Brassaï (Gyula Halász)
(1899 - 1984)
Brassaï (pseudonym of Gyula Halász) was a Hungarian photographer, sculptor,
and filmmaker who rose to international fame i...
History
• Gyula Halász was born in Brassó, Transylvania, Kingdom of Hungary ,
to an Armenian mother and a Hungarian father...
Photography

• He would spend quite a bit of time wandering the streets of Paris
taking pictures of the night scene. He wo...
• He was also interested in Paris high society spending much of his
efforts photographing ballets, portraits of intellectu...
• A master of light, shadow and atmosphere, Brassai often chose to
focus on the set pieces of the City of light, creating ...
Way of Capturing Photos

• He focused his small plate camera on a tripod, opened the shutter
when ready, and fired a flash...
Camera used

• He studied technique, and used an eccentric collection of plate
cameras, even after the 35mm Leica became t...
Career

• He began work for Harper's Bazaar in 1937, and he supplied that
magazine with many photographic essays famous li...
• In 1962, after the death of Carmel Snow, the publisher of Harper's
Bazaar, Brassai gave up photography altogether. From ...
Books

Henry Miller: The Paris Years, Arcade Publishing, 1975
Letters to My Parents, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago
Pr...
Thank you
ABHISHEK SINGH
FC SEMIII
Brassai (gyula halasz)
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Brassai (gyula halasz)

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Brassai (gyula halasz) , a photographer specialized in Night Photography.

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Brassai (gyula halasz)

  1. 1. Brassaï (Gyula Halász) (1899 - 1984)
  2. 2. Brassaï (pseudonym of Gyula Halász) was a Hungarian photographer, sculptor, and filmmaker who rose to international fame in France in the 20th century. He was one of the numerous Hungarian artists who flourished in Paris beginning between the World Wars. In the early 21st century, the discovery of more than 200 letters and hundreds of drawings and other items from the period 1940–1984 has provided scholars with material for understanding his later life and career.
  3. 3. History • Gyula Halász was born in Brassó, Transylvania, Kingdom of Hungary , to an Armenian mother and a Hungarian father. He grew up speaking Hungarian. When he was three, his family lived in Paris for a year, while his father, a professor of French literature, taught at the Sorbonne. • As a young man, Gyula Halász studied painting and sculpture at the Hungarian Academy of Fine Arts in Budapest. He joined a cavalry regiment of the Austro-Hungarian army, where he served until the end of the First World War.
  4. 4. Photography • He would spend quite a bit of time wandering the streets of Paris taking pictures of the night scene. He would take pictures of both people and deserted streets and squares.
  5. 5. • He was also interested in Paris high society spending much of his efforts photographing ballets, portraits of intellectuals and operas.
  6. 6. • A master of light, shadow and atmosphere, Brassai often chose to focus on the set pieces of the City of light, creating memorable and lyrical images of its monuments, bridges and boulevards.
  7. 7. Way of Capturing Photos • He focused his small plate camera on a tripod, opened the shutter when ready, and fired a flashbulb. • He posed his cafe pictures, having his subject wait while an assistant set up a reflecting screen and then held the flash powder that explode into the light that produced softer edges than flashbulbs .
  8. 8. Camera used • He studied technique, and used an eccentric collection of plate cameras, even after the 35mm Leica became the chosen camera of photographers with similar interests. • Brassai's first camera was Voigtlander Bergheil and later a Rolleiflex.
  9. 9. Career • He began work for Harper's Bazaar in 1937, and he supplied that magazine with many photographic essays famous literary personalities and artists.
  10. 10. • In 1962, after the death of Carmel Snow, the publisher of Harper's Bazaar, Brassai gave up photography altogether. From then on, he kept busy making new prints of his photographs and new additions of his early books.
  11. 11. Books Henry Miller: The Paris Years, Arcade Publishing, 1975 Letters to My Parents, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1997 Conversations with Picasso, Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 1999
  12. 12. Thank you ABHISHEK SINGH FC SEMIII

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