; and Executive for strategic planning (Williams 2012). It can be argued that by definition, this is not a restructure, but rather a reshuffle within the organisation – an arrangement of new faces and ideas appointed to more strategy-specific roles; and to clear out some of the ‘dead wood’ that had not seen David Jones progress in recent years. Waddell, Jones and George (2011, p. 15) describe restructuring as the downsizing of an organisation to assist in cost reduction and improve efficiency. Whilst some management positions at David Jones have been discarded, others have also been created. A more accurate description of the change process undertaken would be that of re-engineering. Waddell, Cummings & Worley (2011, p. 287) explain re-engineering as the radical redesign of an organisation’s core work processes, which improves the cohesiveness of different tasks to increase productivity and efficiency. It involves dramatically changing the way work is done, and motivating the change. Transparency and open communication channels across all levels of the organisation are vital when such a dramatic change to management is the response to a redirection of strategic targets. Communicating the reasons for decisions to stakeholders, particularly employees, helps to create more understanding and acceptance of the change (Merrell 2012, p.20). In turn, this leaves employees feeling more valued within the organisation than if they had been left in ‘in the dark’. Merrell (2012, p. 20) argues that open communication can subsequently motivate employees and create a more positive culture than if changes are thrust upon workers without their understanding for the need for changes.
  11. 11. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 8 B. Technological Investment Technology is continually advancing, changing the way organisations perform and execute business activities on a daily basis. Basing its new Omni Channel Retailing strategy on the success of leading international department stores, David Jones is implementing a variety of different steps to enhance technological systems and allow for greater flexibility and customer engagement (David Jones 2012a, pp. 3-4). To add to the customer experience, David Jones (2012a, pp. 4-5) outlines the key transformation stages for the organisation, including the following:  The launch and update of a user friendly mobile site and mobile application, which provides an avenue for people to shop ‘on the go’.  Appointing IBM to integrate Omni Channel Retailing resources and update systems.  Increasing the number of online SKUs available (providing a greater range of online products).  Introducing a new Point of Sales system. This will aid employee efficiency, therefore providing better customer service which often results in greater customer satisfaction. In order to manage the change effectively, David Jones must perform activities that will give the implemented changes the best chances for success. Waddell, Cummings and Worley (2011, p. 163) set out activities for managing change in 5 stages - motivating the change, creating a vision, developing political support, managing the transition and sustaining momentum. In terms of technology, managing the change is a key activity, ‘transition[ing] from the current state to the desired future state’ (Waddell, Cummings & Worley 2011, p. 162). Bechkard and Harris (cited in Waddell, Cummings & Worley 2011, p. 172) explain that the transition stage to implement change requires setting tasks linked to the goals of change (activity planning); gaining the commitment and support of the change from key
  12. 12. Adrian Petrie stakeholders (commitment planning); and creating organisational structures that help to promote the change (management structures). David Jones has put in place strategies to assist the administration of this change. Its structural changes to management have not only aligned managerial roles to specific task-related areas within the organisation, but have also provided an avenue to assist in the introduction of new technology. Information Technology structures are continually adapting to align with the Omni Channel Retaining strategy, via the addition of new staff and experts to improve digital and online functions (David Jones 2012a, p.8). MMH356 Case Study Final Report 9 C. Physical Presence In order for further stores to be created and operate effectively, additional human resources are required within the organisation. David Jones will be employing 200 new staff to work across the new stores and transition into a more technologically advanced organisation (David Jones 2012a, p. 8). As business needs lead to the emergence of more staff, David Jones must consider the need for motivating new employees who have not previously worked within the organisation, or perhaps even the retail industry. Merely increasing the number of stores does not automatically increase revenue, unless those working within them are committed to achieving organisational goals. Initial enthusiasm for work might be self-motivating for some, however in order to maintain this commitment to goals and tasks, employees must see a value or purpose in the activities they are performing for the business. This ‘purpose’ is often rewards for work. Waddell, Cummings and Worley (2011, p. 236) describe the relationship between rewards and performance via the value expectancy theory, which explains that employees exert more effort in achieving goals when they perceive the outcomes of work to be valuable. According to Waddell, Cummings and Worley (2011, p. 236-237), rewards that motivate employees are the ones that include the following features:  Availability – sufficient reward for work done  Timeliness – rewards given after work is complete, not having a large time distance between task completion and reward
