Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Plagiarism referencing for p hds 2017 webinar for websites

159 views

Published on

Updated slides used in webinar for phds

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Plagiarism referencing for p hds 2017 webinar for websites

  1. 1. © Middlesex University Understanding plagiarism and referencing http://unihub.mdx.ac.uk/your-study/library-and-it-support LET and Library 2017-18
  2. 2. © Middlesex University Prerequisites • This session assumes you have: • Completed our induction worksheet inc basics of: – Summon and – RefWorks http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/ld.php?content_id=31163965 • Had a 121 with your Subject Liaison Librarian http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/liaisonlibrarians
  3. 3. © Middlesex University Getting ready for the session • Use Firefox or Chrome, not Internet Explorer • Log in to myUniHub and go to My Study > My Library (no need for Athens via this route) • Slides and documents are available at: • http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/research/training or • Researcher Development section of My Learning • Get the Middlesex University app – Free!
  4. 4. © Middlesex University myUniHub > MyStudy > MyLibrary > MySubject – Library Guides > Research > Training
  5. 5. © Middlesex University Other useful Library Guides • Your librarians http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/liaisonlibrarians • Distance learners http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/distancelearners • Inter library loans (Free for researchers) http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/interlibraryloan/interlibraryloans • Lynda.com (self teaching online resources collection) http://libguides.mdx.ac.uk/lynda_com
  6. 6. © Middlesex University Welcome • Plagiarism • How does it feel? • What is it? • How might it effect my future? • Referencing • Cite them Right Online • RefWorks and Write N Cite • Linking Summon to RefWorks • Saving and sharing files. • Write and cite as you go http://www.ee.iitb.ac.in/~stallur/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/reference.gif
  7. 7. © Middlesex University How does it feel? • Think of something you are proud to have created • How did it make you feel when you created it? • What response did you get from friends, family, others? https://smpsboston.org/wp-content/uploads/Feelings-march.jpg
  8. 8. © Middlesex University How does it feel now? • Imagine an extreme racist party had copied your work • They are using it to raise funds for their party. • How do you feel now? https://smpsboston.org/wp-content/uploads/Feelings-march.jpg
  9. 9. © Middlesex University What is plagiarism? One famous incident of undeclared influence is that of Beyonce’s Single Ladie’s choreography which was influenced by a Bob Fosse number from the 70s. Plagiarism is not just about words and text. Mexican Breakfast vs Single Ladies (2017) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOAwBUfy fDg
  10. 10. © Middlesex University What is plagiarism?
  11. 11. © Middlesex University What is plagiarism? “the practice of taking someone else's work or ideas and passing them off as one's own”. synonyms:copying, infringement of copyright, piracy, theft, stealing, cribbing Oxford Dictionaries (2017) What are the complexities of avoiding this in Academia, particularly at research level?
  12. 12. © Middlesex University What are the challenges? BoredPanda 2015 • How do we technically acknowledging the original influence • How do we respect the integrity of the original influence and recognise how ideas have shaped our thinking. • How do we create something entirely new from synthesising multiple influences and go beyond making just slight changes.
  13. 13. © Middlesex University What challenges and impact might these activities have at research level? • Keeping track of which data comes from which source. • Becoming an expert. • Distinguishing originality and legacy. • Honestly reflecting on our influences. • Taking or conferring ownership of ideas. • Respecting the integrity of ideas. • Persevering.
  14. 14. © Middlesex University How might it effect my career? • Marcu, Danut (2006) ̧ ‘A note on the rooted loopless planar maps.’ Geombinatorics 16 (2), pp266–269. • As the editor of this journal announced subsequently in a paper entitled “The case of Dr.Danut ̧ Marcu: Serial plagiarism and signing false statements” [A. Soifer, Geombinatorics 16 (2007), no. 3, 293– 296], this paper “nearly word-for-word repeats” [E. A. Bender and N. C. Wormald, Discrete Math. 54 (1985), no. 2, 235–237; MR0791664]. • That announcement also points out that three other papers by Marcu previously published in Geombinatorics [Geombinatorics 13 (2004), no. 3, 139–140; Geombinatorics 13 (2004), no. 4, 178–179; Geombinatorics 14 (2004), no. 1, 18–20], as well as a recent submission to that journal, were also plagiarised. • http://www.ams.org/mathscinet/pdf/2300813.pdf?agg_author_119670=119670&arg3=&batch_title=Selected%20Matches%20fo r%3A%20Anywhere%3D%28plagiarism%29&co4=AND&co5=AND&co6=AND&co7=AND&dr=all&fmt=doc&pg4=ALLF&pg5=TI &pg6=PC&pg7=ALLF&pg8=ET&review_format=html&s4=plagiarism&s5=&s6=&s7=&s8=All&searchin=&sort=newest&vfpref=ht ml&yearRangeFirst=&yearRangeSecond=&yrop=eq&r=1
