Electricity

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Electricity

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Electricity

  1. 1. Electricity SNC1D0
  2. 2. What is electricity? <ul><li>Electricity is the energy generated from the transfer of electrons </li></ul><ul><li>Electrons are located on the outside of atoms, and can easily move in or out of atoms </li></ul>
  3. 3. Electric Charges <ul><li>When objects have no loss or gain of electrons, they can be considered “neutral” </li></ul><ul><li>When an object gains electrons, it becomes “negatively” charged </li></ul><ul><li>When an object loses electrons, it becomes “positively” charged </li></ul>
  4. 4. Law of Electric Charges <ul><li>“ Like charges repel one another, and unlike charges attract one another.” </li></ul><ul><li>An object with opposite charges will attract each other </li></ul><ul><li>A charged object and a neutral object will attract each other </li></ul><ul><li>Same charged objects repel each other </li></ul><ul><li>Neutral objects have no effect on each other </li></ul>
  5. 5. Types of Electricity <ul><li>There are 2 main forms of electricity </li></ul><ul><li>Static electricity refers to when electrons are built up on an object </li></ul><ul><li>Current electricity refers to a flow of electrons </li></ul>
  6. 6. Conductors and Insulators <ul><li>Conductors are materials that allow electrons to flow freely through them (metals) </li></ul><ul><li>Insulators are materials that do not allow easy flow of electrons (rubber, plastics) </li></ul>
  7. 7. Static Electricity <ul><li>Static electricity can be generated through a variety of ways: </li></ul><ul><li>Friction - electrons rub onto another object </li></ul><ul><li>Contact - electrons jump onto another object </li></ul>
  8. 8. Electrostatics <ul><li>Electrostatics refers to the ability for something to hold onto electrons, the study of static electricity </li></ul><ul><li>Something with a greater hold on electrons can “steal” electrons from something with a weaker hold </li></ul><ul><li>(Weak hold of electrons) </li></ul><ul><li>Acetate </li></ul><ul><li>Glass </li></ul><ul><li>Wool </li></ul><ul><li>Cat fur, human hair </li></ul><ul><li>Calcium, magnesium, lead </li></ul><ul><li>Silk </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum, zinc </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton </li></ul><ul><li>Parafin wax </li></ul><ul><li>Ebonite </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon, copper, nickel </li></ul><ul><li>Rubber </li></ul><ul><li>Sulphur </li></ul><ul><li>Platinum, gold </li></ul><ul><li>(strong hold on electrons) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Electrostatics <ul><li>Example: </li></ul><ul><li>If you rub a glass rod with a piece of silk, the electrons go to the silk from the glass </li></ul><ul><li>The silk becomes negatively charged </li></ul><ul><li>The glass becomes positively charged </li></ul><ul><li>(Weak hold of electrons) </li></ul><ul><li>Acetate </li></ul><ul><li>Glass </li></ul><ul><li>Wool </li></ul><ul><li>Cat fur, human hair </li></ul><ul><li>Calcium, magnesium, lead </li></ul><ul><li>Silk </li></ul><ul><li>Aluminum, zinc </li></ul><ul><li>Cotton </li></ul><ul><li>Parafin wax </li></ul><ul><li>Ebonite </li></ul><ul><li>Plastic </li></ul><ul><li>Carbon, copper, nickel </li></ul><ul><li>Rubber </li></ul><ul><li>Sulphur </li></ul><ul><li>Platinum, gold </li></ul><ul><li>(strong hold on electrons) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Charging by Contact <ul><li>When a charged object touches a neutral object, it becomes charged as well </li></ul><ul><li>Example: When you touch a charged sphere, the electrons jump into your body and charge your hair </li></ul>
  11. 11. Method of Creating Static Charges
  12. 12. Current Electricity <ul><li>Current electricity refers to a flow of electrons </li></ul><ul><li>A continuous source of electrons flow from one place to another </li></ul>

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