National Focus Area ATTCsMeeting with SAMHSA’s RAs         Suzan Swanton, LCSW          Public Health Advisor Center for S...
Purpose of ATTCs“The purpose of this program (ATTCs) is to  develop and strengthen the workforce that  provides addictions...
SAMHSA’s Perspective   Creation of the National Focus Area ATTCs    increases the level of focus to specific areas    rel...
SAMHSA’s CommitmentNational Focus Areas ATTCs reflect    SAMHSA’s commitment to                     reduce                ...
Challenges Ensuring the timely and meaningful communication of information between ATTCs and Regional Administrators Ens...
Solutions   ATTC Regional Center Directors will    be the primary contacts for the    Regional Administrators for any    ...
Solutions   A web-based conference call held    in Spring 2013 to present the work    plan and level of expertise of each...
Solutions   A special section of the ATTC Network’s    monthly electronic publication, the    Addiction Messenger, will b...
National Focus Area ATTCsNational American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC  •   University of IowaNational Frontier and Rura...
Population We Serve• Population: 5,220,579 million people• Recognized tribes by the federal government, by  state governme...
Specific Issues• Health disparity:   – Physical      • Disproportionally high prevalence of chronic conditions, such as   ...
The 12 IHS Regions
IHS Regions & the HHS Regions                       Region 1            Region 7                       – Nashville        ...
MissionServe as the national subject expert and key resource on adoption of    culturally legitimate addiction  treatment/...
Our Goals• Advance the AI/AN SUD treatment field by enhancing  communications and collaborations with stakeholders  and or...
Our Goals• Enhance the AI/AN workforce through a  workforce development initiative.• Offer TA and training to AI/AN organi...
Target population• Behavioral Health workforce providing training  for American Indian and Alaska Native clients    – Reco...
Methods• Training and technical assistance• Capacity building• Training of trainers  – Develop trainers in Indian Health S...
Advisory Council                                                            Lorrie Miner, JDDan Dickerson, DO, MPH,       ...
Advisory Council                                                                               Representative from the    ...
Ex-Officio MembersJuanita M. Mendoza  – Bureau of Indian Education  – Washington D.C.Invited Ex-Officio Organizations  –  ...
Staff and Major Consultants Anne Helene Skinstad, Ph.D Program Director                     Karen Summers, MPH, CHES      ...
Staff and Major Consultants Erin Thin Elk, MSW Sicangu Lakota Oyate Senior Behavioral Health Consultant                   ...
Consultants•   Harlan Pruden, BA          •   Janet Zwick, BA•   Richard Moreno, MEd        •   Andrew Finch, Ph.D.•   Spe...
Collaborators• Federal partners• ATTC regional offices and HHS Regional  Directors• ATTC Focus area ATTC
First Year Milestones• Strategic planning   – Strategic Planning Meeting held in January   – Strategic plan anticipated in...
First Year Milestones• Media  – Newsletter: First edition in mid April• Develop relationships with American Indian  and Al...
Training Programs Offered This Year• Alcohol and Drug Exam Review   – Developed in 1999 as the Certification Prep Training...
Other Projects Initiated• Recovery Oriented Systems of Care   – Focus groups• Motivational Interviewing   – The Spirit of ...
Other Continued Prairielands ATTC Native American                      Programs• Training in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disord...
Thank youContact us:•Anne Helene Skinstad: Anne-skinstad@uiowa.edu•Karen Summers; karen-summers@uiowa.edu•Jacki Bock: jack...
Over half of country’s land mass is designated as frontier or rural                                 (USDA, 2000)
Approximately one quarter of U.S.     population (62 million) lives in          frontier/rural areaswith 16-20% of those i...
Individuals residing rural and remote areas have  higher mortality rates, suicide rates, and their        alcohol/drug pro...
A 2009 workforce study reported that the lowest concentration of mental healthprofessionals was found in frontier/ruralare...
DefinitionsTelehealth‘the use of telecommunications and information   technologies to provide access to health information...
