EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013Justin Vaïsse andSusi Dennisonwith Julien Barnes-Dacey,Dimitar Bechev, AnthonyDworkin, ...
ABOUT ECFRThe European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) isthe first pan-European think-tank. Launched in October2007, i...
EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013
Copyright of this publication is held by the European Councilon Foreign Relations. You may not copy, reproduce, republisho...
EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013STEERING GROUPVaira Vike-Freiberga and António Vitorino (co-chairs)Lluís Bassets, Charl...
AcknowledgementsThe authors would above all like to thank the Steering Group fortheir advice and input, which has been an ...
Foreword	 6Preface	 7Introduction	 9Chapter 1: China	 24Chapter 2: Russia	 40Chapter 3: United States	 58Chapter 4: Wider ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 20136ForewordThe Compagnia di San Paolo is one of the largest independent foundationsin ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 7It is a pleasure for us to present the 2013 edition of the European Foreign Policy...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 20138One of the key developments in European foreign policy in the last three yearswas t...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 9IntroductionIn the introduction to the first edition of the Scorecard, we wrote th...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201310expense of a focus on foreign-policy issues. But it will also depend on whetherEur...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 11guaranteeing European banks. Thus the crisis became less acute in the secondhalf ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201312Operation Pillar of Defence. Meanwhile, the transitions in post-revolutionaryNorth...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 13Europeans also slightly improved their performance on the United States,especiall...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201314Unity Resources Outcome Total Grade37 Relations with the US on Iranand weapons pro...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 15Unity Resources Outcome Total Grade54 Security sector reform2 1 2 5 D+11 Relation...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201316Figure 4European performance on cross-cutting themesCross-Cutting Themes* in 2012 ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 17such as China and Russia, on enlargement in its neighbourhood, and on the E3+3pro...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201318an “in/out” referendum on British membership of the EU by 2018. However,the Scorec...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 19Of the big three member states, France underwent the most obvious changein 2012 a...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201320However, there was also a drop in the number of “slackers”, which suggeststhat mem...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 21against Iran or by minimising disagreement in order to avoid paralysis, asin the ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201322member states, including between EU delegations and embassies across theworld, hav...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 23Internal and external challengesTThe near horizon is marked by serious challenges...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201324ChinaC+Overall gradeOverall grade 2011	 COverall grade 2010	 C+
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 25																 2012		 2011		 2010TRADE LIBERALISATION AND OVERALL RELATIONSHIP	...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201326Hillary Clinton, issued a joint statement on coordinating Asia policy, but this we...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 27member states. It is symptomatic of this tendency that the high-level economicdia...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201328After last year’s EU–China summit waspostponed because of the euro crisis, twosumm...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 29In 2012, Chinese investment in Europe hitanother record of $10 billion. The Chine...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201330The EU seeks fair competition and equalaccess to the Chinese market for publicproc...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 31Europeanswanttheircompaniestobeableto compete fairly against Chinese rivals.In 20...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201332In 2012, China did not become Europe’s“red knight” by massively purchasingsovereig...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 33Human-rights violations continued inChina in 2012 against the backgroundof the le...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201334In 2012, tensions continued between theEU and China over visits to Europe by theDa...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 35Europeans seek to cooperate with Chinain stopping nuclear proliferation, inpartic...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201336The EU has wide-ranging interests in Asiathat go beyond trade. In particular, it s...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 37Europeans aim to cooperate with Chinato limit the arms trade, support goodgoverna...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201338EuropeanswantChinatotakeresponsibilityfor global governance, especially at theUN a...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 39The EU aims to secure China’s cooperationon climate change, including on associat...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201340RussiaB-Overall gradeOverall grade 2011	 C+Overall grade 2010	 C+
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 41CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issues																 2012		 2011		 2...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201342peacefully. It also relaxed controls on the media: between January and March,many ...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 43EU–Russia trade relations could have been the success story of the year. InAugust...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201344role – the most important issues were handled either by the member statesor by the...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 45The EU wants to see further tradeliberalisation with Russia. There was animportan...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201346RUSSIA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipMoscow wants visa-free trave...
EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 47RUSSIA / Human rights and governanceIn 2012, the EU sharpened its focus onhuman r...
European Union: Foreign Policy
European Union: Foreign Policy
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European Union: Foreign Policy

  1. 1. EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013Justin Vaïsse andSusi Dennisonwith Julien Barnes-Dacey,Dimitar Bechev, AnthonyDworkin, Richard Gowan,Jana Kobzova, HansKundnani, Daniel Levy,Kadri Liik, Jonas Parello-Plesner and Nick Witney
  2. 2. ABOUT ECFRThe European Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR) isthe first pan-European think-tank. Launched in October2007, its objective is to conduct research and promoteinformed debate across Europe on the developmentof coherent, effective and values-based Europeanforeign policy.ECFR has developed a strategy with three distinctiveelements that define its activities:•A pan-European Council. ECFR has brought togethera distinguished Council of over one hundred andseventy Members – politicians, decision makers,thinkers and business people from the EU’s memberstates and candidate countries – which meets oncea year as a full body. Through geographical andthematic task forces, members provide ECFR staff withadvice and feedback on policy ideas and help withECFR’s activities within their own countries. The Councilis chaired by Martti Ahtisaari, Joschka Fischer andMabel van Oranje.• A physical presence in the main EU memberstates. ECFR, uniquely among European think-tanks,has offices in Berlin, London, Madrid, Paris, Rome,Sofia and Warsaw. In the future ECFR plans to openan office in Brussels. Our offices are platforms forresearch, debate, advocacy and communications.• A distinctive research and policy developmentprocess. ECFR has brought together a team ofdistinguished researchers and practitioners fromall over Europe to advance its objectives throughinnovative projects with a pan-European focus.ECFR’s activities include primary research, publicationof policy reports, private meetings and publicdebates, ‘friends of ECFR’ gatherings in EU capitalsand outreach to strategic media outlets.ECFR is backed by the Soros Foundations Network,the Spanish foundation FRIDE (La Fundación paralas Relaciones Internacionales y el Diálogo Exterior),the Bulgarian Communitas Foundation, the ItalianUniCredit group, the Stiftung Mercator and StevenHeinz. ECFR works in partnership with otherorganisations but does not make grants to individualsor institutions.
  3. 3. EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013
  4. 4. Copyright of this publication is held by the European Councilon Foreign Relations. You may not copy, reproduce, republishor circulate in any way the content from this publicationexcept for your own personal and non-commercial use.Any other use requires the prior written permission of theEuropean Council on Foreign Relations.© ECFR January 2013.Published by theEuropean Council on Foreign Relations (ECFR)35 Old Queen StreetLondon SW1H 9JAlondon@ecfr.euISBN: 978-1-906538-73-6
  5. 5. EUROPEANFOREIGN POLICYSCORECARD2013STEERING GROUPVaira Vike-Freiberga and António Vitorino (co-chairs)Lluís Bassets, Charles Clarke, Robert Cooper, Teresa Gouveia, Heather Grabbe,Jean-Marie Guéhenno, István Gyamarti, Jaap de Hoop Scheffer, Wolfgang Ischinger,Sylvie Kauffmann, Gerald Knaus, Nils Muiznieks, Kalypso Nicolaïdis, RuprechtPolenz, Albert Rohan, Nicolò Russo Perez, Klaus Scharioth, Aleksander Smolar,Paweł S’wieboda, Teija TiilikainenECFR DIRECTORMark LeonardECFR RESEARCH TEAMJustin Vaïsse and Susi Dennison (project leaders)Hans Kundnani (editor)Jonas Parello-Plesner (China), Jana Kobzova and Kadri Liik (Russia), Justin Vaïsse(United States), Dimitar Bechev and Jana Kobzova (Wider Europe), Susi Dennison,Julien Barnes-Dacey, Anthony Dworkin, Daniel Levy and Nick Witney (Middle Eastand North Africa), Richard Gowan (Multilateral Issues and Crisis Management).RESEARCHERS IN MEMBER STATESVerena Knaus (Austria), Hans Diels (Belgium), Antonia Doncheva and MarinLessinski (Bulgaria), Philippos Savvides (Cyprus), David Kral (Czech Republic),Emma Knudsen (Denmark), Andres Kasekamp (Estonia), Teemu Rantanen(Finland), Olivier de France (France), Olaf Boehnke and Felix Mengel (Germany),George Tzogopoulos (Greece), Zsuzsanna Végh (Hungary), Ben Tonra (Ireland),Greta Galeazzi (Italy), Inese Loce (Latvia), Vytis Jurkonis (Lithuania), HansDiels (Luxemburg), Cetta Mainwaring (Malta), Paul and Saskia van Genugten(Netherlands), Marcin Terlikowski (Poland), Lívia Franco (Portugal), IrinaAngelescu (Romania), Sabina Kajncˇ (Slovenia), Teodor Gyelník (Slovakia), LaiaMestres (Spain), Jan Joel Andersson (Sweden), Catarina Tulley (United Kingdom).
  6. 6. AcknowledgementsThe authors would above all like to thank the Steering Group fortheir advice and input, which has been an enormous help. Numerousother policymakers, analysts, and specialists gave input to specificcomponents and greatly contributed to the Scorecard’s depth andaccuracy. In particular, Christina Markus Lassen commented on thesection on the Middle East and North Africa. However, any mistakesin the text are the responsibility of the authors.Numerous members of ECFR staff helped in various ways, especiallyJanek Lasocki, who coordinated the project and kept it on track.Once again Lorenzo Marini did a brilliant job in developing andmanaging the Scorecard website. Niall Finn and Madeline Storckhelped with research.At the Brookings Institution, Antonia Doncheva worked tirelesslyto coordinate the research of the 27 researchers in the memberstates, manage tables and grades, compile dates, and check facts andfigures, with great professionalism. Clara O’Donnell, Steven Pifer,and Domenico Lombardi at Brookings provided very valuable input.Richard Gowan would also like to thank Edward Burke.
