Architecture 100 Introduction to Enterprise Architecture
Course Topics <ul><li>EA and buried treasure </li></ul><ul><li>EA’s payoff </li></ul><ul><li>A tour of the diggings; what’...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Course Topic 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Deep in the layers of organizational structure lie potenti...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Enterprise Architecture (EA) Definition </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprise  Your business; whatev...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>…  agency executives have historically not understood the purpose, content, and value of th...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Try it before you buy </li></ul><ul><li>EA is not “all or nothing” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Further, skilled human capital in the discipline of enterprise architecture is a scarce res...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>What drives EA </li></ul><ul><li>We are spending millions collecting data artifacts which w...
EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Why is EA different from past efforts? </li></ul><ul><li>Response to GAO report of “immatur...
EA’s Payoff <ul><li>Course Topic 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Why EA is valuable. </li></ul>
EA’s Payoff <ul><li>What’s valuable about EA? </li></ul><ul><li>To improve a complex organization, first you have to under...
EA’s Payoff <ul><li>I think a lot more decisions are made on serendipity than people think. Things come across their radar...
EA’s Payoff Benefits <ul><li>Improves service to citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces duplication of effort </li></ul><ul><l...
EA’s Payoff <ul><li>EA saves money by showing true costs </li></ul><ul><li>EA shows the big picture, total cost of operati...
EA’s Payoff
EA’s Payoff <ul><li>Results of EA  </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection and reporting standardized across the Interior </li><...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Course Topic 3 </li></ul><ul><li>An overview of what’s happening in EA. </...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Concepts and projects:  </li></ul><ul><li>Lines of business </li></ul><ul>...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Lines of business </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative way to look at Interior st...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Lines of business (continued) </li></ul><ul><li>Over 20 lines of business ...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Phases of an EA effort: </li></ul><ul><li>Envision the future architecture...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>In academic science, interdisciplinary work is productive and praised, but...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>DEAR (DOI Enterprise Architecture Repository) </li></ul><ul><li>One data s...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>There has been a lot of talk lately about the burdens of the Presidency. D...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Bunch of boxes and arrows portraying the archit...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Bureau efforts   </li></ul><ul><li>MMS, BLM, and USGS are well underway wi...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>[Urging the national government] to eradicate local prejudices and mistake...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Models  </li></ul><ul><li>Interior E...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>…  [EA should] be treated as a funding priority and [needs to] overcome th...
A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>EA in government and industry  </li></ul><ul><li>DOD is a leader in EA; ma...
Conclusion <ul><li>Course Topic 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Summary and references. </li></ul>
Conclusion <ul><li>EA is needed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get good business cases through faster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
For More Information: Contacts and References <ul><li>Colleen Coggins—Interior Chief Architect, (202)208-5911,  [email_add...
EA Glossary <ul><li>A-130  Circular A-130, Management of Federal Information Resources.  See  http://www.whitehouse.gov/om...
EA Glossary <ul><li>IDEF0  A type of diagram used in activity modeling; shows the inputs, outputs, controls, and mechanism...
Document Abstract Revision History S:DearIBAWIPCommunicationsArchitecture Curriculum finals (sent to Colleen)Architecture ...
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DRAFT Architecture 100 Introduction to Enterprise Architecture

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DRAFT Architecture 100 Introduction to Enterprise Architecture

  1. 1. Architecture 100 Introduction to Enterprise Architecture
  2. 2. Course Topics <ul><li>EA and buried treasure </li></ul><ul><li>EA’s payoff </li></ul><ul><li>A tour of the diggings; what’s going on </li></ul><ul><li>Conclusion </li></ul>
  3. 3. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Course Topic 1 </li></ul><ul><li>Deep in the layers of organizational structure lie potential savings. EA is your metal detector. </li></ul>
  4. 4. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Enterprise Architecture (EA) Definition </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprise Your business; whatever it is you’re doing. Can be an organization (for instance, DOI or MMS) or it can be one line of business (fighting wildfires) that cuts across several organizations </li></ul><ul><li>Architecture The structure or structural description of your business </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprise architecture (EA) The structural description of your business </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Can be in the form of models, diagrams, or text </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Describes how the enterprise operates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How business processes and rules relate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How information flows </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Where work happens </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who the users are </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What hardware, software, data, and security is used for the business </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>First step is to evaluate the existing EA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Second step is to decide what EA the business needs for the future </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Modernization blueprint Plan for a future EA </li></ul>
  5. 5. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>… agency executives have historically not understood the purpose, content, and value of these architectures… </li></ul><ul><li>— GAO Report to Congressional Committees, February 2002 </li></ul>Executives need to understand EA, and make an informed decision whether to support or reject it
  6. 6. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Try it before you buy </li></ul><ul><li>EA is not “all or nothing” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>No need for sight unseen investment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highest yields are from the longest-term investments </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>But there are also gold nuggets just lying around—”somebody else’s problem” improvements that everyone agrees on, but nobody has fixed </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EA makes recommendations. Managers weigh potential improvements against funding, and decide how far to go </li></ul>
  7. 7. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Further, skilled human capital in the discipline of enterprise architecture is a scarce resource. </li></ul><ul><li>— GAO Report to Congressional Committees, February 2002 </li></ul>To succeed, EA needs the support of executives who understand what it’s for.