TelemedicineAnnually, 10 million patients receive telemedicine services
VA Services   146 hospitals provided 55,000 patients in    community-based outpatient clinics with    140,000 telemental ...
Addiction Treatment Lags Behind
23.2 Million People Meet the Criteria for SUDs                                   (NSDUH; SAMHSA, 2007)
Telehealth Technologies Help Address       Barriers to Treatment
Barriers Include Privacy and Confidentiality                          (Moyer & Finney, 2004/2005) Travel Costs and Burde...
Telehealth is not about the technology but serves asa bridge reaching out to clients so services thatsupport behavior chan...
Whether its Group Counseling                       or Like ThisLike This
or Client HomeworkLike This                             Or Like This
Can a meaningful clinical relationship bedeveloped if a client and counselor do not     share the same physical space?    ...
Telehealth is in the Best Interest         of the ClientsExpanding Access                        Enhancing                ...
Literature ReviewAddiction Treatment Using Telehealth TechnologiesComputer-based InterventionsWeb-ScreenersWeb-based Su...
Serve as the national subject areaexpert and key resource to PROMOTEthe awareness and implementation of       telehealth t...
Create addiction treatmenttelehealth competencies and developpolicy recommendations for national license portability to en...
Use state-of-the-art    culturally-relevant training and technical assistance activities to helpthe frontier/rural addicti...
PREPARE pre-service addictiontreatment and allied health students on using telehealth technologies by DEVELOPING and DISSE...
Advisory Board                           Work Group Members   NASADAD- Executive Director   SAAS- Executive Director   ...
Year 1 Key Events   Build compendium through Literature Searches   Develop Graphics/Marketing Themes   Conduct Teleheal...
TARGET POPULATIONAddiction Treatment Providers & Counselors
Upcoming TrainingsBrief Introductory Training - Counselors         Administrators Training
Curricula   Brief Introductory Workshop for Counselors       Types of telehealth used and treatment outcomes       Ethi...
Where in the World is NFAR?Behavioral Health is Essential to Health   Prevention Works | Treatment is Effective | People R...
Years 2-5   Film and Disseminate Two Telehealth Workshops   Develop Clinical Supervisor Curriculum   Annotate Bibliogra...
Terra             Annie                 Hamblin           Vicente                                                         ...
Mike WilhelmJohn Dell
Thank youhttp://www.attcnetwork.org/frontierrural
Behavioral Health is Essential to Health   Prevention Works | Treatment is Effective | People Recover
Definition of Hispanic and Latino        According to the US Census Bureau,   “Hispanic or Latino” refers to a person of C...
Justification•   Largest minority•   Growing population•   New destinations•   Health insurance coverage•   Substance abus...
Largest Minority• 52 million Hispanic and Latinos• 16.7% of the total US populationReference: US Census Bureau (2012, Augu...
Growing PopulationSource: Starks, B. (2012, March 14). Data for the day: Growth in Hispanic populations 2000-2010. Retriev...
Traditional vs. Non Traditional                            Destinations  •    South Carolina                              ...
Health Insurance       Almost 1 in 3 (30.7%) individuals uninsured in               the U.S. is Hispanic or Latino.Referen...
Hispanic and Latinos: Health Care Reform                                                  • Expected to provide           ...
Hispanic and Latinos:                 Drug Use and Treatment Admission        • 8.4% of Hispanics (12yrs or older) reporte...
Workforce and Disparities• Hispanic and Latinos are underrepresented in  professions related to behavioral health.• Lack o...
MissionDevelop and strengthen the workforce providingsubstance abuse treatment and recovery supportservices for Hispanic a...
VisionServe as the national subject matter expert andkey resource for the workforce that providesinstruction to and substa...
Primary Focus Population• Trainers offering instruction to the workforce servicing  the Hispanic and Latino population• Wo...
Project Goals1. Identify resources available and needs regarding   training and capacity of culturally appropriate service...
Critical Element to Reach Center’s                   Purpose•   Training need assessments•   Capacity assessments•   Strat...