  7. 7. Foreword 6Preface 7Introduction 9Chapter 1: China 24Chapter 2: Russia 40Chapter 3: United States 58Chapter 4: Wider Europe 75Chapter 5: Middle Eastand North Africa 92Chapter 6: Multilateral Issuesand Crisis Management 109Scores and Grades 129(complete tables) Classification of Member States 134(complete tables) Abbreviations 140 About the authors 141Contents
  8. 8. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 20136ForewordThe Compagnia di San Paolo is one of the largest independent foundationsin Europe and one of the main private funders of research in the fields of EUaffairs and international relations. Over the past few years, the Compagniahas progressively consolidated its profile in these fields, signing strategicpartnership agreements with institutions such as the German Marshall Fundof the United States and the Istituto Affari Internazionali. Our overall goal is tofoster a truly European debate on the main issues the EU faces and to encouragethe emergence of a European political space.In these fields, the Compagnia is also a founding member of an initiative ofregional Cooperation, the European Fund for the Balkans, set up with threeother European foundations – the Robert Bosch Stiftung, the King BaudouinFoundation and the ERSTE Stiftung – with the aim of contributing to theimprovement of the administration of the countries of the Western Balkans,with a view to their integration in the EU.It is against this background, and as part of the Compagnia’s commitmentto support research on the European integration process, that we continuedthe cooperation with the European Council on Foreign Relations on the thirdedition of the European Foreign Policy Scorecard. We highly appreciate thiscooperation with ECFR and we sincerely hope that this project will intensify thedialogue among various European stakeholders – both institutional and fromcivil society – with the goal of strengthening our understanding of Europe’s roleas a global player.Piero GastaldoSecretary GeneralCompagnia di San Paolo
  9. 9. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 7It is a pleasure for us to present the 2013 edition of the European Foreign PolicyScorecard, an ECFR initiative that aims to achieve an overall evaluation of theforeign-policy effectiveness of the EU during the course of the past year. Wewere particularly pleased to note that EU foreign policy was reasonably resilientin 2012 as the EU itself appeared to emerge from its period of crisis.The Scorecard is now in its third year and, as such, it is becoming an importanttool for tracking trends in the development of European foreign policy. Wetherefore put emphasis on continuity in the methodology in order to enablemeaningful comparison between European foreign-policy performance in 2012and in the previous two years.As in the first two years of the Scorecard, we assessed the collective performanceof all EU actors, rather than looking at the action of any particular institutionor member state. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of Europe as a globalactor, we focused on policies and results rather than on institutional processes.We assigned two scores – “unity” and “resources”, each graded out of 5 – forEuropean policies themselves, and a third score – “outcome”, graded out of10 – for results. The sum of these scores was then translated into a letter grade.We also continued to evaluate the role played by individual member states on30 out of the 80 components of European foreign policy in which they played aparticularly significant role. With the help of researchers in the 27 EU memberstates, we classified each member state into three nominal categories as beingeither a “leader”, a “supporter”, or a “slacker” in each of these 30 components.Such a categorisation obviously involves a political judgment. However, we havestrived to continue refining the process this year by explaining the reasoningthat led to the assigning of each category.Preface
  10. 10. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 20138One of the key developments in European foreign policy in the last three yearswas the creation of the European External Action Service (EEAS). Now fullyoperational, the EEAS has become a significant actor, not only in coordinationand policymaking in Brussels, but also in EU delegations around the world.Given that the EEAS will be officially reviewed in 2013, and also in view of thesignificant impact that it now has on the implementation of foreign policy in theEU, we also undertook to examine its performance in detail alongside that ofthe other EU institutions and the member states. In particular, we tried to showwhere it was active and in what way. As the authors discuss in the introduction,a complex picture emerges of EEAS activity on different types of policy and indifferent regions.A full description of the Scorecard methodology can be found on ECFR’swebsite at http://www.ecfr.eu/scorecard. However, we would like to reiteratethat the Scorecard project will continue to evolve as the EU itself evolves, andwe therefore welcome your views and feedback on the way in which it assessesEuropean foreign-policy performance, as well the findings in this year’s edition.Vaira Vike-Freiberga and António VitorinoJanuary 2013
  11. 11. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 9IntroductionIn the introduction to the first edition of the Scorecard, we wrote that in 2010Europe had been distracted by the euro crisis. In the introduction to the secondedition, we wrote that in 2011 Europe had been diminished by the crisis. By theend of 2012, the crisis had become less acute but still not been solved – far fromit. In fact, for the third year in a row, European leaders continued to devotemore time to worrying about Europe’s financial health than its geopolitical role.Europe’s image and soft power continued to fade around the world (though thisis difficult to quantify), while its resources for defence and international affairskept eroding. But European foreign policy did not unravel in 2012. In fact, the EUmanaged to preserve the essence of its acquis diplomatique as the EEAS, whichdid not even exist two years earlier, continued to develop and consolidate its role.The Scorecard’s granular assessment of European foreign-policy performancein 2012 shows timid signs of stabilisation and resilience. Across the range ofissues that the Scorecard assesses, Europeans generally performed better thanthe previous year (see Figure 1). Europe improved its score in relation to Russia(from C+ to B-) and to China (from C to C+), and continued to perform solidly inother areas (United States (B-) and Multilateral issues (B), and adequately in theWider Europe (C+) and the Middle East and North Africa (C+). Thus, althoughthe EU had no high-profile successes comparable to the military interventionin Libya in 2011, it put in a respectable performance in its external relations –especially given the deep crisis with which it continued to struggle. In particular,it seemed to perform better when it continued to implement policies for whichthe foundations had been laid in previous years.Clearly, whether the EU can turn a positive year against the odds into an upwardtrendinforeign-policyperformancewilldependtoalargeextentonwhetheritcanovercome the crisis and restore growth and therefore increase its economic power.In that sense, European leaders are right to focus on solving the crisis even at the
  12. 12. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201310expense of a focus on foreign-policy issues. But it will also depend on whetherEuropeans can overcome their internal divisions and improve coordination andcoherence in foreign policy. In particular, it will depend on whether Europe canturn the EEAS into an effective diplomatic service as envisaged in the LisbonTreaty that is able to convert the EU’s huge resources into power.The eurozone, the EU, and the neighbourhoodIn 2012, the eurozone was stabilised. In June, following an inconclusiveelection a month earlier, the Greek people elected Antonis Samaras as primeminister. Mario Draghi showed bold leadership after he succeeded Jean-ClaudeTrichet as ECB president at the end of 2011. The new Long-Term RefinancingOperation (LTRO) programme he launched as soon as he took over – in effect,an injection of liquidity to European banks – went a long way to reassuringmarkets about their solvency. The Outright Monetary Transactions (OMT)programme he initiated in the summer – a promise by the ECB to step in andbuy unlimited quantities of certain bonds on the secondary market – turned theECB into the kind of lender of last resort for which many in Europe and beyondhad been calling. In late June, European leaders also agreed on the creation ofa banking union, which they confirmed in December – a further positive step in2012 2011 2010Score /20 Grade Score /20 Grade Score /20 GradeRelations with China 9.7 C+ 8.5 C 9 C+Relations with Russia 11 B- 10 C+ 9.5 C+Relations with theUnited States11.7 B- 11 B- 11 B-Relations withWider Europe10.3 C+ 9.5 C+ 9.5 C+Relations with the MiddleEast and North Africa10.3 C+ 10 C+ – –Multilateral issues andcrisis management12.6 B 13 B 14/11 B+ / B-Figure 1European Performance on the six issues in 2012
  13. 13. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 11guaranteeing European banks. Thus the crisis became less acute in the secondhalf of 2012 than it was in 2011.However, while positive, these steps taken in 2012 do not yet go far enough tosolve the crisis. As the crisis became less acute, European leaders – includingGerman Chancellor Angela Merkel – seemed to become less determined to createa genuine economic and political union and even watered down proposals fora banking union. Moreover, it is not clear that even the limited steps that theeurozone has taken are sustainable. In particular, while OMT was seen as abreakthrough by many in Europe and elsewhere in the world, it was seen as adefeat in Germany. Since the June summit, there has been a backlash, expressedmost powerfully by Bundesbank President Jens Weidmann, who even implicitlycompared Draghi to the devil in a remarkable speech in Frankfurt in September.Germany may now have reached the limits of debt mutualisation under itsexisting constitution. In order to move further towards economic and politicalunion, as the eurozone must, a referendum may be needed in Germany as wellas in other member states. The steps taken in 2012 to stabilise the euro crisismay therefore have produced a temporary respite, with further turmoil to come,rather than a lasting solution to the crisis.Furthermore, in the process of stabilising the eurozone in 2012, the EU itselfnow faces difficult questions. A three-tier Europe consisting of the inner coreof the eurozone, pre-ins such as Poland, and outs such as the UK is emergingfrom the crisis. This raises huge institutional questions for the EU, which maytake years and require treaty change to resolve, though European leaders areunderstandably reluctant to create the further uncertainty that would involve. Inaddition, a British withdrawal from the EU looks increasingly possible. If 2011was the year of the “German question” – that is, the debate about Germany’srole in and commitment to the EU – 2012 was the year that the “British question”emerged. Whether or not the UK decides to leave the EU – a step that we thinkwould be disastrous for both Britain itself and for the EU as a whole – theemergence of a three-tier Europe will have huge consequences for the singlemarket and for European foreign policy.Meanwhile, as Europe struggled with these complex problems, its neighbourhoodalso remained challenging in 2012. Though an Israeli military strike against Irandid not materialise ahead of the US presidential election in November, thereremains the possibility of such a strike in 2013. The conflict in Syria became thefocal point of a broader regional struggle for influence along a sectarian Shia–Sunni faultline. In November, as tensions with Gaza increased, Israel launched
  14. 14. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201312Operation Pillar of Defence. Meanwhile, the transitions in post-revolutionaryNorth Africa remained fragile and renewed protests late in the year in Egyptforced President Mohammed Morsi to annul a decree granting himself newpowers ahead of a constitutional vote. Although enlargement continued asCroatia was set to become the twenty-eighth member of the EU and Serbiabecame a candidate, the environment in Europe’s eastern neighbourhood wasdifficult, especially in the Western Balkans.A surprisingly good yearHowever, against this background of a challenging internal and externalenvironment, Europe performed surprisingly well in its foreign policy in 2012.Russia was a case in point. Relations with Moscow deteriorated, but Europe’sunity and the coherence of its policies towards Russia improved. The EU did notdepart from its cooperative attitude, having been instrumental in getting Russiainto the WTO, which it formally joined in August. But it was more attentiveto protecting its interests and norms, and more assertive – threatening, forexample, to use the WTO dispute-settlement system when Moscow announcednew protectionist measures in late 2012. The European Commission launchedan antitrust probe against Gazprom, while continuing to orchestrate efforts atenhancing gas interconnections so as to decrease Europe’s energy dependencyon Moscow. Europeans did not shy away from criticising human-rights abusesduring the crackdown on demonstrations that accompanied the election seasonand the re-election of Vladimir Putin as president in March.TherewerealsosignsofmodestimprovementinrelationswithChina,eventhoughunityamongmemberstatescontinuedtobeinshortsupply,therebyunderminingEuropean leverage. Germany, which accounts for nearly half of European exportsto China, seemed at times to speak for Europe in China. But even if Berlin doesnot want to replace the EU, its voice is naturally louder than others, and Beijinghas become adept at cultivating it. In some respects, Germany was a leader onChina in 2012, but Merkel also undermined the European Commission whenit launched an anti-dumping case against Chinese solar-panel manufacturers.Still, Europeans in general became more assertive overall in their trade disputeswith Beijing and in their criticism of human-rights violations. The panickedapproach of 2011, when Europe was both hoping for and fearing massive Chineseinvestment in the continent to relieve the euro crisis, was replaced by a morerestrained and balanced relationship.
