STIGMA: Sex, Drugs, and Everything Else

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This presentation was delivered at the Richmond MHC Stigma conference and was used to demonstrate how images and cultural attitudes create stigma in our community related to sex and drugs.

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STIGMA: Sex, Drugs, and Everything Else

  1. 1. STIGMASex, Drugs, and Everything Else Adam Thompson, B.A. October 6, 2012
  2. 2. What is stigma?• Stigma (noun) 1. a mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality, or personFrom: http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/stigma Accessed on: 09/18/12
  3. 3. STIGMA:Notes on the Management of a Spoiled Identity• Erving Goffman – Sociologist who wrote about • Types of stigma • How individuals deal with stigma • How persons with stigma relate to others
  4. 4. Types of Stigma• Discredited Stigma – This individual assumes “his differentness is already known about or is evident on the spot”• Discreditable Stigma – This individual assumes that his stigma “is neither known about by those present nor immediately perceivable by them.”From: http://www.sinclair.edu/academics/lcs/departments/soc/pub/casilab/coping_deviance/coping_with_deviance_act.pdfAccessed on: 09/18/12
  5. 5. Stigma Management1. Some stigmatized people can physically remove their stigma2. People can master those areas that stigmatize them3. Stigmatized people can use their stigma for secondary gain4. Stigmatized persons can come to view their stigma as a blessing that has taught them a great deal about many other thingsFrom: http://www.sinclair.edu/academics/lcs/departments/soc/pub/casilab/coping_deviance/coping_with_deviance_act.pdfAccessed on: 09/18/12
  6. 6. Stigma Management5. A stigma can cause people to reassess the limits of normals rather than focus only on their own limitations. They can come to believe that normals have their limitations too6. Stigmatized persons can avoid contact with normals7. Stigmatized people often seek out sympathetic others who, while they do not have a stigma, are sympathetic to itFrom: http://www.sinclair.edu/academics/lcs/departments/soc/pub/casilab/coping_deviance/coping_with_deviance_act.pdfAccessed on: 09/18/12
  7. 7. The Stage TheoryErving Goffman, STIMA: Notes on the Management of a Spoiled Identity, 1963
  8. 8. The Players of Goffman’s Theatre• Backstage – The “Own” – The “Wise”• Audience – The “Normals”
  9. 9. What you don’t learn in school …STIGMA AND SEXUALITY
  10. 10. Where did this come from?
  11. 11. Which is appropriate? What you CAN get in your mail What you CAN’T get in some schoolsPolitical Ad: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/12/mark-grisanti-buffalo-matt-ricchiazzi_n_1877868.html
  12. 12. GAY MAN What my friends think I do What my parents think I do What my society thinks I doWhat Rick Santorum thinks I do What I think I do What I actually do
  13. 13. LESBIAN WOMEN What society thinks we do What social conservatives think What men think we do we doWhat my Mom thinks we do What I think we do What we actually do
  14. 14. What you don’t learn in school
  15. 15. What you don’t learn in schoolVagina Model Penis Model Anus Model
  16. 16. What you don’t learn in school
  17. 17. Anti-Stigma Campaigns
  18. 18. Small Group Discussion• What other forms of stigma have you seen in your communities?• What important messages and/or information are not getting out there because of stigma?• How do we combat stigma related to sexuality and sexual topics?
  19. 19. What you don’t learn in school …STIGMA AND SUBSTANCE USE
  20. 20. Anti-Drug Ads
  21. 21. Television Series
  22. 22. Television Representations
  23. 23. What you didn’t learn in schoolCocaine and Alcohol Amphetamines and LSD Marijuana
  24. 24. Justice is Blind? BLACK POOR Crack WHITE RICHCocaine
  25. 25. Stoner?
  26. 26. Junkie?
  27. 27. What’s the difference?UseMisuseAbuseAddiction
  28. 28. Is it this predictable?
  29. 29. Small Group Discussion• What other forms of stigma have you seen in your communities?• What important messages and/or information are not getting out there because of stigma?• How do we combat stigma related to substance use and substance users?
  30. 30. Conclusion• Stigma is pervasive through our culture from history, media, personal perceptions, and fears• Stigma is a way we disgrace others because of their behavior or characteristics• Stigma manifests because of misconceptions and stereotypes due to a lack of information• Stigma can prevent important and sometimes life- saving information from reaching target audiences
  31. 31. Contact Information Adam ThompsonAdamTThompson@gmail.com 864.354.8468
  32. 32. Resources• Goffman, Erving. STIGMA: Notes on the Management of a Spoiled Identity. New York: Simon and Schuster Inc. 1963.• Rosengarten, E. Coping with Deviance: Erving Goffman STIGMA – http://www.sinclair.edu/academics/lcs/departments/soc/pub/casilab/coping_dev iance/coping_with_deviance_act.pdf• Political Ad: The Committee to Save the Erie County Republican Party – http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/09/12/mark-grisanti-buffalo-matt- ricchiazzi_n_1877868.html• Anti-Stigma Ads – CAMBA http://www.pitchengine.com/camba.org/camba-launches-2012- antistigma-campaign-urging-compassion-for--27000-brooklynites-living-with- hivaids – DC Office of Human Rights https://www.facebook.com/DCOHR – POZ and PROUD http://www.mobypicture.com/user/Pozandproud• Drug Sentencing Inequity – http://www.nytimes.com/2008/05/10/opinion/10sat1.html

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