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finalppt phy..pptx

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finalppt phy..pptx

  1. 1. INDIVIDUAL ASSIGNMENT OF THE COURSE EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY BY; ABDETA BIRHANU
  2. 2. NERVOUS SYSTEM RESPONSE TO EXERCISE
  3. 3.  The nervous system is the major controlling, regulatory, and communicating system in the body. This system sends messages back and forth between the brain and the body.  It is the center of all mental activity including thought, learning, and memory.  Together with the endocrine system, the nervous system is responsible for regulating and maintaining homeostasis.
  4. 4. 1. Sensory 2. Integrative 3. Motor
  5. 5.  Sensory input comes from the many sensory receptors that monitor changes occurring both inside and outside the body.  The total sum of the information gathered by these receptors is called sensory input.
  6. 6.  At a more integrative level, the primary function of the nervous system is to control and communicate information throughout the body.  It does this by extracting information from the environment using sensory receptors.
  7. 7.  Once the response is activated, the nervous system sends signals via motor output to muscles or glands to initiate the response.
  8. 8.  The central nervous system and  The peripheral nervous system. They have two different purposes but work in collaboration together.
  9. 9.  The brain, the spinal cord, and the nerves of the body, make up the central nervous system.  This system controls the majority of the functions of both the body and the mind.
  10. 10. The brain  The brain is made up of different parts. These include the cerebrum, the cerebellum, the thalamus, the hypothalamus and the brainstem.  It controls intelligence, memory, personality, emotion, speech, and ability to feel and move.
  11. 11. The spinal cord  Is an extension of the brain.  It carries messages to and from the brain via the network of peripheral nerves connected to it. Nerves  Also connect the spinal cord to a part of the brain called the brainstem.
  12. 12.  The peripheral nervous system is made up of all of the nerves and nerve cells that are external to the central nervous system.  The function of the peripheral nervous system is to relay information from the central nervous system to the rest of the body, and from the body back to the central nervous system.
  13. 13. 1. Autonomic nervous system (ANS): Controls involuntary bodily functions and regulates glands.  Certain essential processes in the body are regulated by the autonomic nervous system, such as blood pressure and the rate at which we breathe.  Somatic nervous system (SNS): Controls muscle movement and relays information from ears, eyes and skin to the CNS.
  14. 14.  The sympathetic nervous system activates what is often known as the fight or flight response. This basically refers to how the body deals with stressful situations .  The parasympathetic nervous system, on the other hand, is referred to as the rest and digest system. It helps the body to conserve energy by slowing the heart rate, increasing gland activity, and relaxing the muscles.
  15. 15.  Nerves are collections of specialized cells known as neurons.  The nerves carry signals from one area of the body to another.  There are three different types of neuron, and each has a unique function of its own. A. Sensory neurons, B. Relay neurons, and C. Motor neurons
  16. 16.  Sensory neurons take signals to the brain and the spinal cord all the way from our sensory receptors.  The sensory receptors are cells in the body that can detect changes in the external environment, prompting them to send electrical impulses to the relevant area for a response.
  17. 17. Relay Neurons  The relay neurons are responsible for carrying messages from different parts of the central nervous system to another. Motor Neurons  Motor neurons are responsible for taking messages from the central nervous system to the parts of the body that need to receive that signal, such as muscles or glands.
  18. 18.  Recovery advantages to those who have had their motor functions affected by illness or injury.  The short-term effects of exercise on the nervous system are primarily in relation to the neurotransmitters. • Signals are sent through the neutrons in the brain and hereby the potential to retain information begins to develop.
  19. 19.  The long-term effects are more concerned with how pathways for oxygen are enhanced, and how muscle growth is stimulated. • Aerobic exercise is thought to be the most beneficial type of exercise. • Fantastic aerobic exercises to try are running, cycling, rowing, swimming, and jumping rope.  However, regular physical exercise is shown to lower activity of the sympathetic nervous system, and encourages activity of the parasympathetic nervous system instead.
  20. 20. 1. Required for Neurological Development 2. Neuroplasticity 3. Coordination and Spatial Orientation 5. Mood Regulation and Self Confidence 6. Improves Sleep and Brain Toxin Removal 7. Enhances Immune Function 8. Lowers and Improves Resilience towards Stress, Tension and Anxiety
  21. 21.  Get a Good Mix of Exercise Types  Exercise as Regularly as Possible, For as Long as Possible  Try NotA To Overdo It  Avoid Exercise 1 Hour Before Bed Time
  22. 22. Conclusion  Regular exercise is vital for health and well-being.  This is especially true of the cardiovascular system and the nervous system, which are enhanced the most by the benefits of exercise.
  23. 23. References 1) https://www.livescience.com/22665- nervous-system.html AUTONOMIC CELLS EXERCISE FITNESS NERV ES NERVOUS SYSTEM NEURONS SOMATIC 2) Top doctors Sports Physiology Available from: https://www.topdoctors.co.uk/medi cal-dictionary/sport-physiology (accessed 26.3.2021)
  24. 24. 3) Meeusen R, DeMeirlier K: Exercise and brain neurotransmission.Sports Med 1995, 20:160–188. Cited Here 4) Groves PM, Rebec GV: Organization of the nervous system.Introduction to Biological Psychology, edn
  25. 25. 3) Meeusen R, DeMeirlier K: Exercise and brain neurotransmission.Sports Med 1995, 20:160–188. Cited Here 4) Groves PM, Rebec GV: Organization of the nervous system.Introduction to Biological Psychology, edn

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