  15. 15. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 13Europeans also slightly improved their performance on the United States,especially in their cooperation with Washington on regional and global issues,which helped them further their own goals while having the US respect theirred lines – for example, in sanctions on Iran. Finally, the only issue on whichEurope performed worse in 2012 than in 2011 was multilateral issues and crisismanagement (the overall score out of 20 went down from 13 to 12.5, or a B). NewCSDP missions were launched – something that had not happened in the lasttwo years – and European policy towards Somalia grew more coherent. But theEU was rebuffed by Russia and China in the UNSC with two vetoes on Syria andby the United States on the arms-trade treaty; they failed to make an impact onthe UN vote on Palestine; and the G20 was still dominated by the euro crisis asin 2011.In the eastern neighbourhood, European performance was mixed. EuropeanscontinuedtostruggleintheWesternBalkansin2012(B,thesamegradeasin2011),with political instability and economic difficulties from Bosnia and Herzegovinato Serbia and Montenegro, although the EEAS managed to make good progresson relations between Serbia and Kosovo. The EU also got mixed results in theEastern Partnership countries (C+). Its results were good in Moldova, and tosome extent in Georgia, and it had a firm, coherent approach towards Belarus,but Europeans struggled to pursue a united approach to Azerbaijan and Ukraine.Lastly, Europeans continued to struggle on Turkey (C), with a muddled situationon bilateral relations and frustrating developments on foreign policy.Europe’s southern neighbourhood was dominated by the conflict in Syria.Europeans could not break the frustrating diplomatic gridlock or prevent thebloody tragedy that worsened as the year went on. Europe’s overall performancein the region remained fairly constant (the overall score was 10.1 last year and10.3 this year, or a C+). Member states were generally united in their initiativestowards Iran and North Africa but, beset by the economic crisis, they couldn’tmove beyond limited programmatic support to the transitions and struggled tomake a positive political impact with governments and to construct collectiverelations with newly politically engaged parts of society in the region. Theywere still split on the Israeli–Palestinian issue, though to a lesser degree thanin previous years, as demonstrated by the November UNGA vote on upgradingPalestinian membership.WegaveEuropefourAgrades–thesamenumberaslastyear–foritsperformanceon specific components of European foreign policy (see Figure 2). Overall, itappears that, where the EU made progress in 2012 – in particular, in regions
  16. 16. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201314Unity Resources Outcome Total Grade37 Relations with the US on Iranand weapons proliferation 4 5 8 17 A-35 Relations with the US on theSyrian conflict4 4 8 16 A-41 Kosovo 4 4 8 16 A-48 Relations with the EasternNeighbourhood on trade4 5 7 16 A-12 Relations with China on climatechange4 5 6 15 B+27 Relations with the US on tradeand investment4 4 7 15 B+55 Tunisia 4 4 7 15 B+69 European policy on human rightsat the UN4 4 7 15 B+74 Drought in the Sahel 4 4 7 15 B+78 Somalia 4 4 7 15 B+13 Trade liberalisation with Russia 5 4 5 14 B+33 Relations with the US on theArab transitions4 4 6 14 B+39 Overall progress of enlargement inthe Western Balkans4 4 6 14 B+60 Lebanon 4 3 7 14 B+70 European policy on the ICC andinternational tribunals4 3 7 14 B+Figure 2Most successful policies in 2012
  17. 17. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 15Unity Resources Outcome Total Grade54 Security sector reform2 1 2 5 D+11 Relations with China on reformingglobal governance2 2 2 6 C-7 Relations with China on theDalai Lama and Tibet2 3 2 7 C-26 Reciprocity on visa procedureswith the US2 2 3 7 C-34 Relations with the US on theMiddle East Peace Process2 3 2 7 C-43 Bilateral relations with Turkey 3 2 2 7 C-44 Rule of law, democracy andhuman rights in Turkey3 2 2 7 C-45 Relations with Turkey on theCyprus question3 2 2 7 C-58 Algeria and Morocco 2 2 3 7 C-66 UN reform 2 2 3 7 C-Figure 3Least successful policies in 2012
  18. 18. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201316Figure 4European performance on cross-cutting themesCross-Cutting Themes* in 2012 Scoreout of 20Grade 2011 2010Trade liberalisation, standardsand norms - “low politics”14 B+ 12.5 B 13 BIran and proliferation 13 B 13 B 16 A-Energy policy 12.5 B 12 B- 10 C+Relations with Asia 12.5 B n/a n/aClimate change 12 B 14 B+ 12 B-Balkans 12 B- 13 B 12 B-Afghanistan 12 B- 10 C+ 10 C+Issues of war and peace -“high politics”12 B- 11 B- 11 B-Arab transitions 11 B- 12 B- n/aVisa policy 10 C+ 10 C+ 12 B-Euro crisis 10 C+ 8.5 C n/aIsrael/Palestine 10 C+ 8.5 C 9 C+Protracted conflicts 9.5 C+ 8 C 10 C+Human rights 9 C+ 9 C+ 8 CRelations with Turkey 8 C n/a n/a* The cross-cutting themes in 2012 are the following:“Climate Change” combines components 12, 24, 38, 71.“Iran and proliferation” combines components 8, 22, 37, 63, 67.“Trade liberalisation, standards and norms” combines components 2, 3, 4, 13, 27, 28, 48, 68.“Balkans” combines 32, 39, 40, 41, 42. “Arab transitions” combines 23, 33, 35, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 64, 75. “Issues of war and peace” combines 8, 19, 22, 23, 30, 31, 32 , 33, 34, 35, 37, 41, 42, 51, 55, 56, 57, 59,62, 63, 67, 75,76, 77, 78, 79.“Energy policy” combines 20, 21, 46, 49. “Visa policy” combines 14, 26, 50. “Israel/Palestine” combines 23, 34, 62. “Human rights” combines 6, 7, 15, 16, 17, 40, 44, 47, 52, 69, 70. “Euro crisis” combines 5, 29, 65. “Afghanistan” combines 23, 79. “Protracted conflicts” combines 19, 51. “Relations with Asia” combines 9, 36.“Turkey”combines 43, 44, 45, 46.
  19. 19. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 17such as China and Russia, on enlargement in its neighbourhood, and on the E3+3process with Iran – it was where a policy had been developed in previous yearsand member states worked together with the EU institutions to implement it. Inthese cases, there was less need for innovation than in some other cases such asSyria, but a strong demand for member-state unity behind a pre-agreed strategy.On these types of areas, the euro crisis did not seem to undermine Europeanperformance.An analysis of European performance on “cross-cutting themes” (see Figure 4)illustrates the type of issues on which Europeans did well in 2012 and those onwhich they did less well. It appears that Europeans tended to do well in thosecomponents of foreign policy in which the EEAS or the European Commissionplays a strong coordinating role, for example on trade issues, in negotiationswith Iran, and in the Balkans. However, this pattern should not be overstated:Europeans also performed relatively well in 2012 on components relating to theeuro crisis and Afghanistan – issues on which member states are to a large extentin the lead.The big three and “coalitions of the willing”In the last edition of the Scorecard, we identified a trend towards the“renationalisation” of European foreign policy in 2011. Perhaps the most strikingfinding in our categorisation of member states in 2012 was the drop in theleadership by the big three: Germany, France, and the UK. In 2011, Germanyled Europe in 19 components of European foreign policy, France in 18, andthe UK in 17. In 2012, Germany led only 12 times, and France and the UK 11times (see Figure 5). In 2011, Sweden also emerged as one of the most frequentleaders in European foreign policy, particularly on multilateral issues and crisismanagement. Although in 2012 it led on 10 components of European foreignpolicy compared to 11 in 2011, this time that made it almost as much of a leaderas the big three. Like France and Germany, Sweden was categorised as a leader inat least one aspect of each of the chapters of the Scorecard, which indicates thatit is engaged across the spectrum of European foreign policy and not simply inregions of specific interest. The Netherlands also punched above its weight.In 2012, the UK’s relationship with the EU made headlines as Euroscepticsentiment within the UK grew and a withdrawal from the EU became a realpossibility. Prime Minister David Cameron came under increasing pressure fromthe UK Independence Party (UKIP) and, at the beginning of 2013, promised
  20. 20. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201318an “in/out” referendum on British membership of the EU by 2018. However,the Scorecard shows that, even as it was marginalised within the EU, the UKcontinued to play a constructive role in European foreign policy – often byexample-setting. In particular, the UK played a leading role in the UN context –for example, in the debates on a post-Millennium Development Goals frameworkfor development aid – and in smaller coalitions such as the E3+3 process on Iran.Even where it did not lead, it was broadly supportive of the development of EUforeign policymaking, and was a “slacker” only once in 2012 (on an EU–Chinainvestment treaty to enable reciprocity in access to public procurement).Figure 5“Leaders” and “slackers” among EU member statesLEADERSOn no. ofcomponents SLACKERSOn no. ofcomponentsGermany 12 Greece 5France 11 Latvia 5United Kingdom 11 Romania 5Sweden 10 Spain 5Netherlands 8 Lithuania 4Poland 5 Portugal 4Czech Republic 4 Cyprus 3Denmark 4 Slovenia 3Finland 4 Austria 2Ireland 4 Bulgaria 2Austria 3 Czech Republic 2Belgium 3 Estonia 2Estonia 3 France 2Italy 3 Germany 2Bulgaria 2 Italy 2Hungary 2 Malta 2Luxembourg 2 Belgium 1Spain 2 Denmark 1Latvia 1 Hungary 1Lithuania 1 Luxembourg 1Romania 1 Netherlands 1Slovakia 1 Poland 1Cyprus 0 Slovakia 1Greece 0 United Kingdom 1Malta 0 Finland 0Portugal 0 Ireland 0Slovenia 0 Sweden 0
  21. 21. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 19Of the big three member states, France underwent the most obvious changein 2012 after François Hollande took over from Nicolas Sarkozy as president.In some areas, such as a reframing of the relationship with “Françafrique” inpolitical terms, there was a conscious effort to mark a departure from theprevious administration’s policy. In particular, the Hollande governmentwas much more active in the second half of the year in efforts to gatherinternational support for an African-led intervention in northern Mali and,as the French military intervention in Mali in January 2013 showed, this willclearly continue to be a priority as the year progresses. On other issues, suchas the early indication of support for the Palestinian bid for observer statusat the UNGA in November, the new government followed a similar line to itspredecessor. France and the UK have both played leading roles in developingcontacts with and supporting the Syrian opposition, although this does notappear to have been closely coordinated either with each other or with otherEU partners.Within Europe, the political affinity between Merkel and Sarkozy was replacedby a more difficult Hollande–Merkel relationship. Together with Italian PrimeMinister Mario Monti and Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, Hollandepushed for greater emphasis on growth in solutions to tackle the euro crisis. Asa result, Merkel sometimes found herself in a minority in the eurozone in 2012– something that had not happened in 2011. Germany was also criticised onforeign policy – in particular in relation to the emerging “special relationship”between China and Germany. However, Germany also frequently led Europe inforeign policy – in particular through a new assertive approach towards Russia.Overall, Germany was again the most prolific leader in European foreign policy.It led on 12 components, often by taking initiative, and was also often an activesupporter – that is, a cheerleader rather than a bystander.However, what is clear from the Scorecard’s findings is that the Franco-Germanaxis did not operate as a central driver for foreign-policy initiatives in 2012.With the exceptions of the E3+3 process on Iran and efforts to persuade Russiato take a tougher line on Syria at the UN (both of which were part of moreformal processes), none of the significant smaller “coalitions of the willing”in European foreign policy this year included both Germany and France asleaders. Where Germany and France did work together as leaders, usually aspart of much broader coalitions, this was often as sponsors, for example ontackling the food crisis and drought in the Sahel and on financial support to theMENA region, rather than as initiative takers.
