Cambridge english first information

2,785 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
2,785
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,524
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
51
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cambridge english first information

  1. 1. CAMBRIDGE ENGLISH: FIRST, ALSO KNOWN AS FIRST CERTIFICATE IN ENGLISH (FCE), IS FIRST, (FCE), WHO THEY WRITTEN AN EXAM FOR PEOPLE WHO NEED TO PROVE THEY CAN USE EVERYDAY WRITTEN AND SPOKEN ENGLISH AT AN UPPER-INTERMEDIATE LEVEL FOR WORK OR STUDY PURPOSES. UPPER- FOR POSES. PURPOSES Exam overview Whats in the exam? Marks (% ofPaper Content total) PurposeReading 3 parts/30 Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text,(1 hour) questions 20% such as fiction, newspapers and magazines.Writing Requires you to be able to produce two different pieces of(1 hour 20 minutes) 2 parts 20% writing, such as letters, reports, reviews and short stories.Use of English 4 parts/42 Your use of English will be tested by tasks which show how(45 minutes) questions 20% well you can control your grammar and vocabulary. Requires you to be able to follow and understand a range ofListening 4 parts/30 spoken materials, such as news programmes, presentations(about 40 minutes) questions 20% and everyday conversations.Speaking Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face(14 minutes per situations. You will take the Speaking test with one or twopair of candidates) 4 parts 20% other candidates.
  2. 2. EXAM FORMATREADING ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------SummaryTime allowed: 1 hourNumber of parts: 3Number of questions: 30Marks: 20% of totalLengths of texts: 550–700 words per text: about 2,000 words to read in total newspaper and magazine articles, reports, fiction, advertisements, letters, messages, informational materialTexts may be from: (e.g. brochures, guides, manuals, etc.)Part 1 (Multiple choice) A text with some multiple-choice questions. Each question has four options (A, B, C or D) and you have to decide which is the correct answer.Whats in Part 1? How to understand the details of a text,What do I have to practise? including opinions and attitudes.How many questions are there? 8How many marks do I get? Two marks for each correct answer.
  3. 3. Part 2 (Gapped text) A text with some empty spaces (gaps). After the text there are some sentences taken from the text. You have to choose the correct sentence for each gap.Whats in Part 2? How to understand the structure and followWhat do I have to practise? the development of a text.How many questions are there? 7How many marks do I get? Two marks for each correct answer.Part 3 (Multiple matching) A series of questions and a long text or several short texts to read. For each question, you have to decide which text or part of the text mentions some specific information.Whats in Part 3? How to find specific information in a text orWhat do I have to practise? texts.How many questions are there? 15How many marks do I get? One mark for each correct answer.DOs and DON’TsDOs- Read the sources, titles and subtitles of the texts where given; they are there to help you.
  4. 4. - Read each text carefully before you answer the questions to get an overall impression and understanding of it. This includes Part 3, the multiple matching task.- Remember, the missing word(s) may be forming part of an idiom, fixed phrase or collocation, so always check the words around the gap carefully. (Part 2)- Remember, the missing sentence must fit the context of the passage, so always check that the completed paragraph makes sense in the passage as a whole. (Part 2)- Keep an overall idea of the development of the text. You will need to check that the sentences chosen to fit the gaps in the base text fit the progression of the argument or narrative as a whole. (Part 2)- Read the questions carefully and check each option against the text before rejecting it. (Part 2)DONTs- Dont try to answer any questions without referring carefully to the text.- Dont spend too much time on any one part of the paper.- Dont forget to record your answers on the separate answer sheet.- Dont assume that if the same word appears in the text as well as in an option, this means you have located the answer.WRITING ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- --------------------------------------------------------------------------------SummaryTime allowed: 1 hour 20 minutesNumber of parts: 2 Part 1: one compulsory questionNumber of questions: Part 2: one question from a choice of fiveMarks: 20% of total
  5. 5. Types of task: article, email, essay, letter, report, review, storyPart 1 Some material to read (up to 160 words). You have to write a letter or email using the information in this material.Whats in Part 1? Writing a letter or email. You may have to apologise, compare, describe, explain, express opinions, justify, persuade,What do I have to practise? recommend, and/or suggest something.How many questions are there? One compulsory question.How much do I have to write? 120–150 wordsPart 2 A choice of five questions. The answer you have to write will be one of the following: an article, essay, letter, report, review or story.Whats in Part 2? If you read one of the set books and want to write about it, you may decide to try Question 5. You have a choice of two tasksWhat about Question 5? 5 (a) or 5 (b) for this question. Writing different types of text: articles, essays, letters, reports, reviews. Depending on the question, you will have to advise, compare, describe, explain, express opinions, justify and/or recommendWhat do I have to practise? something.