  8. 8. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>What drives EA </li></ul><ul><li>We are spending millions collecting data artifacts which we are not using effectively </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EA models and analysis help you understand the data and use it to make decisions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Money spent on data collection is wasted without the investment in EA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Like buying a top-of –the-line computer; it is wasted unless you also invest in a little electricity to power it </li></ul></ul><ul><li>OMB’s EA push means everyone in the government has the same goal to shoot for </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easier to talk and share data with other organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Literally gives organizations the same vocabulary </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Stop IT investments growing like a fungus; get investments in line with our mission </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ Whiz-bang” is not the right reason to invest </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We need solid business analysis to base our IT choices on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>We need long-term cost-effectiveness </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EA will speed good business cases through and stop bad ones early on </li></ul><ul><li>EA will help with other initiatives </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Security </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Asset management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Configuration management </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. EA and Buried Treasure <ul><li>Why is EA different from past efforts? </li></ul><ul><li>Response to GAO report of “immature” federal EA programs </li></ul><ul><ul><li>OMB oversight increased </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>OMB is also looking deeper into programs </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Answer to personnel cuts from OMB workforce planning </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Organizations have to do more with less </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Answer to “retirement bubble” in some areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Corporate memory is lost when many retire at the same time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Objective view of business </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EA team is outside the other organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Response to faster technology development </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology is also outdated faster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technology decisions must be both quick and correct </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Driven by business, not flashy technology </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get the latest gadget, you have to show a business need </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. EA’s Payoff <ul><li>Course Topic 2 </li></ul><ul><li>Why EA is valuable. </li></ul>
  11. 11. EA’s Payoff <ul><li>What’s valuable about EA? </li></ul><ul><li>To improve a complex organization, first you have to understand it. </li></ul><ul><li>EA highlights what’s important </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Models the organization before and after the improvement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shows inefficiencies and redundancies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gives recommendations, risks, costs, and benefits </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shows where local efficiencies cause national inefficiencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Result of penny-wise, pound-foolish decisions </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>EA shows the overall most efficient solution </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Decision-makers can base decisions on facts, not anecdotes </li></ul>
  12. 12. EA’s Payoff <ul><li>I think a lot more decisions are made on serendipity than people think. Things come across their radar screens and they jump at them. </li></ul><ul><li>— Jay W Lorsch, professor, Harvard Business School </li></ul><ul><li>EA prioritizes what comes across decision-makers’ radar screens, and gives them facts for decisions </li></ul>
  13. 13. EA’s Payoff Benefits <ul><li>Improves service to citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces duplication of effort </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces cost of services </li></ul><ul><li>Improves service to citizens </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces duplication of effort </li></ul><ul><li>Preserves time and funding for core mission </li></ul><ul><li>Measures progress toward better EA </li></ul><ul><li>Improves customer service </li></ul><ul><li>Preserves time and funding for core mission </li></ul><ul><li>Measures progress toward better EA </li></ul><ul><li>Improves customer service </li></ul><ul><li>Preserves time and funding for core mission </li></ul>Long Term <ul><li>Streamlines government business </li></ul><ul><li>Improves public perception of government </li></ul><ul><li>Allows pieces of the architecture to be used across the government </li></ul><ul><li>Produces plans for future EA </li></ul><ul><li>Fits department into overall federal plan </li></ul><ul><li>Improves budget planning </li></ul><ul><li>Produces plans for future EA </li></ul><ul><li>Produces plans for funding </li></ul><ul><li>Fits portfolio into overall department plan </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces O&M costs </li></ul><ul><li>Produces plans for future EA </li></ul><ul><li>Produces plans for funding </li></ul><ul><li>Fits system into overall portfolio plan </li></ul><ul><li>Reduces O&M cost </li></ul>Medium Term <ul><li>Produces snapshot of all federal systems </li></ul><ul><li>Makes budget decisions easier </li></ul><ul><li>Presents picture of funding allocations </li></ul><ul><li>Produces current department snapshot </li></ul><ul><li>Compares department against OMB initiatives </li></ul><ul><li>Justifies spending </li></ul><ul><li>Measures systems </li></ul><ul><li>Produces current portfolio snapshot </li></ul><ul><li>Shows priority of issues </li></ul><ul><li>Improves systems information </li></ul><ul><li>Improves team communication </li></ul><ul><li>Justifies spending </li></ul><ul><li>Produces current system snapshot </li></ul><ul><li>Makes issues more visible </li></ul><ul><li>Improves team communication </li></ul><ul><li>Shows short-term solutions </li></ul><ul><li>Justifies spending </li></ul>Short Term OMB Department Portfolio System