  22. 22. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201320However, there was also a drop in the number of “slackers”, which suggeststhat member states were not quite as disruptive of coherent collective actionas they were in 2011. The top “slackers” were Greece (which we identified asa “slacker” two times less than in 2011), Latvia (once more than in 2011), andRomania and Spain (the same number of times as in 2011). Cyprus (whichheld the rotating presidency in the second half of 2011), Italy, and Poland were“slackers” four times less than last year. (In the case of Italy, this suggests thatMonti and his foreign minister, Giulio Terzi, were successful in re-launchingItaly’s international engagement.) This trend towards greater cooperation isparticularly clear on Russia, where we found no “slackers” (and in fact very fewleaders apart from Germany). In other words, member states did not investheavily but were supportive of the overall EU effort.The challenge for the EEAS: technocratic Europeand power EuropeWhether the trend towards the renationalisation of European foreign policythat began with the euro crisis will continue in the years ahead will dependin part on whether the overall machinery of European foreign policy becomesmore efficient – in other words, to what extent Europeans are able to apply thevarious instruments that they have at their disposal. In particular, it was hopedthat the Lisbon Treaty and the creation of the EEAS would help Europe becomemore effective in bringing together in a coherent way the economic, diplomatic,and military resources of the member states on classical foreign-policy issuesand the external competences of the European Commission on issues such astrade and aid. Reconciling these two Europes that interact with the world – the“technocratic Europe” and the “power Europe” – is the main challenge for theEEAS. The official review of its development that will be carried out in 2013will offer an opportunity to test its record in this regard.As the Scorecard illustrates, the EEAS plays very different roles in differentpolicy areas. It interacts with national diplomacies in various ways, from fullresponsibility to shared competence or sometimes marginalisation – usuallyhigh-level UN diplomacy or military crises such as Libya in 2011 or Syria in2012. But the EEAS can also support the big member states, for example bydirectly negotiating with Iranians on the nuclear issue. It can help deliverstrong European policies, for example by helping to convince reluctantmember states to diversify their energy supplies in preparation for sanctions
  23. 23. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 21against Iran or by minimising disagreement in order to avoid paralysis, asin the Kosovo–Serbia negotiations (five EU member states do not recogniseKosovo). It can powerfully represent Europe’s collective decisions, as it didwith the opening of an office in Burma in 2012 – a prelude to the opening of afull-fledged EU delegation in 2013.In other cases, the EEAS is able to be more assertive in exercising EU leverage,for example in visa policy towards Russia and the Western Balkans. It can alsotake initiative independently of, but coordinated with, national diplomacies, asit has done in developing policy towards and organising financial support forthe transition states in North Africa and coordinating it with the United States.But for all the progress on this front, European foreign policy still functionsmost effectively when there are engines – often the EU3 or “coalitions of thewilling” including other member states such as Italy, the Netherlands, Spain,Sweden, and Poland. The role the EEAS plays is also different in differentparts of the world: in Washington, the EU delegation finds itself working withmore powerful and often much larger embassies from all 27 member states;in countries where the EU gives out large amounts of aid, the EU delegation isoften de facto the most important Western diplomatic representation.Thus assessing the performance of the EEAS is a complex task. The Scorecardsuggests that, after a difficult first two years marked by high expectations, theeuro crisis, and the Arab Awakening, the EEAS began to function better in 2012,although it is far from having reached its full potential. It is undoubtedly stillpreoccupied by organisational problems, Indeed, one of the main objectivesthat High Representative Catherine Ashton has given herself is to establish afull-fledged and functioning diplomatic corps during the course of her five-yearterm in office. But the EEAS is structurally slowed down by the fundamentalimperative of coordination between the 27 member states, which imposes aheavy constraint on its agility (even when it succeeds). Whether in Brussels orin the major EU delegations, the EEAS is all about coordination, while moderndiplomacy in the digital age requires ever-greater responsiveness and velocity.Within these constraints, the diplomatic culture of the EEAS seemsgradually to be changing for the better. Initially, it was mostly staffed byEU civil servants working for the European Commission, with a culture ofimplementing programmes and managing only certain issues such as tradeand the environment. However, the substantial infusion of diplomats frommember states has brought a culture of power relations, emergency, andcrisis management – in short, a diplomatic culture. As a result, relations with
  24. 24. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201322member states, including between EU delegations and embassies across theworld, have improved markedly. A positive change in attitudes towards theEEAS in the large machineries of the biggest member states is also taking placeas diplomats realise they will have to serve in it at some point in their careers.The Scorecard suggests that the lack of a consensus among member states doesnot necessarily prevent the EEAS from playing a useful role on a given issue,even if it means that it must play a different and reduced role than it can whenthere is consensus. But the danger is that the “technocratic Europe”, largelyled by the European Commission, will be increasingly cut off from the “powerEurope” of member states. In the Middle East and North Africa, EU task forceswere created to help bridge this gap. Unfortunately, a lack of clarity across theEUabouttheobjectives of this policy tool meant that,whiletheyweresuccessfulas investment conferences and in developing lines of communication withbroader sections of society than classic government-to-government relationsallowed, they did not succeed as an EU initiative to support political reform incountries such as Egypt, Jordan, and Tunisia.As the EEAS develops and feels more confident that it has the backing ofthe member states’ diplomatic services, it may begin to innovate more anddevelop effective mechanisms, diplomatic practices, and policy itself. Therewere some examples of this in 2012, such as the joint visits by the Bulgarian,Polish, and Swedish foreign ministers to Lebanon and Iraq, and the inclusionof an EEAS representative in the Danish foreign ministry’s team for a visitby a senior Chinese delegation. Spanish diplomats were also housed by theEU delegation in Syria and Yemen after the Spanish embassies were closedand the EEAS represented Bulgarian citizens sentenced to death in Malaysiain October. However, many member states are still expanding their bilateralrepresentation and continue to take the EU presidency very seriously. Whilethe EEAS became a much more significant actor in 2012, member states area long way from investing in it to the extent that it is able to realise the fullpotential range of roles that it could play and from reconciling “technocraticEurope” and “power Europe”.
  25. 25. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 23Internal and external challengesTThe near horizon is marked by serious challenges – any one of which couldundermine the modest recovery in European foreign-policy performance in 2012.There are already indications from key strategic partners that they are beginningto see the euro crisis as the “new normal” – in other words, that they are planningfor a future in which European power continues to decrease. Europe’s lack of acollective defence strategy, and its declining investment in its defence capacity,is also a serious obstacle to continuing global influence as a security actor. Thismakes it even more important that the EEAS is able to bring together CSDP withwider foreign-policy efforts. These matters are daunting enough with the EU’scurrent structure. But the impact of a British withdrawal from the EU on theseand numerous other questions would be potentially huge.Europe will also have to deal with these challenges at a time when the UnitedStates is increasingly becoming what Michael Mandelbaum has called a “frugalsuperpower” and is “pivoting” towards Asia. In January 2012, President BarackObama outlined a new defence strategy based on the idea of a “leaner” militaryand a shift of focus towards Asia. In the future, as this strategic rebalancingbecomes a reality, the US presence in Europe’s eastern neighbourhood maybecome more intermittent and low-cost. As it supplies its own energy needs, itmay also have less of an automatic interest in the southern neighbourhood andaim instead to “lead from behind” in the Middle East. Although the US will notleave Europe altogether – in particular, Iran and Syria may continue to pull theUS back in 2013 – it is likely to work with others as well as Europeans as part ofwhat Secretary of State Hillary Clinton has called a “multi-partner” strategy.This long-term shift in US foreign policy will further increase the pressure onEurope to deal with its own neighbourhood. Although the EU has become moreeffective towards Russia this year, tensions have, if anything, grown and maycontinue to do so in 2013. Insecurity in the Sahel, which was already a growingconcern in 2012, has in the first month of 2013 led one EU member state to go towar in a region not far off the EU’s doorstep. Europeans are likely to be dealingwith the fallout of the attempted takeover of Mali by Islamist rebel groups thistime next year and feeling the consequences for years to come. Despite the eurocrisis, the EU foreign policymaking machine has continued to function in 2012and indeed has been moderately successful. But getting by for a second year isunlikely to be enough to deal with the challenges that 2013 looks set to present.