  6. 6. One task to be selected from a choice of How many questions are there? five. How much do I have to write? 120–180 words DOs and DON’Ts DOs1. Read the whole question thoroughly and underline important parts.2. Make a plan for each answer, including ALL points.3. Expand the points in Part 1 if you can, using relevant ideas and information.4. Write in paragraphs, whenever appropriate.5. Use a range of vocabulary, even if you are unsure of the correct spelling.6. Check tense endings, plural forms and word order in sentences.7. Check irregular past tenses and question formation.8. Check irregular past tenses and question formation.9. Use language that is appropriately formal or informal for the task.10. Choose a Part 2 question that you feel confident you can write about.11. Write clearly, so that the examiner can read your answer. DONTs12. Dont misspell key words which appear on the question paper.13. Dont use the exact words from the question paper too much.14. Dont mix formal and informal language.15. Dont use formal linkers in an informal letter.16. Dont waste time writing addresses for a letter, as they are not required.17. Dont answer Question 5 if you haven’t read one of the books.18. Dont worry if you run slightly over the word limit.
  7. 7. - How many texts do I need to write?Two. You must do the task in Part 1, and you can choose one task from Part 2. what- In what ways is Part 1 different from Part 2?In Part 1 there is one compulsory task, while in Part 2 there is a choice of tasks. In Part 1, before youstart writing you will need to read material of up to 160 words, e.g. advertisements, extracts fromletters, articles, etc., while in Part 2 the instructions are shorter. In Part 1, you always need to write aletter or an email, whereas in Part 2 there is a range of different text types to choose from.- Where do I write my answers?In the question booklet. This booklet also contains enough space for you to write your rough work.USE OF ENGLISH ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------SummaryTime allowed: 45 minutesNumber of parts: 4Number of questions: 42Marks: 20% of total (Multiple-Part 1 (Multiple-choice cloze) A text in which there are some missing words or phrases (gaps). After the text there are four possible answers for eachWhats in Part 1? gap and you have to choose the correct
  8. 8. answer (A, B, C or D). Vocabulary – words with similar meanings, collocations, linking phrases, phrasal verbs,What do I have to practise? etc.How many questions are there? 12How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer.Part 2 (Open cloze) A text in which there are some missing words (gaps). You have to find the correct word for each gap.Whats in Part 2?What do I have to practise? Grammar and vocabulary.How many questions are there? 12How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer.Part 3 (Word formation) A text containing ten gaps. Each gap represents a word. At the end of the line is a ‘prompt’ word which you have to change in some way to make the correct missing word and complete the sentence correctly.Whats in Part 3? Vocabulary – word building: the different words which you can make from a ‘base’What do I have to practise? word, e.g. ‘compete’ becomes ‘competition’,
  9. 9. ‘competitor’, ‘competitive’, competitively’ or ‘uncompetitive’. How many questions are there? 10 How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer. Part 4 (Key word transformations) A sentence followed by a key word and a second sentence which has a gap in it. You have to use the key word to complete the second sentence so that it means the same as the first sentence. Whats in Part 4? Grammar and vocabulary – rewriting sentences with different words so that they What do I have to practise? mean the same thing. How many questions are there? 8 How many marks are there? Up to two marks for each correct answer. DOs and DON’Ts DOs1. Read the words following the gaps in Parts 1 and 2 as they may have an effect on the answer.2. Make sure that any verb you write in a gap in Part 2 agrees with its subject.3. Write the prompt word in your answer in Part 3 without changing it in any way.4. Write between two and five words as your answer in Part 4.5. Remember that the words you need to write in Part 3 might have to change into a negative or a plural.
