Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Expanding orphans and vulnerable children    support in Haiti: Improving the definition    of ‘support’    Elaine Baruwa, P...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Expanding Orphans and Vulnerable Children Support in Haiti: Improving the Definition of 'Support'

269 views

Published on

Published in: News & Politics, Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Expanding Orphans and Vulnerable Children Support in Haiti: Improving the Definition of 'Support'

  1. 1. Expanding orphans and vulnerable children support in Haiti: Improving the definition of ‘support’ Elaine Baruwa, PhD, Rachelle Castagnol, MD, Asha Sharma, MA, Natasha Hsi, MPH, Abt AssociatesBackground Educational Support Results Nutritional Support Results HIV can further debilitate Haitian children beyond $300 $500 their already challenged circumstances $450  2008 WHO estimates for Haiti: 50% primary $250 school enrollment, DTP3 immunization rate of $400 53%, 29% of children <5 years old are moderately $350 $200 to severely malnourished $300 PEPFAR and Global Fund have been funding OVC $250 $150 programs since 2003 $200 June 12th earthquake exacerbated an already harsh $100 $150 situation for children in and around Haiti’s densely populated capital, Port-au-Prince $100 EMMUS-IV* estimated 25% of children to be $50 $50 ‘vulnerable’ in 2006 – which equates to $0 Household Food Individual Food Package Ready-to-Use 3 Meals/Day/Child approximately 800,000 children in 2009 $0 Primary Education Secondary Uniforms School Bags Vocational Training Package Therapeutic Food Course/Child Education *http:/www.measuredhs.com/pub_details.cfm?ID=767 Partner 1 Partner 2 Partner 3 Partner 4 Partner 1 Partner 2 Partner 3 Partner 4 All partners report providing educational support to thousands All partners report providing educational support to thousandsObjectives and Methods of OVC but of OVC but  Type of support varies widely  Type and cost of support varies widely across partners (as Precisely define and cost the OVC services delivered  Cost per child varies widely low as $50 and as high as $450) in Haiti Recommendations include: Recommendations include:  To deepen understanding of OVC support provided  Partners should be required to report precise descriptions  Partners should be required to report precise descriptions beyond broad PEPFAR indicators reported of support and costs per child supported of support and costs per child supported  To support program funding decision-making  Impact evaluations are critical, funders fund children in  Impact evaluations are critical, funders want to school but school fees ≠ educated child increase/improve OVC nutrition, but no partner monitored  To support quality improvement activities child weight The four largest PEPFAR implementing partners were selected for:  Key informant interviews (program managers, Next Steps financial o cers)  Increasing the specificity of M&E and financial reporting  Financial report reviews  Health Systems20/20 is piloting output-based financial reporting of community-based care (including  Monitoring and evaluation data reviews OVC care) in Mozambique and Tanzania in 2011  Further work on understanding impact of services delivered is highly recommended  To di erentiate between process measures and actual impact/achievements and streamline care to high-impact interventions  To ensure appropriate use of costing information – the cheapest should not always be used and the most expensive should not always be dropped  To reduce barriers to partnering with other funders by ensuring that each funder can identify their contribution and impact  To increase our understanding of potential use of OVC support/partners in reaching OVCs with health June 2011 January 2010 interventions, referral systems and monitoring of impact www.abtassociates.com

×