  26. 26. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201324ChinaC+Overall gradeOverall grade 2011 COverall grade 2010 C+
  27. 27. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 25 2012 2011 2010TRADE LIBERALISATION AND OVERALL RELATIONSHIP C+ C+ B-1 Formats of the Europe-China dialogue B- C+ C+ 2 Investment and market access in China B- B- B- 3 Reciprocity in access to public procurement C C C+ in Europe and China4 Trade disputes with China B B- B- 5 Cooperation with China on the euro crisis C C- n/aHUMAN RIGHTS AND GOVERNANCE C D+ C-6 Rule of law and human rights in China C D+ D+7 Relations with China on the Dalai Lama and Tibet C- D+ D+COOPERATION ON REGIONAL AND GLOBAL ISSUES B- B- C+8 Relations with China on Iran and proliferation B- B- B+9 Relations with China in Asia B n/a n/a10 Relations with China on Africa B- B- C+11 Relations with China on reforming global governance C- C- C-12 Relations with China on climate change B+ B+ B2012 was a year of change in China as the new generation of leaders, headedby Xi Jinping, who will run China for the next five years, took over. The newnumber two, Li Keqiang, is widely viewed as a reformer and his pet project onsustainable urbanisation has already been identified by the EU institutions as anew area of cooperation. But, on most other issues, the new leaders are likely tobe as intransigent as ever. Meanwhile, Europe was forced to think about how itshould respond to the US “pivot” to Asia and what its response would mean for itsrelationship with what will likely become the world’s largest economy in the nextdecade. Should it support the US, engage more in Asia as an independent actor, orstay out of Asian security issues altogether?Notwithstanding High Representative Catherine Ashton’s visits to Asia in themiddle of the year – what she called her “Asian Semester” – Europe seemed to beuncertain on how it could play a role in Asian security or even to react coherentlyto the pivot. During the Asia–Europe Meeting (ASEM), EU member states stayedominously silent on the maritime disputes between China and its neighbours.At the ASEAN Regional Forum in July, Ashton and her American counterpart,
  28. 28. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201326Hillary Clinton, issued a joint statement on coordinating Asia policy, but this wentunnoticed by the Chinese and other Asians. Nor, so far, has the statement becomethe blueprint for a more strategic approach to Asia even within the EU. Later inthe year, the EU wasn’t invited to or even associated with the East Asia Summit,in which President Barack Obama participated before making a high-profile visitto Burma.Nevertheless, Europeans put in a slightly improved performance than in 2011. In2012,theEUseemedtobeslightlylesspanic-strickeninitsapproachtoChinathanit was in 2011, when it even cancelled the EU–China summit as it dealt with theeuro crisis. Instead of massively diversifying its currency reserves into Europeanbonds, China made a sober but not exactly game-changing contribution to solvingthe euro crisis by contributing to bailouts through the IMF and kept up its publicsupport for the euro. Chinese companies and state institutions continued to seeopportunities to buy up European companies as they had in 2011. But againstthe background of a record $10 billion in Chinese investments in Europe, the EUinched slowly towards starting talks with China on an investment treaty that couldentail a reciprocal deal for protecting Chinese investments while also increasingmarket access for European companies in China.There were two EU–China summits this year but they had little impact as memberstates put much more energy into their bilateral relations. Ireland was the latestmember state to sign a bilateral “strategic partnership” with China. Meanwhile,Central and Eastern European member states led by Poland held their ownregional summit with China, which established an Eastern European secretariatin its foreign ministry that is focused on investment opportunities which includesa soft loan package from Chinese banks that is reminiscent of Chinese practicesin Africa. But the closest bilateral relationship is now with Germany. ChancellorAngela Merkel visited China twice in 2012, including once as part of the so-calledgovernment-to-government consultation in August, the largest official gatheringChina has with a foreign power. In fact, she – rather than the so-called troika –seemed to be the key interlocutor for the Chinese on the euro crisis.In September, there was also uncertainty about whether Merkel was speakingfor Germany or for Europe when she seemed to undermine the EuropeanCommission in its case against China for providing unfair subsidies to its solar-panel manufacturers. Notwithstanding German government fears of a tradewar with China, the European Commission pursued the solar case. But thecommission’s tougher approach means that the Chinese increasingly shun theEU’s powerful trade negotiators and instead seek bilateral deals with individual
  29. 29. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 27member states. It is symptomatic of this tendency that the high-level economicdialogue between the EU and China has not been held since December 2010. TheEU postponed its aviation carbon tax scheme but the fight with China on this issueis likely to resume in 2013.ItwasanunimpressiveyearfortheEUinitsattemptstosecureChinesecooperationin the Middle East. In 2011, Europe and the United States persuaded the Chineseto support UNSC Resolution 1970 and 1973 on Libya. But in 2012, in part becauseof China’s perception that the West had exceeded its mandate in Libya, Chinajoined Russia in blocking action against Syria (although China did twice makeindependent suggestions for stabilising the conflict in order to placate the ArabLeague and in particular Saudi Arabia and Qatar, which were disappointed byChina’s veto). By establishing official contacts with the Syrian opposition, Chinais preparing itself for the fall of President Bashar al-Assad, but will still rejectany Western intervention. On Iran, the EU maintained tight diplomatic contactswith China, particularly through Ashton and the EU3 (France, Germany, and theUnited Kingdom), but China nevertheless openly opposed the EU’s sanctions.China was slightly more cooperative in Africa. The Chinese showed pragmatismand cooperated with France in the UNSC and in October gave a green light tointervention in Mali. China’s economic interests in Sudan meant it stayed engagedin the simmering conflict between South and North Sudan, and it even workedwith the EU for clear statements on conflict reduction through the UNSC. Chinaalso indicated a shift towards more civil-society engagement and capacity buildingin Africa rather than just building roads, but this was a response to criticism fromAfrican partners. Thus, although Chinese policy in Africa is changing, this is moredue to local pressure and its larger national interest in conflict mediation than toWestern or European influence.The EEAS delegation in Beijing helped improve European consistency on human-rightsissues.ButingeneraltheshiftawayfromcollectiveEuropeanactiontowardsChina continued as member states pursued their own bilateral strategies, withGermany increasingly the main interlocutor for the Chinese and other memberstates struggling to compete. Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the UKput forward proposals for greater coordination of EU China policy. But whenEuropean leaders took stock of the “strategic partnership” with China in October,the result was simply a reiteration of the need to implement agreements reachedin 2010.
  30. 30. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201328After last year’s EU–China summit waspostponed because of the euro crisis, twosummits took place in 2012. However,both summits were overshadowed bythe bilateral meetings between Germanyand China that immediately precededthem. Following a regional summit led byPoland in April and attended by PremierWen Jiabao, the Chinese foreign ministryalso established a Central and EasternEuropean secretariat under Vice ForeignMinister Song Tao to promote Chinesebusiness interests in the region. The 16+1summit is likely to become an annual event.Chinese premier-in-waiting Li Keqiangmet EU leaders in May. His main priorityis continued reform and sustainableurbanisation, which the EU identifiedas a new area of cooperation in 2012.High Representative Catherine Ashtoncontinued her top-level foreign-policydialogue, which includes the Chinesedefence establishment, but talks on Syriaand Iran produced few results. In July, sheand State Councillor Dai Bingguo issueda joint communiqué that proclaimedthe EU’s “respect for Chinese territorialintegrity and sovereignty”. But it omittedthe urgent need for peaceful resolutionaccording to international law of maritimedisputes in East Asia such as that betweenChina and Japan over the Senkaku/Diaoyuislands, which intensified in 2012.China kept the pivotal high-leveleconomic dialogue on ice in 2012 andthus avoided engagement with theEuropean Commission’s trade negotiators’new approach to public procurement,investment, and reciprocal concessions.Instead, China dealt directly with memberstates, where investment deals werebrokered, and maintained a symbolicengagement policy at the European level.Denmark, the Netherlands, Sweden, andthe UK produced a non-paper on the needfor greater coordination of EU–Chinapolicy. But although the European Councildiscussed the EU’s “strategic partnerships”in October, little strategic action ensued.Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt took a small but innovative step byincluding a high-ranking EEAS official inher delegation when President Hu Jintaovisited during the Danish EU presidency.CHINA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipThe EU positioned itself wellwith the incoming Chineseleadership but Germanywas seen as the go-topartner and business dealswere brokered directly withmember states.01 FORMATS OF THEEUROPE-CHINA DIALOGUE 2010 2011 2012Unity 2/5 2/5 3/5Resources 2/5 2/5 3/5Outcome 5/10 5/10 5/10Total 9/20 9/20 11/20B-2010 C+ 2011 C+
  31. 31. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 29In 2012, Chinese investment in Europe hitanother record of $10 billion. The Chinesewealth fund CIC was behind several largedeals in the UK, including the purchaseof a £600 billion stake in Thames Waterin January and a £450 million stake inHeathrow Airport in November. Afteranother agreement with CIC, the head ofthe Polish investment agency said that“the sky is the limit”. The challenge forEuropeans is to leverage this increase inChinese investment in Europe to improvetheir own access to China’s market. Inparticular, Europeans aim to open up newsectors of the Chinese economy in whichforeign investment is not permitted, suchas finance, services, strategic industrialsectors, and key infrastructure.Since the Lisbon Treaty gave theEuropean Commission competence overinvestment policy, it has taken the lead ona new EU investment treaty to supplantbilateral treaties with China. In 2012, itcompleted an internal assessment and isdue to present its confidential negotiationdirectives to the member states at thebeginning of 2013. China agreed to startnegotiations at the EU–China summitin September. It hopes an investmenttreaty will protect China’s own growinginvestments in Europe. This Chineseinterest is illustrated by the internationalarbitration claim filed in November byChinese insurer Ping An against Belgiumdue to its losses on its investment in theBelgian bank Fortis.The main thing member states can do tosupport the European Commission as itnegotiates the treaty is to reiterate in theirbilateral discussions with China that thetreaty is a top priority. 2013 will show ifmember states will do this as negotiationsstart. However, there still seems tobe some reluctance to get behind theEuropean Commission: the UK still seemsto regret that competence has been movedto the EU level; Germany worries that,despite its greater size and power, the EUmight deliver an investment treaty that isweaker than its own.CHINA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipChinese investmentsin the EU reached newrecords. Negotiations on aninvestment treaty that couldimprove market access forEuropeans inched forward.02 INVESTMENT ANDMARKET ACCESS IN CHINAB-2010 B- 2011 B- 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 4/5 3/5Resources 3/5 3/5 4/5Outcome 5/10 5/10 4/10Total 12/20 12/20 11/20
  32. 32. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201330The EU seeks fair competition and equalaccess to the Chinese market for publicprocurement. European companies rarelywin contracts partly because China has notyetjoinedtheWTO’sAgreementonGeneralProcurement (GPA), which regulatespublic procurement. (In November Chinamade another offer, but it included onlyone-tenth of its real public-procurementmarket.) In March, the EuropeanCommission proposed an instrument onreciprocity in public procurement thatwould potentially exclude bidders fromcountries with less open markets includingChina. In the words of Internal Market andServices Commissioner Michel Barnier, itwas about the EU no longer being “naïve”.In a resolution, the European Parliamentalso came out in favour of strongerreciprocity and better access to Chinesepublic procurement.The proposal is currently being discussedby member states and could end upstalled in internal wrangling for years.Member states are divided and severallarger member states are against. TheUK issued a clear rebuttal stating thatthe proposal would undermine value formoney in public procurement and lead tounnecessary “tit-for-tat protectionism”.And while Chancellor Angela Merkel hadseemed positive about reciprocity in 2010,a leaked document from the Germangovernment similarly foresaw that theproposal heralded “serious problems for…German companies”. Eastern Europeancountries were more interested in gettinginvestment from Chinese companies ratherthan waiting for guarantees of obtainingreciprocal concessions by China, becausethey have few expectations for their owncompanies there. At the same time, thereis a discussion on who would maintainthe blocking power over incoming deals.France, otherwise a protagonist for theproposal, is also in the lead for demandingthat blocking capacity remain at nationallevel, which in the worst case could leadto a patchwork of 27 different practicesrivalling China’s opacity.CHINA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipProcurement is wherethe strategy of reciprocalengagement is put to thetest of practice, yet nothingconcrete has been decided in2012 and Europe continued tomove at snail’s pace.03 RECIPROCITY IN ACCESS TO PUBLICPROCUREMENT IN EUROPE AND CHINA 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 2/5 2/5Resources 2/5 2/5 2/5Outcome 3/10 4/10 4/10Total 9/20 8/20 8/20C2010 C+ 2011 C