  15. 15. © Middlesex University Banned • The case of Dr. Danut Marcu: Serial plagiarism and signing false statements by Alexander Soifer. Editor, Geombinatorics • On December 2, 2006 my attention has been brought to one of Geombinatorics‘ authors, who is described in Wikipedia as follows: • Danut Marcu … claims to have authored 378 scientific papers. Marcu is frequently accused of plagiarism. • The editors of Studia Universitatis Babes-Bolyai, Informatica decided to ban Marcu from their journal for this reason, as did the editors of4OR: A Quarterly Journal of Operations Research [Springer]. • The editors of Geometriae Dedicata state that they suspect Marcu of plagiarism, as he submitted a manuscript which is “more-or-less word for word the same” as a paper by Lindström. Grossman, Kageyama, Pettet, and anonymous reviewers have accused Marcu of plagiarism in MathSciNet reviews. • http://geombina.uccs.edu/?page_id=88
  16. 16. © Middlesex University Referencing made easy • Cite them Right Online • RefWorks • Write N Cite • Linking Summon to RefWorks https://i2.wp.com/highjinx.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/magic-wand.jpg?fit=3464%2C2309
  17. 17. © Middlesex University Cite them Right myUniHub > MyStudy > MyLibrary > Databases > C
  18. 18. © Middlesex University RefWorks – create account
  19. 19. © Middlesex University RefWorks – your resources
  20. 20. © Middlesex University Google Scholar – set RefWorks
  21. 21. © Middlesex University Google Scholar – save to RefWorks
  22. 22. © Middlesex University Summon to RefWorks
  23. 23. © Middlesex University Summon saves direct to RefWorks
  24. 24. © Middlesex University RefWorks: Tools Tools
  25. 25. © Middlesex University
  26. 26. © Middlesex University Sharing and organising
  27. 27. © Middlesex University Quick cite
  28. 28. © Middlesex University Write-n-Cite • https://youtu.be/fkC5uBt4tnI • If using Win 10 & Word 2016 (NOT 365) use RefWorks Citation Manager
  29. 29. © Middlesex University Citing as you write • For in-text citations we need referencing systems and reporting verbs to make it absolutely clear to our reader which parts of our text come from which author and which are our own original voice. • We need to respect the original message and avoid misquoting or misrepresenting others idea by taking things out of context or changing meaning when we paraphrase. • We need to synthesise information from different sources and recognise in what ways different ideas and theorists align or challenge each other. It could be that underlying philosophy is the same but the interpretation of how we act on that differs. We need to explicitly show those relationships. • If we understand clearly how different schools of thought and ideas fit together for our context, then we are able to declare our own position. So once we have cited material from literature, we need to position ourselves within it. • We then need to bring all of this together and present our own creation which is grounded in the work of those who have gone before us.
  30. 30. © Middlesex University Citing as you write • Reporting verbs • Compare and contrast • Debate • Defining language • New language • Referencing conventions • Positioning statements • Paraphrasing and redefining So what discourse features emerge?
  31. 31. © Middlesex University Any questions?
  32. 32. © Middlesex University Other sessions available • Library resources • Google Scholar • Citation Searching • Finding the best journals to publish in • Open Access • Repositories for your work and data
  33. 33. © Middlesex University Reference List • Blomqvist, M. (2013), Drawing and Shapes, accessed from http://drawingandshapes.blogspot.co.uk/ on 16.09.2017 • Bored Panda (2015), The Mona Lisa Reimagined by 300 of the Most Innovative Artists, accessed from https://www.boredpanda.com/mona-lisa-reimagined-by-nearly-300-of- the-worlds-most-innovative-artists/ on 16.09.2017 • Kscopemarketing (2013), Be Passionate and Know your Niche, accessed from http://marketingforprofessionals.co.nz/ on /, on 16.09.2017 • Mexican Breakfast vs Single Ladies (2017) accessed from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mOAwBUfyfDg on 16.09.217 • Oxford Dictionaries (2017), Plagiarism, accessed from https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/plagiarism on 16.09.217 • Private Writing (2017), Compare and Contrast Essay: Try These Simple Tips to Write Your Essay, accessed from https://www.privatewriting.com/compare-contrast-essay on 16.09.2017 • Ross, J. (2017), Elephant in the room, accessed from https://jeffrossblog.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/elephantintheroom-leo_cullum.png on 16.09.2017

×