Drama:<br />What is Drama<br />
What is drama?<br />Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a story enacted on stage for a live ...
What is drama?<br />The term comes from a Greek word (dran) meaning "action" which is derived from "to do“.  <br />
The Nature of Drama<br />A drama is the imitation of a complete action, adapted to the sympathetic attention of man, devel...
Drama & Life<br />The drama in general is a reflex of life. The truth of this is to be found in the literature of any peop...
Drama & Man<br />The drama deals with men. It requires spectators, and is addressed to the eye, the ear, and the moral nat...
Drama production & Reception<br />The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, pr...
Drama production & Reception<br />The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influence...
The dramatic mode<br />Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and...
The dramatic mode<br />Drama was considered a genre of poetry by the ancient Greeks.  <br />Aristotle offered drama as a g...
The dramatic mode<br />The early modern tragedy Hamlet (1601) by Shakespeare and the classical Athenian tragedy Oedipus th...
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What is drama

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What is drama

  1. 1. Drama:<br />What is Drama<br />
  2. 2. What is drama?<br />Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a story enacted on stage for a live audience.<br />
  3. 3. What is drama?<br />The term comes from a Greek word (dran) meaning "action" which is derived from "to do“.  <br />
  4. 4. The Nature of Drama<br />A drama is the imitation of a complete action, adapted to the sympathetic attention of man, developed in a succession of continuously interesting and continuously related incidents, acted and expressed by means of speech and the symbols, actualities, and conditions of life. <br />
  5. 5. Drama & Life<br />The drama in general is a reflex of life. The truth of this is to be found in the literature of any people, for in this form in proportion to its development are embodied sentiment and manners. The playwright may treat his theme as he may, with idealism or realism, and there yet remains in his work something of his time. <br />
  6. 6. Drama & Man<br />The drama deals with men. It requires spectators, and is addressed to the eye, the ear, and the moral nature. It is a form of literature and of entertainment into which all human emotions and experience may be translated under certain conditions. <br />
  7. 7. Drama production & Reception<br />The enactment of drama in theatre, performed by actors on a stage before an audience, presupposes collaborative modes of production and a collective form of reception. <br />
  8. 8. Drama production & Reception<br />The structure of dramatic texts, unlike other forms of literature, is directly influenced by this collaborative production and collective reception. <br />
  9. 9. The dramatic mode<br />Considered as a genre of poetry in general, the dramatic mode has been contrasted with the epic and the lyrical modes ever since Aristotle's Poetics(c. 335 BC)—the earliest work of dramatic theory.<br />
  10. 10. The dramatic mode<br />Drama was considered a genre of poetry by the ancient Greeks. <br />Aristotle offered drama as a general term to describe forms of poetry that were acted. <br />The Roman writer Horace stated that the purpose of drama was either to delight (comedy) or instruct(tragedy). <br />
  11. 11. The dramatic mode<br />The early modern tragedy Hamlet (1601) by Shakespeare and the classical Athenian tragedy Oedipus the King (c. 429 BC) by Sophocles are among the supreme masterpieces of the art of drama.<br />

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