  33. 33. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 31Europeanswanttheircompaniestobeableto compete fairly against Chinese rivals.In 2012, they initiated 11 anti-dumpingand anti-subsidy cases against China.The biggest and most significant was theanti-dumping case against Chinese solar-panel manufacturers which the EuropeanCommission launched in September(see component 12). However, althoughthe original complaint was brought byGerman companies such as Berlin-basedSolarWorld – a few years ago the globalmarket leader – Chancellor AngelaMerkel urged the European Commissionnot to pursue the case, which she fearedcould prompt Chinese retaliation againstother German companies and ultimatelya trade war with China. In January, theWTO ruled in the EU’s favour on Chineseexport restrictions on raw materials.However, after it became clear that Chinadid not intend to lift restrictions on theexport of rare earth minerals in responseto the ruling, the EU, Japan, and the USlaunched a second challenge in the WTO.EU Trade Commissioner Karel De Guchtsaid he was “left with no other choice”.Europeans also have concerns aboutthe export subsidies that bolster risingChinese telecoms giants Huawei and ZTE,which are now competing with Europeancompanies such as Ericsson and Nokia. In2012, the European Commission hintedat opening a case against Huawei andZTE based on “solid evidence”, whichprompted retaliatory warning shots fromChina. In the end, however, no Europeancompanies that do business in China werewillingtosupportthecase.Concernsaboutsecurity and in particular about Huawei’salleged links with the Chinese military ledUS authorities to block investments in2012. In Europe, where Huawei employsmore than 5,000 people, there are similarconcerns. For example, the Britishgovernment and Huawei staff collaborateto provide assurance that their productsmeet government security standards priorto being deployed on UK networks. YetPrime Minister David Cameron welcomedHuawei’s chief executive at 10 DowningStreet on the same day as the US Congressbrandished his company a security threat.CHINA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipThe EU won a WTO caseon rare earth minerals andlaunched the largest anti-subsidy case on solar panels.Europeans also had concernsabout telecoms giants Huaweiand ZTE.04 TRADE DISPUTES WITH CHINA 2010 2011 2012Unity 3/5 3/5 4/5Resources 3/5 3/5 3/5Outcome 6/10 5/10 6/10Total 12/20 11/20 13/20B2010 B- 2011 B-
  34. 34. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201332In 2012, China did not become Europe’s“red knight” by massively purchasingsovereign debt, but it did continue toexpress confidence in the single currency.The governor of China’s central bank,Zhou Xiaochuan, said that China wouldnot reduce “the proportion of euroexposure in its reserves”. Though it doesnot publish the breakdown of its foreign-exchange reserves, it is estimated to holdaround 25 percent of currency reservesin euro-denominated assets. At the G20summit in June, China also announcedthat it would contribute $43 millionthrough the IMF, which could be triggeredfor European debt needs. Some Europeanofficials say in private that China hasbought significant amounts of sovereignbonds issued by southern eurozonecountries, but, like other private investors,it also experienced the enforced “haircut”on Greek debt, which may have made iteven more cautious in its European debtpurchases and thus increased rather thanreduced spreads in European bond yields.In 2012, German Chancellor AngelaMerkel, who visited China twice duringthe year, tended to speak to the Chineseon behalf of the eurozone as a whole.(China shares Germany’s view that the keyto solving the euro crisis – which Chineseofficials call a “sovereign debt problem” –is debt reduction.) Although Europeanswere less frantic than in 2011, possiblebond purchases remained the mostimportant topic in discussions with Chinafor deficit countries such as Spain. Thusthe euro crisis continued to undermineEuropean coherence in relation to Chinain 2012. In fact, even the meeting betweenHigh Representative Catherine Ashtonand State Councillor Dai Bingguo focusedon the euro crisis rather than foreignpolicy (Dai expressed “confidence in thefuture of Europe”). But there are signs thatEurope could become more coherent in2013. As the EU’s current-account balancegrows, some member states enjoy ultra-low interest rates, and as the EuropeanStability Mechanism (ESM) becomesoperational, China may have less leverageover Europe than it did during the acutephase of the crisis.CHINA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipEuropeans were less franticthan in 2011, but the eurocrisis continued to undermineEuropean coherence towardsChina. Chinese bondpurchases remain opaque.05 COOPERATION WITHCHINA ON THE EURO CRISIS 2010 2011 2012Unity – 2/5 2/5Resources – 2/5 2/5Outcome – 3/10 4/10Total – 7/20 8/20C2010 – 2011 C-
  35. 35. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 33Human-rights violations continued inChina in 2012 against the backgroundof the leadership transition. In June, theEU adopted a new human-rights strategy,which seeks to streamline the EU’sapproachtohumanrightsacrosscountriesand regions. High RepresentativeCatherine Ashton’s spokesperson said itwas “very clear” that the strategy appliedto China. The EU was also more vocal onhuman rights in 2012 than it was in 2011.For example, it included human-rightsdefenders, including Ai Weiwei, at theEU Nobel Prize event in Beijing, wherethe Chinese foreign ministry respondedby throwing an early New Year’s banquetthe same evening to reduce the numberof attendees to the EU event. The EUhuman-rights dialogue was also held inBrussels, although it stayed within itssymbolic confines and China refused fora third year to host a second round ofthe dialogue in China. Finally, the EUinstitutions didn’t manage to counterChina’s critical “press gag” at the EU–China summit in September and the endresult was that no press conference washeld at all.The slightly stronger push at EU levelhasn’t reduced completely memberstates’ desire to follow up on the bilaterallevel, but either outsourcing to the EUor outright bilateral denial of interestremained a strategy for countries suchas Italy, Malta, Portugal, and Romania.Others such as the Czech Republic,Germany, Sweden, and the UK reinforcedthe EU’s stance by taking the initiative onhuman rights in their bilateral dialogueswith China. Meanwhile, human-rightsviolations continued in China in 2012,particularly as the regime sought stabilityduring the political transition. Ai Weiweiwent on trial and, although the authoritieslet blind lawyer Chen Guangcheng go tothe US, they subsequently persecutedhis nephew. In fairness, the new long-awaited criminal procedure law didprovide certain improvements such asoutlawing evidence through torture,but also guaranteed the legality of theinfamous “black jails” in which detaineescan be held without scrutiny for prolongedperiods by the police.CHINA / Human rights and governanceAs human-rights violationscontinued against thebackground of the transition,Europeans were more vocal onhuman rights than they werein 2011.06 RULE OF LAW ANDHUMAN RIGHTS IN CHINAC2010 D+ 2011 D+ 2010 2011 2012Unity 2/5 2/5 3/5Resources 2/5 1/5 3/5Outcome 1/10 2/10 2/10Total 5/20 5/20 8/20
  36. 36. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201334In 2012, tensions continued between theEU and China over visits to Europe by theDalai Lama and the human-rights situationin Tibet, including cultural and religiousrights.TheEuropeanParliamentcontinuedits active stance through a resolutionrequesting the creation of a special envoyfor Tibet. High Representative CatherineAshton didn’t act on the suggestion butspoke clearly about the “deterioratingsituation in Tibet”. The Dalai Lama metwith the British prime minister, theAustrian chancellor and foreign minister,and the president of the Belgian Senate.However, in Italy there were no politicalmeetings and political pressure evenprevented the city of Milan from awardingthe Dalai Lama honorary citizenship. Asexpected, China retaliated against thosecountries that held political meetings withthe Dalai Lama. In particular, it cancelleda visit to the UK by a top Chinese officialand high-level political relations betweenthe two countries remain frozen. However,the UK does not seem to be consideringapologising or issuing a statement draftedby the Chinese, as other countries suchas France and Denmark have done. ButEuropeans have still not found a way toprotect individual member states fromChinese bullying.Several EU member states also raisedconcerns about the state of human rightsin Tibet at the UNHRC in June. Themost vocal were Denmark in its role asrotating president, Belgium, the CzechRepublic, France, Germany, Sweden, andthe UK. Latvia took issue with China onTibet when the Chinese defence ministervisited. Comments by Prime MinisterPetr Nečas also prompted a debate in theCzech Republic about human-rights policy.During former leader Vaclav Havel’slifetime, Czech politicians had always madea point of meeting with the Dalai Lama.But at a trade fair in Brno in September,Nečas criticised the Dalai Lama and saidthat publicly supporting such “fashionable”causes could have “consequences forour exports”. Foreign Minister KarelSchwarzenberg said it was a “horrifying”mistake.CHINA / Human rights and governanceEuropeans expressedconcerns about human rightsin Tibet but have not founda way to protect individualmember states from Chinesebullying when politicians meetwith the Dalai Lama.07 RELATIONS WITH CHINA ONTHE DALAI LAMA AND TIBET 2010 2011 2012Unity 2/5 2/5 2/5Resources 1/5 1/5 3/5Outcome 2/10 2/10 2/10Total 5/20 5/20 7/20C-2010 D+ 2011 D+
  37. 37. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 35Europeans seek to cooperate with Chinain stopping nuclear proliferation, inparticular in Iran and North Korea. Theyare directly involved in negotiations onIran through the E3 (France, the UK, andGermany). In 2012, the EU wanted Chinato support an international consensus ondealing with Iran or at least to agree tonot undermine or dilute such initiativesthroughitsbilateralengagementwithIran.The EU kept open lines of communicationwith China, both in official talks and inthe separate strategic dialogue, but Chinaremained non-committal. AlthoughBeijing has no desire to see a nuclear-armed Iran, it does not believe in cripplingsanctions or a military strike to preventIran developing nuclear weapons.China did not support the sanctions thatthe EU unilaterally imposed on Iran in2012 and even criticised the EU publiclyby calling sanctions a tool to intensify“confrontation”. Instead, a foreignministry spokesperson said China wantedto continue “normal and transparenttrade and energy exchanges” with Iran.European pressure, both in the E3+3meetings and through bilateral channels,did not produce any more commonground on how to proceed. However,China’s Arab partners had more successthan the Europeans. China’s increasingdependence on the Gulf for oil meant thatWen Jiabao had to criticise Iran moresharply than usual during a visit to SaudiArabia and other Gulf states.Europeans are not directly involved inthe stalled Six-Party talks on the NorthKorean nuclear programme. After KimJong-un took over from his father at theend of 2011, North Korea successfullylaunched a long-range rocket in Decemberafter a first launch in March spectacularlyfailed. The EU responded with statementsof protest. But although China said it alsoregretted the rocket launch, Europeansand other international partners wereunable to persuade it to take immediateaction against North Korea in the UNSC(though it agreed in early 2013 to tightensanctions).CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issuesTalks with China continued,but China publicly criticisedEU sanctions against Iran.Chinese reluctance alsodelayed action against NorthKorea.08 RELATIONS WITH CHINAON IRAN AND PROLIFERATIONB-2010 B+ 2011 B- 2010 2011 2012Unity 5/5 5/5 5/5Resources 4/5 3/5 4/5Outcome 6/10 4/10 3/10Total 15/20 12/20 12/20