  10. 10. 6. Check your spelling in all parts of the test7. Make sure that you transfer your answers to the answer sheet accurately. DONTs8. Dont write the answers to any of the examples on your answer sheets.9. Dont choose your answer in Part 1 before you have read all the options.10. Dont write out the full sentence when answering the questions in Part 4.11. Dont leave the base word in Part 3 unchanged.12. Don’t decide on your answer before reading the whole of a sentence in all parts.13. Dont give alternative answers for any questions. - Will I lose marks for incorrect answers? No, you will not have marks deducted if you give an incorrect answer. If you give a wrong answer, it is the same as giving no answer – you get no marks for that question. If you’re not sure about an question answer, it is better to guess than to leave the question blank - How do I record my answers? Write your answers on the answer sheets provided by filling in a box or by writing words (between two and five words allowed for answers in Part 4). Your answer sheet will be scanned onto a computer – make sure you fill in the answers clearly. You must transfer your answers within the time given for the paper (45 minutes). How important is spelling in the Use of English paper? All spelling must be correct in this paper. You will not get a mark for answers which are not spelled correctly. - If I think there are two possible answers to one question, can I write them both? If you write two or more answers and one of these is incorrect, you get no mark. You should write only one answer for each question. - In the Use of English test, are words like doesnt and isnt counted as one or two words? To count the number of words, the full form should be taken into account, e.g. didnt = did not = two words.
  11. 11. LISTENING -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------SummaryTime allowed: about 40 minutesNumber of parts: 4Number of questions: 30Marks: 20% of totalPart 1 (Multiple choice) A series of short, unrelated recordings of approximately 30 seconds each. You have to listen to the recordings and answer one multiple-choice question for each. Each question has three options (A, B or C).Whats in Part 1? Listening for general meaning (gist), detail, function, purpose, attitude, opinion, relationship, topic, place, situation, genre,What do I have to practise? agreement, etc.How many questions are there? 8How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer.Part 2 (Sentence completion) A monologue (one person speaking), or a
  12. 12. Whats in Part 2? recording with two or more speakers lasting approximately 3 minutes. To answer the questions, you have to complete the sentences on the question paper with information you hear on the recording. Listening for detail, specific information,What do I have to practise? stated opinion.How many questions are there? 10How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer.Part 3 (Multiple matching) A series of statements and short related monologues of approximately 30 seconds each. You listen to the recordings and choose which statement best matches what each speaker says.Whats in Part 3? Listening for general gist, detail, function, purpose, attitude, opinion, relationship, topic, place, situation, genre, agreement,What do I have to practise? etc.How many questions are there? 5How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer.Part 4 (Multiple choice) A monologue or recording with two or moreWhats in Part 4? speakers which lasts approximately 3
  13. 13. minutes. You have to listen to the recording and answer seven multiple-choice questions. Each question has three options (A, B or C). Listening for opinion, attitude, gist, main What do I have to practise? idea, specific information. How many questions are there? 7 How many marks are there? One mark for each correct answer. DOs and DON’Ts DOs1. Listen to and read the instructions throughout the test. Make sure you understand what you are listening for and what you have to do.2. Use the preparation time before each recording is played to read through the question and think about the context.3. Use the information on the page to help you follow the text.4. Look carefully at what is printed before and after the gap in Part 2 and think about the kind of information that you are listening for.5. Write only the missing information on the answer sheet. (Part 2)6. Write your answers as clearly as possible.7. If you have an idea of the correct answer the first time you hear a recording, check that this is correct the second time.8. Answer all the questions – even if youre not sure.9. Make sure you have transferred your answers accurately to the answer sheet.