  13. 13. Adrian Petrie  Performance contingency – rewards that are suitable, depending on the level of MMH356 Case Study Final Report 10 achievement  Durability – the length of time a reward last for  Equity – rewards that are perceived as fair amongst all employees  Visibility – rewards to one employee must be made known to others also. This demonstrates that rewards are available and highlights the positive consequences associated with high performance. It will be essential for David Jones to effectively motivate employees through rewards systems, in order for them to deliver the service and work that is required for the organisation to achieve its strategic objectives. V. CONSEQUENCES Careful consideration of how changes are to be implemented is vital. Without such in-depth analysis of potential outcomes, inappropriate implementation of changes may result, which can adversely affect the success of that proposed change. Beer and Nohria (2000, p.133) explain that vast amounts of information and available advice complicate change initiatives, with this confusion leading to an alarming 70% failure rate for the changes. Put simply, there are real consequences for organisations who fail to implement change successfully. Managerial restructures affect the whole organisation and everyone working within it. As new positions emerge and others are made redundant, confusion surrounding hierarchies and whom to report to may result. Staff may disapprove of their new management, and whilst this decision is largely out of their hands, their performance may decline as a result of their dissatisfaction towards changes. However, based on David Jones’ commitment to customer satisfaction through flexibility and customer engagement (David Jones 2012a), it is likely that the new structural hierarchies will be clearly explained to employees, so that they understand any new roles or responsibilities that will affect how they serve customers. Communication between employees and management should flow more smoothly, as positions have been aligned with specific functions within the organisation (David Jones 2012a).
  14. 14. Adrian Petrie Similarly, introducing new stores requires a period of adjustment as both the business and consumers adjust to one another in a new demographic setting. Excitement and interest in a new store may bring about high sales immediately, or there may be ‘settling in’ period where sales are low to begin with. However, the planned stores are to be constructed in ‘high value, high growth areas’ (David Jones 2012a, p. 8), so regardless of speed, it is likely that the new stores will be profitable. The introduction of new technology systems, such as Point of Sales systems and additional online services (David Jones 2012a) may confuse employees and reduce productivity whilst they learn how to operate these resources. However, past successes of international stores with similar Omni Channel Retailing models (David Jones 2012a, p. 4) would suggest that as the changes in technology are completely implemented and understood by all employees, productivity and efficiency should increase. MMH356 Case Study Final Report 11
  15. 15. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 12 VI. CONCLUSION David Jones is currently undergoing change in three key areas. Management has been restructured to realign business functions to strategic plans (David Jones 2012a). Development in technology is observed in online shopping methods, via improved functionality and layout for the company website (David Jones 2012a). In addition, mobile applications allow for engagement with the business whilst customers are busy in their everyday lives (David Jones 2012a). Finally, the physical presence of the company is undergoing expansion, with six new stores and additional smaller format stores being constructed across Australian communities to grow the business profile and further enhance opportunity for customer engagement (David Jones 2012a).
  16. 16. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 13 VII. RECOMMENDATIONS A. Management Restructure Managerial positions have been restructured to better correlate with functions within the organisation (David Jones 2012a). To continue to develop these positions that represent sub-sections within the company, David Jones could require all managers spend one day a month working on the floor with salespersons. This could allow for more open communication channels between employees and management, and for more ideas to be voiced – ideas that can be taken to executives and potentially influence further decisions. B. Technological Investment To compete in a competitive online market, David Jones must differentiate itself from competitors. The company will need to ensure that its distribution channels are efficient and can offer prompt delivery of goods to consumers (Stafford 2012). A competitive timeframe for deliveries would be 2-3 days, comparing to Myer’s delivery time which is usually 4-7 days (Stafford 2012). To aid the implementation of technological strategies, David Jones could offer priority shipping options, whereby customers can pay an additional fee for faster delivery. C. Physical Presence Emphasis is placed upon customer engagement and satisfaction (David Jones 2012a), therefore David Jones could attract customers by offering a unique service in its new stores. Stylists with expert fashion knowledge may be employed to assist customers. Appointments with stylists can be made, with no appointment fee charged after $500 is spent. This demonstrates a higher level of service to the organisation’s customers and may attract people to its new stores to ‘test’ this unique offering.
