Expanding orphans and vulnerable children    support in Haiti: Improving the definition    of ‘support’    Elaine Baruwa, P...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Expanding Orphans and Vulnerable Children Support in Haiti: Improving the Definition of 'Support'

266 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
266
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Expanding Orphans and Vulnerable Children Support in Haiti: Improving the Definition of 'Support'

  1. 1. Expanding orphans and vulnerable children support in Haiti: Improving the definition of ‘support’ Elaine Baruwa, PhD, Rachelle Castagnol, MD, Asha Sharma, MA, Natasha Hsi, MPH, Abt AssociatesBackground Educational Support Results Nutritional Support Results HIV can further debilitate Haitian children beyond $300 $500 their already challenged circumstances $450  2008 WHO estimates for Haiti: 50% primary $250 school enrollment, DTP3 immunization rate of $400 53%, 29% of children <5 years old are moderately $350 $200 to severely malnourished $300 PEPFAR and Global Fund have been funding OVC $250 $150 programs since 2003 $200 June 12th earthquake exacerbated an already harsh $100 $150 situation for children in and around Haiti’s densely populated capital, Port-au-Prince $100 EMMUS-IV* estimated 25% of children to be $50 $50 ‘vulnerable’ in 2006 – which equates to $0 Household Food Individual Food Package Ready-to-Use 3 Meals/Day/Child approximately 800,000 children in 2009 $0 Primary Education Secondary Uniforms School Bags Vocational Training Package Therapeutic Food Course/Child Education *http:/www.measuredhs.com/pub_details.cfm?ID=767 Partner 1 Partner 2 Partner 3 Partner 4 Partner 1 Partner 2 Partner 3 Partner 4 All partners report providing educational support to thousands All partners report providing educational support to thousandsObjectives and Methods of OVC but of OVC but  Type of support varies widely  Type and cost of support varies widely across partners (as Precisely define and cost the OVC services delivered  Cost per child varies widely low as $50 and as high as $450) in Haiti Recommendations include: Recommendations include:  To deepen understanding of OVC support provided  Partners should be required to report precise descriptions  Partners should be required to report precise descriptions beyond broad PEPFAR indicators reported of support and costs per child supported of support and costs per child supported  To support program funding decision-making  Impact evaluations are critical, funders fund children in  Impact evaluations are critical, funders want to school but school fees ≠ educated child increase/improve OVC nutrition, but no partner monitored  To support quality improvement activities child weight The four largest PEPFAR implementing partners were selected for:  Key informant interviews (program managers, Next Steps financial o cers)  Increasing the specificity of M&E and financial reporting  Financial report reviews  Health Systems20/20 is piloting output-based financial reporting of community-based care (including  Monitoring and evaluation data reviews OVC care) in Mozambique and Tanzania in 2011  Further work on understanding impact of services delivered is highly recommended  To di erentiate between process measures and actual impact/achievements and streamline care to high-impact interventions  To ensure appropriate use of costing information – the cheapest should not always be used and the most expensive should not always be dropped  To reduce barriers to partnering with other funders by ensuring that each funder can identify their contribution and impact  To increase our understanding of potential use of OVC support/partners in reaching OVCs with health June 2011 January 2010 interventions, referral systems and monitoring of impact www.abtassociates.com

×