  14. 14. EA’s Payoff <ul><li>EA saves money by showing true costs </li></ul><ul><li>EA shows the big picture, total cost of operations (TCO), not just the immediate price </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost of maintenance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost of incompatibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost of duplication </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost of effort spent on non-mission tasks </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. EA’s Payoff
  16. 16. EA’s Payoff <ul><li>Results of EA </li></ul><ul><li>Data collection and reporting standardized across the Interior </li></ul><ul><li>Interior in line with OMB funding requirements </li></ul><ul><li>Interior in line with federal EA guidance </li></ul><ul><li>EA improves customer service </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Data compatibility allows more one-stop shops </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Less customer confusion at finding similar businesses in different organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Streamlined business helps customer ask the right office the right question the first time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Long-term vision of EA: use related money to buy related items </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Example: Quit sending money to many agencies to do the same recreation job many different ways </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Use recreation money for the recreation line of business, with the same standards, whatever agency it shows up in (see http:// www.recreation.gov ) </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Course Topic 3 </li></ul><ul><li>An overview of what’s happening in EA. </li></ul>
  18. 18. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Concepts and projects: </li></ul><ul><li>Lines of business </li></ul><ul><li>Phases of an EA effort </li></ul><ul><li>DEAR </li></ul><ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Bureau efforts </li></ul><ul><li>FEA models </li></ul><ul><li>EA in government and industry </li></ul>
  19. 19. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Lines of business </li></ul><ul><li>Alternative way to look at Interior structure </li></ul><ul><li>Looks at the job instead of the organization </li></ul><ul><li>For instance: many bureaus manage finances (everyone has to do paychecks!) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>EA looks at all the financial management programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Finds the best program that will work for all organizations </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Standardizes all the programs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saves money </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Bulk buys of technology </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Technology, data, and training is interchangeable between organizations </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Better management of technology updates </li></ul></ul></ul>Many agencies, one business: law enforcement
  20. 20. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Lines of business (continued) </li></ul><ul><li>Over 20 lines of business have been identified </li></ul><ul><li>FY04: EA team is starting with </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Law enforcement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fighting wildfires </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Financial management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indian Trust </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recreation </li></ul></ul>
  21. 21. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Phases of an EA effort: </li></ul><ul><li>Envision the future architecture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Sketch out what the organization will need </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Determine scope, collect data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Interview system experts to find out how they do their job, and analyze the findings </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Align Interior architecture with federal architecture </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Compare what Interior is doing with the FEA reference models </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Build modernization blueprints, at tactical and strategic levels </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tactical blueprint is a road map to short-term savings (for instance, on project management) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strategic blueprint is a road map to long-term savings (for instance, on investments and business cases) </li></ul></ul>Phase 2 Mining for data
  22. 22. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>In academic science, interdisciplinary work is productive and praised, but is relatively rare. Scientists don’t need to cooperate to have their results fit together: they are all describing different parts of the same thing—nature—so in the long run, their results tend to come together into a single picture. </li></ul><ul><li>Engineering, however, is different. Because it is more creative (it actually creates complex things), it demands more attention to teamwork. If the finished parts are going to work together, they must be developed by groups that share a common picture of what each part must accomplish. Engineers in different disciplines are forced to communicate; the challenge of management and team-building is to make that communication happen. </li></ul><ul><li>— K. Eric Drexler, U.S. researcher, lecturer </li></ul>EA gives different groups a common picture of the overall mission and how each piece of work fits into it.