  17. 17. Adrian Petrie MMH356 Case Study Final Report 14 REFERENCES Beer, M & Nohria, N 2000, ‘Cracking the Code of Change’, Harvard Business Review, vol. 78, no. 3, pp. 133-141. David Jones 2012a, David Jones announces its future strategic direction, retrieved 4 August 2012, <http://www.davidjones.com.au/files/ASX-Release-Strategic-Directions-21-March- 12> David Jones 2012b, 'About David Jones' retrieved 5 August 2012 <http://www.davidjones.com.au/About-David-Jones> David Jones 2012c, 'Services' retrieved 5 August 2012 <http://www.davidjones.com.au/services/Our-Promise> David Jones 2012d, 'Stores', retrieved 5 August 2012 <http://www.davidjones.com.au/stores> Durie, J 2012, ‘Devil’s in the retail at David Jones’, The Australian, 22 March, retrieved 29 August, <http://www.theaustralian.com.au/business/opinion/devils-in-the-retail-at-davidjones/ story-e6frg9io-1226306621207> Fife-Yeomans, J & Byrnes, H 2010, ‘David Jones scandal: Mark McInnes a playboy brought down by lust’, The Daily Telegraph, 19 June, retrieved 29 August 2012, <http://www.news.com.au/business/worklife/david-jones-scandal-mark-mcinnes-a-playboy- bought-down-by-lust/story-e6frfm9r-1225881568718> Guillemette, M & Paré 2012, 'Toward a new theory of the contribution of the IT function in organizations' MIS Quarterly, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 529-551. Harper, J 2012, ‘New-look David Jones to open in Malvern Central shopping centre’, Herald Sun, 29 August, retrieved 1 September 2012, <http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/new-look- david-jones-to-open-in-malvern-central-shopping-centre/story-e6frf7jo- 1226460602342> Konti, P & Devi, V 2011, ‘Impact of retail services on retail sales’, Journal of Business & Retail Management Research, vol. 6, no. 1, pp. 73-81. Kontominas, B 2010, ‘David Jones sex harassment case: publicist sues for $37m’, Sydney Morning Herald, 2 August, retrieved 29 August 2012, <http://www.smh.com.au/business/david-jones-sex-harassment-case-publicist-sues-for- 37m-20100802-112iw.html> Mason, R 2008, ‘Management actions, attitudes to change and perceptions of the external environment: A complexity theory approach’, Journal of General Management, vol. 34, no. 1, pp. 37-53.
  18. 18. Adrian Petrie Merrell, P 2012, ‘Effective Change Management: The Simple Truth’, Management Services, vol. 56, no. 2, pp.20-23. Stafford, P 2012, Myer, ‘David Jones start targeting web competitors – three of the biggest challenges they’ll have to overcome’, Smart Company, 1 June 2012, retrieved 31 August 2012, <http://www.smartcompany.com.au/retail/050003-myer-david-jones-start-targeting-web- competitors-three-of-the-biggest-challenges-they-ll-have-to-overcome/2.html> Waddell, D, Cummings, T & Worley, C 2011, Organisational Change: Development and Transformation, Cengage Learning, Victoria. Waddell, D, Jones, G, George, J 2011, Contemporary Management, McGraw-Hill, NSW Williams, K 2012 ‘David Jones in management restructure’, Herald Sun, 9 May, retrieved 29 August 2012, <http://www.heraldsun.com.au/business/david-jones-in-management-restructure/ MMH356 Case Study Final Report 15 story-fn7j19iv-1226351060417>

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