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The Big Hack and Purple Pound - Scope

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Presented at TechShare Pro 2019, London

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The Big Hack and Purple Pound - Scope

  1. 1. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design
  2. 2. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design The Big Hack and Purple Pound - Scope Craig Moss • Research Manager • Scope 20 Nov | 11.30 AM Anel Touchet • Senior Economist • Scope 20 Nov | 11.30 AM
  3. 3. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design The Big Hack: Inclusive Design Business Case Anel Touchet, Senior Economist Craig Moss, Research Manager
  4. 4. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Inclusive Design for all Aims  Explore the business case for inclusive design  Introduce the benefits of inclusive design, and the costs of inaccessible design to businesses and society  Demystify the implementation of inclusive design  Offer ongoing resources and practical support to businesses and designers
  5. 5. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Inclusive Design for all Why this is important?  Inclusive design matters to everyone  Relevant to businesses and all of wider society –  including disabled people across the spectrum of disabilities  An important part of ID is accessibility (both physical and digital)
  6. 6. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Disability prevalence in regions of the UK An untapped market Region/Country Millions of people % of people North East 0.6 25 North West 1.6 23 Yorkshire and the Humber 1.2 23 East Midlands 1.0 22 West Midlands 1.2 21 East of England 1.2 20 London 1.2 13 South East 1.7 20 South West 1.1 20 Wales 0.8 25 Scotland 1.2 23 Northern Ireland 0.4 21
  7. 7. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design An untapped market Disabled people in the UK • 1 in 5 people are disabled* in the UK • 13.3 million disabled people • 11 million households • 40% of households have at least one disabled person Source: ONS, Family Resource Survey, 2017/18 *Equality Act 2010 definition
  8. 8. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design • Aggregate income (after housing cost) of households with at least one disabled person • Proxy for purchasing power Purple Pound An untapped market
  9. 9. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Two research questions 1- How do households with disabled people spend? 2- What’s the role of ID and accessibility in spending decisions? Mix of primary and secondary research Research
  10. 10. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  Quantitative research of secondary data  Representative national datasets over 20k respondents  Average weekly spend by categories, impairment types, income, age and gender  Compare spending patterns of households with disabled people vs households without. How do households with disabled people spend? Inclusive design & spending decisions
  11. 11. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Inclusive design & spending decisions
  12. 12. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Underspend 1- Education (-65%) 2- Public Transport (-31%) 3- Entertainment (-25%) 4- Hotels and accommodations (-20%) Overspend 1- Personal transport (+33%) 2- Personal care products & services (+23%) How do households with disabled people spend? Inclusive design and spending decisions
  13. 13. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  Co-designed the “Buying habits and your disability” survey  Panel of 234 disabled adults  Representative of national population  Isolate the impact of inaccessible design on spending decisions What’s the role of ID in spending decisions? Inclusive design and spending decisions
  14. 14. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design • 18-20: 2% of respondents • 20-34: 29% • 35-49: 24% • 50-64: 25% • 65-74: 15% • 75-84: 5% • 85+: <1% Survey demographic - age Inclusive design and spending decisions
  15. 15. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Impairment types Mobility 45% Dexterity 27% Mental health 27% Stamina, breathing, fatigue 26% Vision 25% Hearing 21% Learning, understanding, concentrating 17% Memory 16% Social/ behavioural 11% Other 10%
  16. 16. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  75 % of respondents think businesses are losing out Do you think businesses are losing out by not having an inclusive customer offer? Inclusive design and spending decisions I would like to spend more than I currently do, but I can't because it's such a laborious task. If websites/apps and stores were more accessible, then I’d spend more because I'd have no restrictions. The PP is worth a lot, but businesses don’t seem to realise this and put the effort in to make their products and websites accessible in order to benefit from the purple pound."
  17. 17. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Inclusive design and spending decisions Top three responses:  50% of respondents chose not to buy the item  48% found an alternative provider to buy the item more easily  32% asked someone in their household to complete the purchase for them Feedback about digital experiences
  18. 18. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design I really, really wanted to buy tickets to go to the football for a big match. The timeout clock [on the website] kept finishing before I did. It was too hard. I ended up not going. There is an untapped market. Most VI people shop online, if websites were more accessible, more VI people would spend their money and companies would make more money
  19. 19. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design I really, really wanted to buy tickets to go to the football for a big match. The timeout clock [on the website] kept finishing before I did. It was too hard. I ended up not going. Feedback about digital experiences
  20. 20. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design “In the past year, have you had a poor in-person experience in any of the categories below because your needs as a disabled person were not met, making it hard to use or buy/justify those things?” Feedback about offline experiences Inclusive design and spending decisions
  21. 21. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design
  22. 22. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design
  23. 23. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  Households with disabled people spend 65% less than their non- disabled counterparts  33 % would spend more on education but are prevented to do so because of accessibility issues  Spending on education includes school fees and trips, college and university fees, conferences Markets analysis – Education Inclusive design and spending decisions …if I was assured the learning resources/course was truly accessible, I would be more likely to partake in extra education.”
  24. 24. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  Households with disabled people spend 31% less than counterparts  On average, 22% want to spend more on public transport but are prevented to do so because of accessibility issues Markets analysis – Public Transport Inclusive design and spending decisions My worst experiences with accessibility have been with public transport… which is the most important thing to someone with a disability... I would be happiest to spend more money on if it was more accessible.”
  25. 25. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design  Households with disabled people spend 25% less than counterparts  67 % want to spend more on entertainment but are prevented to do so because of accessibility issues Markets analysis – Entertainment Inclusive design and spending decisions
  26. 26. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Source: Scope Intelligence Unlocking the Purple Pound potential
  27. 27. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design In-person: Inclusive Design easy fixes • Physical access – shop steps; wider aisles; accessible routes; lifts • Paying experience – lower tills; payment access • Store environment – noise levels; light levels; accessible zones • Store support – staff training; shopper guides • Accessible shopping sessions/events Simple implementation of ID
  28. 28. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Telephone: Inclusive Design easy fixes • Navigation – less voice operated; less complicated menus • Communication – speaking too fast; repeat information if necessary • Assumptions – reading; slower speech • Accessible services – training and support for text relay calls • Flexibility – divert from the script; online offers available Simple implementation of ID
  29. 29. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Online: Inclusive Design easy fixes • Text – clear language and font; colour contrasts • Navigation – tabbing; larger buttons; alternatives to drag and drop • Images – alternative text descriptions; CAPTCHA security • Communication – captions; sign language • Timeout – Remove time limits or allow the user to extend them Simple implementation of ID
  30. 30. The Future of Accessibility and Inclusive Design Online resources available from Scope • Informed, inspire, implement, improve • Resource library • Business case and reporting tool • Please sign up at: https://www.bighack.org/ @scopebighack The Big Hack

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