  23. 23. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>DEAR (DOI Enterprise Architecture Repository) </li></ul><ul><li>One data store for Interior and its bureaus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>About 800 systems so far </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Follows structure of FEA reference models </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Solves problem of many disconnected stores of related data across the Interior </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Data comes in from many places in many forms, but analysts can get to it all with one query </li></ul>
  24. 24. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>There has been a lot of talk lately about the burdens of the Presidency. Decisions that the President has to make often affect the lives of tens of millions of people around the world, but that does not mean that they should take longer to make. </li></ul><ul><li>— Harry S. Truman </li></ul>EA decreases the need for data calls; it gives decision-makers usable information at the time of the decision.
  25. 25. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Modeling </li></ul><ul><li>Bunch of boxes and arrows portraying the architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Visual description of how work is done </li></ul><ul><li>Points out the complications in a process </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Tool for showing flow of events and duplications or inefficiencies </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reveals roles and responsibilities </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Bureau efforts </li></ul><ul><li>MMS, BLM, and USGS are well underway with EA work </li></ul><ul><li>Interior EA work will help standardize bureau efforts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Complements, rather than replaces, bureau EA </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reduces total cost of EA: methods get paid for once at Interior level, then used by all bureaus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interior EA will follow federal guidance, bureau EAs will follow Interior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interior EA will use best practices, lessons learned, and data from bureau EA efforts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scope of bureau work will be clearer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Interior EA will be mapped to specific structure of each bureau </li></ul><ul><ul><li>That information gets mapped to the structure the Interior needs for managing resources </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Interior information gets mapped into what the OMB needs </li></ul></ul>
  27. 27. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>[Urging the national government] to eradicate local prejudices and mistaken rivalships to consolidate the affairs of the states into one harmonious interest. </li></ul><ul><li>— James Madison (1751–1836), U.S. president </li></ul>EA unites business across bureaus, across departments, and across the federal government.
  28. 28. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>Federal Enterprise Architecture (FEA) Models </li></ul><ul><li>Interior EA follows federal guidance and uses FEA models </li></ul><ul><li>Templates for all federal government EA </li></ul><ul><li>Creates one vocabulary for federal EA </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Easy to share data, concepts, products, information </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Five models, to describe different levels: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Performance Reference Model (PRM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Business Reference Model (BRM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Service Component Reference Model (SRM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Technical Reference Model (TRM) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Data Reference Model (DRM) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>More details at http://www.feapmo.gov </li></ul>
  29. 29. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>… [EA should] be treated as a funding priority and [needs to] overcome the embedded cultural resistance to the non-parochial, entitywide approach that enterprise architectures promote. </li></ul><ul><li>— GAO Report to Congressional Committees, February 2002 </li></ul><ul><li>EA helps agencies share data and technology with other agencies, and it helps the federal government understand and approve of where its money goes. </li></ul>
  30. 30. A Tour of the Diggings; What’s Going On <ul><li>EA in government and industry </li></ul><ul><li>DOD is a leader in EA; may be the only government agency more complex than Interior </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Complexity comes from different parts of an organization doing the same business </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>http:// www.defenselink.mil/comptroller/bmmp/pages/arch_home.html </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Several state governments have websites about their EA efforts </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Kentucky EA http:// enterpriseit.ky.gov / </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virginia EA http:// www.cots.state.va.us/EA/eaabout.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Industry and universities are also involved </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Stanford University EA http:// www.stanford.edu /group/APS/arch/ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>University of Iowa enterprise security architecture http:// www.its.uiowa.edu/cio/itsecurity/resources/esa.htm </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. Conclusion <ul><li>Course Topic 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Summary and references. </li></ul>