  38. 38. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201336The EU has wide-ranging interests in Asiathat go beyond trade. In particular, it seeksregional security. However, Europeanshave not yet decided how to respond tothe US “pivot” to Asia or figured out whattheir role might be in the region. On paper,however, the EEAS did everything rightin 2012. High Representative CatherineAshton visited the region in what shecalled an “Asian Semester”, participated inthe ASEAN Regional Forum, and made ajoint statement with her US counterpart,Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, oncooperation in Asia. But although somesaw in this focus on Asia a European “mini-pivot”, it was mostly ignored in Beijing andeven in EU member state capitals.In June, the EU published new foreign-policy guidelines on Asia, which includedspeaking out on the conflicts in the SouthChina Sea. But during ASEM, the EU–Asiasummit, which was held in Laos, mostEU member states seemed as malleableas ASEAN member states on addressingmaritime disputes in the region afterpressure from China to keep silent. Still, onother occasions in 2012, the EEAS did startto speak up on the maritime conflicts inEast Asia and Ashton’s spokesperson calledfor “peaceful and cooperative solutions inaccordance with international law”. TheEast Asia Summit in November, convenedby ASEAN, passed without Europeanparticipation, but in July Ashton signedthe Treaty of Amity and Cooperation inSoutheast Asia (a non-aggression pactbetween ASEAN members and theirpartners), which is expected to allow theEU to participate in the future.As Burma moved towards democracy –and also to some extent away from Chineseinfluence – the EU was quick to respond.British Prime Minister David Cameron wasthe first Western leader to visit the countryandmetwithAungSanSuuKyiinRangoonin April. Shortly afterwards, the EU agreedto suspend for a year most sanctions inrecognition of the “historic changes” in thecountry.CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issuesEuropeans have not yetdecided how to respond to theUS “pivot” to Asia but becamemore vocal about maritimedisputes in East Asia in 2012.Sanctions on Burma weresuspended.09 RELATIONS WITH CHINA IN ASIA 2010 2011 2012Unity – – 4/5Resources – – 3/5Outcome – – 6/10Total – – 13/20B2010 – 2011 –
  39. 39. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 37Europeans aim to cooperate with Chinato limit the arms trade, support goodgovernance, and apply criteria such as theUN Millennium Development Goals toaid in Africa. The EEAS holds an annualdialogue on Africa and several memberstates such as France and the UK also holdbilateral dialogues. Some member statessuch as the UK also seek to engage Chinain trilateral cooperation on developmentaid and others such as Belgium and Franceseek to cooperate with Chinese companiesin Africa. Denmark has partnered withUN agencies to promote cooperation withChina on Africa.Europeans attended the opening ceremonyof China’s triennial Forum on China–Africa Cooperation (FOCAC) in July, butweren’t given the observer status they hadwanted. At FOCAC, China announced arenewed surge of cheap loans and a newfocus on regional governance and capacitybuilding to Africans to complementinfrastructure deals and cheap Chineselabour. This policy change seems to havebeen the result of criticism from Africansrather than European engagement withChina. It remains to be seen whether it isimplemented, but it already means thatAfricans pay more attention to action plansfrom Beijing than policy documents fromBrussels.In 2012, Europeans also sought Chinesecooperation in Mali, where the securitysituation deteriorated during the year asIslamists took over the northern part ofthe country. In October, China voted forUNSC Resolution 2007, which declaredthe situation a “threat to internationalpeace” and opened the way for militaryintervention and a military trainingmission led by the EU. In Sudan, Chinawas motivated by its commercial intereststo take a lead itself in managing the conflictbetween North and South Sudan during2012. China supported UNSC statementsin March and April and Resolution 2046in May, which demanded an end to thefighting between the two sides. The EU’sspecial envoy for Sudan and South Sudan,Rosalind Marsden, also went to China.CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issuesThe Chinese adopted a newapproach to engagementin Africa that copies theEU on governance. Led byFrance, Europeans reachedagreement with China onMali.10 RELATIONS WITH CHINA ON AFRICAB-2010 C+ 2011 B- 2010 2011 2012Unity 3/5 4/5 3/5Resources 3/5 3/5 3/5Outcome 4/10 5/10 5/10Total 10/20 12/20 11/20
  40. 40. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201338EuropeanswantChinatotakeresponsibilityfor global governance, especially at theUN and the IMF, commensurate with itsexpanding economic power. However,with the euro crisis still the main focus ofthe G20, the EU was not in a position tomake demands of China in 2012. Europeanefforts to agree a conventional arms treatywere thwarted by China, which insisted onlinking the issue to the EU’s arms embargo,as well as the US (see component 67).Europeans also failed to get Chinesesupport in the UNSC for an internationalresponse to the conflict in Syria: togetherwith Russia, China opposed any UNSCmandate for action against the AssadregimeonthebasisofwhatStateCouncillorDai Bingguo called the “ironclad principleof non-interference in others’ internalaffairs”. Yet China did twice take initiativeon Syria: first with a six-point proposalsimilar to what became the Annan Plan;and then with a ceasefire suggestion inOctober. China took these steps – perhapssmall steps for any solution in Syria butgiant steps for China’s normally reactivediplomacy – in order to demonstrate toits Arab League partners that it was beingconstructive. The Chinese also madecontacts with, but did not recognise, theSyrian opposition. If President Bashar al-Assad falls and a transition ensues, theseChinese steps open space for collaborationwith the EU and other powers since Chinawants to make friends with a new regimequickly and is likely to be a more willingpartner in international efforts.China was also pragmatic on conflicts inAfrica. In getting South Sudan and Sudanback to talks, China led active shuttlediplomacy and also was behind a firminternational response from the UN onthe issue. China’s national interest was inmaking sure oil continued to flow betweenthe two countries. China also allowed theFrench-led EU initiative for intervention inMali to pass in the UN without invoking itsprinciple of non-interference.CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issuesEuropeans failed to getChinese support for aninternational response to theconflict on Syria. But Chinacooperated on Sudan andMali.11 RELATIONS WITH CHINA ONREFORMING GLOBAL GOVERNANCE 2010 2011 2012Unity 3/5 3/5 2/5Resources 2/5 2/5 2/5Outcome 2/10 2/10 2/10Total 7/20 7/20 6/20C-2010 C- 2011 C-
  41. 41. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 39The EU aims to secure China’s cooperationon climate change, including on associatedgreen technologies and energy efficiency.In 2012, the EU took initiative with a largeenergy forum in May that was attendedby Li Keqiang, China’s new number two.This fits with China’s ambition to curbenergy intensity in its economy and withthe EU’s ambition to get China to reduceits carbon footprint. However, in theinternational negotiations at the summitin Doha, progress was back to snail’s paceafter last year’s breakthrough. “Frustrationis a renewable source”, said EU ClimateAction Commissioner Connie Hedegaard.Still, the EU managed to further chip awayat the distinction between developed anddeveloping economies and managed to getChina to stick to its previous commitments,including to a global deal by 2015.On other areas, there was more friction.Following external pressure from China,Russia, and the US, and internal pressurefrom Airbus and France, the EU postponedthe application of the carbon airfare taxin 2013. China remains strongly opposedto the tax and ordered its airlines notto comply with the EU legislation andcontinued to cooperate with Russia andthe US. The issue is likely to create furthertension between the EU and China nextyear.Solar panels were also a hot issue after theEU decided in September to pursue ananti-dumping complaint against Chinesesolar-panel manufacturers. Although theoriginal complaint was brought by Germancompanies, Chancellor Angela Merkelurged the European Commission not topursue the case, which she feared couldprompt a trade war with China. The anti-subsidy case will affect more than $35.8billion in Chinese exports of solar products.A Chinese business insider called it a“disaster for the Chinese solar industry”,although the industry is surviving on a dietof subsidies from state-owned banks. TheChinese state retaliated with a WTO caseagainst European polysilicon producersthat export to China.CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issuesThe EU managed to keepthe ball rolling at Doha andenhanced bilateral cooperationwith China on energy. But theEU and China clashed oversolar panels and carbon taxes.12 RELATIONS WITH CHINAON CLIMATE CHANGEB+2010 B 2011 B+ 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 4/5 4/5Resources 4/5 4/5 5/5Outcome 5/10 7/10 6/10Total 13/20 15/20 15/20
  42. 42. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201340RussiaB-Overall gradeOverall grade 2011 C+Overall grade 2010 C+
  43. 43. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 41CHINA / Cooperation on regional and global issues 2012 2011 2010TRADE LIBERALISATION AND OVERALL RELATIONSHIP B B B-13 Trade liberalisation with Russia B+ A- B- 14 Visa liberalisation with Russia B- B- C+ HUMAN RIGHTS AND GOVERNANCE C C- C-15 Rule of law and human rights in Russia C+ C- C16 Media freedom in Russia C C- C-17 Stability and human rights in the North Caucasus C C- C-EUROPEAN SECURITY ISSUES B- B- C+18 Relations with Russia on the Eastern Partnership B- C+ C19 Relations with Russia on protracted conflicts C+ C+ C+20 Relations with Russia on energy issues B B- C+21 Diversification of gas-supply routes to Europe C+ B- B-COOPERATION ON REGIONAL AND GLOBAL ISSUES B- C+ B-22 Relations with Russia on Iran and proliferation B B- A-23 Relations with Russia on the Greater Middle East B B- n/a24 Relations with Russia on climate change C C+ C+25 Relations with Russia on the Arctic B n/a n/a2012 was a good year for European unity and resolve in relation to Russia –for a long time one of the most divisive issues in European foreign policy. Butalthough the year started with excitement and expectations of possible changesinside Russia, it ended in disappointment after Vladimir Putin was re-electedas president in March. Putin’s new regime is weaker than it previously was,but therefore resorts to coarser measures to deal with dissent. Although thepro-Putin consensus of the first decade of the century has collapsed, there areno credible challengers, and neither the regime nor the opposition has a viablestrategy for the future. European disappointment and Moscow’s unwillingnessto cooperate with the EU on almost any issue made real dialogue almostimpossible in 2012.After meeting with force the first anti-Putin demonstrations that broke outafter the December 2011 parliamentary elections, the regime changed tacticsand, up until the presidential elections in March, allowed rallies to proceed
  44. 44. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201342peacefully. It also relaxed controls on the media: between January and March,many opposition figures who had been banned from the state-controlledtelevision channels for years were invited to participate in talk shows andthe state-controlled media also started to cover the demonstrations and didnot hesitate to ask Putin inconvenient questions. Even though this new, openapproach was clearly dictated by election-campaign logic rather than respecttowards rights and freedoms, the EU still welcomed it. It also gave a moderatelypositive assessment of the presidential elections: it asked Russia to address theshortcomings in the conduct of elections but did not question Putin’s victory.However,immediatelyafterPutin’sinaugurationinMay,therewasacrackdown.Demonstrations were once again dissolved by force and many activists weredetained (quite a few still remain behind bars). New laws were adopted thatre-criminalised slander and severely restricted freedom of assembly as well asworking conditions for NGOs. The vague way in which these laws are formulatedmeans that they can be arbitrarily applied to punish almost any civic activism.European leaders criticised these developments with unanimity and clarity.Most significant was the change of mood in Germany – in the past, Russia’s bestfriend in the EU. Chancellor Angela Merkel’s envoy for relations with Russiancivil society, Andreas Schockenhoff, was publicly critical of Putin’s handlingof the trial of members of the punk band Pussy Riot and of Russia’s responseto the Syria crisis. In November, ahead of a visit by Merkel to Moscow, theBundestag adopted a resolution (drafted by Schockenhoff) that was unusuallycritical of developments in Russia, which was followed by a sharp exchangebetween Merkel and Putin about Russia’s human-rights record just a few dayslater during their meeting. Thus Germany, which was once a problem for acoherent and effective European policy towards Russia, might slowly but surelybe becoming one of Europe’s leaders on this issue.Despite this new resolve, however, the EU’s actual influence on conditionson the ground in Russia remains very limited. Still, the EU did not hesitateto demonstrate its muscle on energy relations with Russia and, in September,the European Commission took an unprecedented step by launching an anti-competition probe against Russian state energy giant Gazprom for possibleabuse of its dominant market position in Central and Eastern Europe. Inresponse, Putin issued a decree forbidding Gazprom and other “strategicallyimportant companies that do business overseas” from providing information toforeign regulators unless they obtain approval from the Kremlin.