  14. 14. DONTs10. Dont rephrase what you hear in Part 2; write down the exact word(s) or figure(s) that you hear on the recording.11. Dont complicate your answer by writing extra, irrelevant information. (Part 2)12. Dont spend too much time on a question you are having difficulty with as you may miss the next question.13. Dont rush to choose an answer just because you hear one word or phrase – concentrate on the overall meaning. (Parts 1, 3 and 4) - What aspects of listening are tested in the Cambridge English: First Listening test? You will be tested on your understanding of gist, main points, detail and specific information, and your ability to deduce meaning. You will listen to monologues and interacting speakers from a variety of sources. - How many times will I hear each recording? You will hear each recording twice. - How do I record my answers? You must write all your answers on a separate answer sheet. You may write on the question paper as you listen, but you must transfer your answers to the answer sheet. You will have 5 minutes at the end of the test to do this. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ SPEAKING -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Summary Time allowed: 14 minutes per pair of candidates Number of parts: 4 Marks: 20% of total
  15. 15. with the examiner with the other candidateYou have to talk: on your ownPart 1 (Interview) Conversation with the examiner. The examiner asks questions and you may have to give information about yourself, talk about past experiences, present circumstances and future plans.Whats in Part 1? Giving information about yourself and expressing your opinion about variousWhat do I have to practise? topics.How long do I have to speak? 3 minutesPart 2 (Long turn) The examiner gives you a pair of photographs to talk about and you have to speak for 1 minute without interruption. The questions you have to answer about your photographs are written at the top of the page to remind you what you should talk about. When you have finished speaking, your partner then has to answer a short question from the examiner about your photographs.Whats in Part 2? Talking on your own about something:What do I have to practise? comparing, describing, expressing opinions.
  16. 16. How long do I have to speak? 1 minute per candidate Part 3 (Collaborative task) Conversation with the other candidate. The examiner gives you some pictures and a decision-making task to do. You have to talk with the other candidate and make a decision. Whats in Part 3? Exchanging ideas, expressing and justifying opinions, agreeing and/or disagreeing, suggesting, speculating, evaluating, reaching a decision through negotiation, What do I have to practise? etc. How long do we have to speak? 3 minutes Part 4 (Discussion) Further discussion with the other candidate about the same topic as the task in Part 3. Whats in Part 4? Expressing and justifying opinions, What do I have to practise? agreeing and/or disagreeing. How long do I have to speak? 4 minutes DOs and DON’Ts DOs1. Make sure you are familiar with what happens, and what skills you need to show, in
  17. 17. each part of the test.2. Practise speaking English as much as possible in groups and in pairs, both inside and outside the classroom.3. Listen carefully to the instructions and questions during the test and respond appropriately.4. Speak clearly, so that both the interlocutor and assessor can hear you.5. Use all the opportunities youre given in the test to speak, and extend your responses whenever possible.6. Ask for clarification of instructions or a question if youre not sure.7. Be prepared to initiate discussion as well as responding to what your partner says.8. Make full use of the time so that the examiner who is listening hears plenty of your English. DONTs9. Dont prepare long answers in advance, or learn and practise speeches.10. Dont try to dominate your partner or interrupt them abruptly during the Speaking test.11. Dont leave long or frequent pauses.12. Dont worry about being interrupted by the examiner. This shows you have spoken enough. The tests have to keep to the time limit for administrative reasons. - Do we speak to each other as well as to the examiner? Yes. In Parts 1 and 2, you speak to the interlocutor (the examiner who speaks to you) but in Part 3, you must discuss something with the other candidate. In this part, you must speak to each other and NOT to the interlocutor. In Part 4 you can speak to the interlocutor or to your partner, or to both. - What should I do if I dont understand the instructions? You should ask the examiner to repeat the instructions.

×