  32. 32. Conclusion <ul><li>EA is needed </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To get good business cases through faster </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To do more with less </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To make use of our collected data </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EA is valuable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gives a return on investment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Highlights inefficiency, recommends ways to be more efficient </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saves money: looks at the big picture as well as immediate savings </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Recommends investing in what’s needed, not what’s flashy </li></ul></ul><ul><li>EA is required </li></ul><ul><ul><li>For OMB funding </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>To work with other departments </li></ul></ul>
  33. 33. For More Information: Contacts and References <ul><li>Colleen Coggins—Interior Chief Architect, (202)208-5911, [email_address] </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Jim Johnson—Interior Business Architecture (IBA) Contract Team Lead, (202)452-7733, [email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Jim Barrett—IBA Contract Technical Lead, (303)236-5353, [email_address] </li></ul></ul><ul><li>More EA information: </li></ul><ul><li>A Practical Guide to Federal Enterprise Architecture http://www.gao.gov/special.pubs/eaguide.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>The Federal Enterprise Architecture PMO Action Plan http://www.estrategy.gov/presentations/fea-pmo_slides/index.htm </li></ul><ul><li>E-government strategy http://estrategy.gov/ </li></ul><ul><li>GAO Report to Congressional Committees, February 2002 http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d026.pdf </li></ul>
  34. 34. EA Glossary <ul><li>A-130 Circular A-130, Management of Federal Information Resources. See http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars/a130/a130.html </li></ul><ul><li>ABC Activity-Based Cost management; a system of breaking tasks into work activities to show how money is spent </li></ul><ul><li>Activity model Data model of an activity </li></ul><ul><li>Affinity reports Reports showing where similar systems are; used for consolidating systems </li></ul><ul><li>Artifact Piece of architecture information discovered through data collection </li></ul><ul><li>Attribute A quality of an entity; a piece of an entity’s description </li></ul><ul><li>BPR Business Process Re-engineering; Examining a business process in-depth to find ways to improve the process </li></ul><ul><li>BRM Business Reference Model; FEA model showing business functions in a hierarchical model </li></ul><ul><li>C&A certification and accreditation </li></ul><ul><li>Component A self-contained, re-usable object, in programming or architecture </li></ul><ul><li>CRUD Create/Read/Update/Delete; basic functions of a database </li></ul><ul><li>Data definition The form in which a piece of data is stored and used. For instance, the data entity “name” may be defined as a last name, a first name, and a middle initial </li></ul><ul><li>Data model Picture of relationships between data entities and attributes </li></ul><ul><li>Deployment Architecture Picture of where data/hardware/software is located </li></ul><ul><li>DRM Data Reference Model; FEA Model of the data standards and models used by the services </li></ul><ul><li>Encyclopedia The data repository underlying DEAR; holds all the model’s components (artifacts, domains) </li></ul><ul><li>Entity An object described in a data model </li></ul><ul><li>FEA Federal Enterprise Architecture; federal standards and templates for enterprise architecture. See http:// www.feapmo.gov </li></ul><ul><li>ICOM Inputs, Controls, Outputs, and Mechanisms; parts of an IDEF0 diagram </li></ul>
  35. 35. EA Glossary <ul><li>IDEF0 A type of diagram used in activity modeling; shows the inputs, outputs, controls, and mechanisms </li></ul><ul><li>IDEF3 A type of diagram used in activity modeling; shows sequence and causes </li></ul><ul><li>Investment Architecture Structure of investment information </li></ul><ul><li>IPT Integrated Product Team – brings process, data, applications, and technology skills together </li></ul><ul><li>Matrix A table showing relationships between each item on the horizontal and vertical axis </li></ul><ul><li>Metadata Data about data; for instance, keywords, or other data used to categorize data </li></ul><ul><li>Metamodel Database schema for DEAR data elements; map of DEAR; model of how models will be built </li></ul><ul><li>Modernization blueprint A plan for improving the enterprise architecture </li></ul><ul><li>OO programming Object-Oriented programming; code that defines or uses objects and their descriptions </li></ul><ul><li>PRM Performance Reference Model; FEA model showing strategy/goals/objectives that drive the architecture </li></ul><ul><li>Repository A storage place for data; could be a database or could be much more </li></ul><ul><li>Service component A capability; an independent piece of a business function. Service components are related to data and technology, which are used by the service component </li></ul><ul><li>SRM Service component Reference Model; FEA model showing service components, or capabilities </li></ul><ul><li>Subfunction A piece of a business function; similar level as ABC work activities </li></ul><ul><li>System Architecture Structure of systems and their building blocks </li></ul><ul><li>TRM Technical Reference Model; FEA model of the technology that performs the services, and standards </li></ul>
  36. 36. Document Abstract Revision History S:DearIBAWIPCommunicationsArchitecture Curriculum finals (sent to Colleen)Architecture 100 Made Colleen’s changes from draft Karen Tallentire 11/07/03 WIP Filename/lineage Description of edit Author/Editor Rev. Date Doc Status Key Words: Architecture, curriculum, EA 100 Part of the Architecture Curriculum for the Communications task Contract #: NBD020221 Task Number: 8 M 1230 FEAF Area: Subject Function Code:

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