  45. 45. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 43EU–Russia trade relations could have been the success story of the year. InAugust, Russia finally became a formal member of the WTO – the step that hadbeen strongly supported by the EU during the 18-year-long negotiations. ButRussia’s application of new protectionist measures even after officially joiningthe WTO has made the EU visibly frustrated, prompting Trade CommissionerKarel De Gucht to complain in December that “Russia is doing exactly theopposite to what it is supposed to do” and to hint that EU retaliation – forwhich the WTO framework provides legal options – may be on the cards sometime soon.In recent years the EU has made progress in diversifying its energy imports,especially gas-supply sources, by building interconnectors between memberstates. However, the Nabucco project, one of the EU’s main projects to ensuregas supply from sources other than Russia, now seems to be viable – if at all –only in its “lighter” version as “Nabucco West” after Turkey’s and Azerbaijan’sannouncement in 2012 that they would build their own pipeline. In December,Russia raised the stakes by announcing construction of the South Streampipeline, a direct competitor to Nabucco – but so far it is unclear to what extentthis will actually influence the EU’s energy policies.There was also little substantial cooperation between the Europeans andRussia on resolution of the protracted conflicts in the neighbourhood.Germany remains heavily involved in the Transnistria dispute, but apart fromre-launching the formal talks in the 5+2 format (including Moscow), therewas little progress. However, the EU did occasionally stand up to defend itsneighbours against Russian pressure and did so more vocally than in the past:Energy Commissioner Günther Oettinger called on EU member states to standby Moldova and called a possible gas-price hike from Russia “pure blackmail”and Moscow’s behaviour “unacceptable”.The EU and a number of individual member states also worked hard to persuadeRussia to drop its opposition to more determined international action on Syria.But although the question was on the agenda of most bilateral exchanges withRussia, it had little success: Russia, together with China, vetoed resolutionspushed by the EU and the US to impose UN sanctions on the Assad regime.Thus, although Europe has demonstrated laudable unity in its reactions tothe events and flexed its muscles on several important dossiers – namely, inenergy and trade relations – it clearly lacks power to influence developmentsinside Russia. In handling relations with Russia, the EEAS was not in a lead
  46. 46. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201344role – the most important issues were handled either by the member statesor by the European Commission – but it has been instrumental in exchanginginformation and contributed more substantially to certain policies, such as theEU’s stance on human rights in Russia. The challenge for Europe is now tocapitalise on its new unity and resolve and devise smart ways to contribute todemocratic change in Russia, while also engaging in diplomatic “contingencyplanning” in case things get worse before they get better.
  47. 47. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 45The EU wants to see further tradeliberalisation with Russia. There was animportant step forward in August when,after lengthy negotiations, Russia finallyformally joined the WTO. The EU’s mostimportant objective now in this respect is tomakesurethatRussiaactuallyfollowsWTOrules. Currently, there are around dozenissues on which it is in breach of the rules:it has an import ban on livestock; it chargesso-called scrapping or recycling fees forimported cars; and there are ongoing anti-dumping cases. Russia also applies tariffshigher than those allowed by WTO rules.The WTO dispute-settlement mechanismhas equipped the EU with a good arsenalof legitimate ways for retaliation. Butalthough the EU would prefer to solve thedifferences without resorting to these, itspatience is close to being exhausted – asTrade Commissioner Karel De Gucht madeclear in December.The main reason for the lack of progress in2012 was that Russia did not reciprocate.A mutual free-trade agreement betweenRussia and the EU has effectively beenshelved, because Russia’s CommonEconomic Space with non-WTOmembers Belarus and Kazakhstan makesany progress on this front practicallyimpossible. The EU has also been hoping tonegotiate a new wide-ranging partnershipagreement with Russia, to replace the oldPartnership and Cooperation Agreement(PCA), but negotiations are stuck. TheEU wants the trade-related clauses of thisagreement to go further than what hasbeen agreed in the WTO framework; it alsowants to prevent the agreement being tiltedin Russia’s favour like the former PCA,which gave Russia “most favoured nation”status without getting much in return. Sofar, there is no evidence of enthusiasticreciprocation from the Russian side.EU member states were unanimous instressing that Russia needs to complywith the rules, with those most affectedby non-compliance (such as automobilemanufacturers and livestock exporters) inthe lead.RUSSIA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipRussia’s accession to the WTOwas an important step forwardbut it was unwilling to obey theWTO rules and to engage infurther liberalisation.13 TRADE LIBERALISATION WITH RUSSIA 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 5/5 5/5Resources 3/5 3/5 4/5Outcome 5/10 8/10 5/10Total 12/20 16/20 14/20B+2010 B- 2011 A-
  48. 48. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 201346RUSSIA / Trade liberalisation and overall relationshipMoscow wants visa-free travel with the EUby the time of the 2014 Winter Olympics,which will be held at Sochi, on the BlackSea. But despite Russian pressure in 2012,Europeans remained impressively unitedin asking Russia to first fulfil a number ofpreviously agreed conditions (specifiedin the “common steps” towards visaliberalisation between the EU and Russiawhich were agreed in 2011) that they see asa pre-condition for lifting the visa regimewith Russia.In 2012, several mutual expert missionstook place. But Russia was slow toimplementanumberofconditionsitagreedto in the “common steps” package and theEU could have done more to explain to theRussianpublicwhatthecountryhastodotoget visa freedom – for example, by makingthe “common steps” document public.A visa-facilitation agreement that wouldallow more groups (including students andbusinesses) to travel from Russia to the EUand vice versa with fewer documents and asmaller fee is close to completion, but kepthostage by Russia’s demand that the so-called service passport holders be grantedvisa-free travel under the deal – a conditionthat the EU refuses to accept.Even though member states now agreethat Russia should have a perspective of avisa-free regime with the EU, a debate onits conditions effectively still lies ahead.Finding unanimity within Europe could bea challenge because some member statesmay tie technical requirements outlinedin the “common steps” to demands onthe human-rights situation and the ruleof law in Russia or to other issues. Somemember states such as Italy and Spain areopen to a shorter timeframe for abolishingthe regime; others such as Lithuania,Latvia, and the four Visegrad countriespoint out that all technical requirementsmust be met and Moscow should not geta “geopolitical discount” compared toUkraine or Moldova. However, neither ofthese potential debates undermined theEU’s dialogue with Russia in 2012.Europeans stood firm asRussia pushed for visafreedom without fulfillingthe agreed technicalpreconditions. But findingunanimity on politicalconditions will be a challenge.14 VISA LIBERALISATION WITH RUSSIAB-2010 C+ 2011 B- 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 4/5 5/5Resources 3/5 3/5 3/5Outcome 3/10 4/10 4/10Total 10/20 11/20 12/20
  49. 49. EUROPEAN FOREIGN POLICY SCORECARD 2013 47RUSSIA / Human rights and governanceIn 2012, the EU sharpened its focus onhuman rights and the rule of law, but itdid not manage to arrest or even slow thedeterioration of political freedom in Russia.After demonstrations were allowed toproceed during the first few months of theyear,acrackdownstartedaftertheelections.In early May, demonstrations were againbroken up by force and many activistswere detained and charged for economiccrimes or for plotting to organise riots.In August, a Moscow court passed a two-year-long jail sentence for three membersof the punk group Pussy Riot (one of themwas conditionally freed in October), whowere arrested in February after performinga song criticising the closeness betweenPresident Vladimir Putin and the RussianOrthodox Church in a prominent Moscowcathedral. Most importantly, Russia passedseveral notorious laws that restrict freedomof assembly, re-criminalise slander, andhamper work conditions for NGOs.Europeans were vocal in criticising thesedevelopments in Russia. The EEASplayed a significant role by coordinatingthe writing of a human-rights report onRussia. It also convened two rounds ofthe human-rights consultations – both inBrussels in 2012 because Russia refusedto hold it in Moscow. Member statesalso demonstrated greater unanimitythan in the past. Potentially significantis Germany’s criticism of developmentsinside Russia, which became more vocal in2012.InNovember,theBundestagadopteda critical resolution and there was a sharpexchange between Chancellor AngelaMerkel and Putin a few days later. Manysmaller member states such as Sweden alsoadopted a noticeably principled stand.However, Europeans did not take anyfurther action such as the adoption of the“Magnitsky law” to discourage perpetratorsof human-rights violations inside Russia.Although the Dutch parliament and theEuropean Parliament pushed the issue,Europeans did not move forward with suchlegislation, unlike the United States, whichin December legalised visa and asset banson Russian state officials involved in themurder of the lawyer Sergei Magnitsky.Europeans criticised thedeterioration in politicalfreedoms in Russia in 2012,with Germany becoming oneof the more critical memberstates, but did not takefurther action.15 RULE OF LAW ANDHUMAN RIGHTS IN RUSSIA 2010 2011 2012Unity 4/5 3/5 4/5Resources 2/5 2/5 3/5Outcome 2/10 2/10 2/10Total 8/20 7/20 9/20C+2010 C 2011 C-

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