Partnerships and Collaborations• Three key groups  – ATTC Regional Centers  – Advisory Board  – Panel of Experts
Partnerships                       Strategies                  Competencies           ATTC Regional Centers             Pr...
Advisory BoardHenry Acosta, MA, MSW, LSW   Dona M. Dmitrovic, MHS          Marco E. Jacome,           Alex Kopelowicz, MD ...
Panel of ExpertsExperts on the field            Up-to-date resources                           Relevant resources         ...
StaffIbis Carrión, PsyDDirector        Miguel Cruz, MS       Associate DirectorDigmarie A. Alicea-Santana, PhDProduct Plan...
StaffDarice Orobitg, PhDTraining and TA Planning andDevelopment Coordinator            Víctor Flores, MC      Training and...
StaffJesús D. Díaz-Peña, MEdInstructional Designer &Technology Specialist       Maribel González, BA         Research Assi...
National Hispanic and Latino ATTC     Universidad Central del CaribeP.O. Box 60327 Bayamón, PR 00960-6032              787...
Substance Use IsA Public Health Problem
Learning from Public HealthThe public health system of care routinely screens  for potential medical problems (cancer, dia...
“SBIRT has been defined by SAMHSA as a  comprehensive, integrated, public health  approach to the delivery of early  inter...
National SBIRT ATTC Goals– Goal 1. Serve as the national subject matter expert  and key resource for SBIRT;– Goal 2. Broad...
Team and Collaborators• ATTC regional centers, network office, and other NFAs• Brief Intervention Group (BIG) initiatives ...
Advisory BoardDeborah S. Finnell, DNS, PHMHP-BC, CARN-AP, FAAN - Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Thomas E. Free...
Staff             Peter F. Luongo, PhD -        Holly Hagle, PhD –          Dawn Lindsay, PhD –             Principal Inve...
Year 1 Key events and Upcoming Key events
We can’t do something for everyone…              but we can have something for everyone.•   Work plan•   Suite of services...
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers
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About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers

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The National Focus Area ATTCs
work with ATTC Regional Centers to
serve as subject matter experts, provide information on the latest research-based best practices, and coordinate efforts on four topics of national focus. Learn more about these four Centers and their areas of expertise.

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  • One consistent finding from the literature is that the diffusion of an innovations is a slow process with variable success. Balas and Boren (2000) reported that the translation of medical research findings into regular clinical practice took an average of 17 years….. While Ryan and Gross (1943) in the hybrid corn adoption example found that it took farmers 13 years to adopt the hybrid corn seed and another 7 years to use it exclusively (change the practice). This long lag in adoption of innovation appears to be consistent across field including communications, marketing and management, sociology, medicine, and public health (2003).
  • 23 million people Not serving the people we need to serve TH can expand and enhance access and services Science behind it… what we know TH adoption/implementation will have a huge impact on our workforce Ethics/scope of practice (just because you can do something doesn’t mean you should Technology – accessibility – using it without consideration of privacy/security Reimbursement This is not going away so what is the best way to deal with it – adapt – timely
  • About the ATTC Network National Focus Area Centers

    1. 1. National Focus Area ATTCsMeeting with SAMHSA’s RAs Suzan Swanton, LCSW Public Health Advisor Center for Substance Abuse Treatment SAMHSA
    2. 2. Purpose of ATTCs“The purpose of this program (ATTCs) is to develop and strengthen the workforce that provides addictions treatment and recovery support services to those in need.”(ATTC RFA, 2012)
    3. 3. SAMHSA’s Perspective Creation of the National Focus Area ATTCs increases the level of focus to specific areas related to the Strategic Initiatives As stated in the RFA…“The National Focus Area ATTCs will focus their activities primarily on nation-wide initiatives involving the entire ATTC Network.”
    4. 4. SAMHSA’s CommitmentNational Focus Areas ATTCs reflect SAMHSA’s commitment to reduce health disparities(ATTC RFA, 2012)
    5. 5. Challenges Ensuring the timely and meaningful communication of information between ATTCs and Regional Administrators Ensuring National Focus Area ATTCs are responsive to Regional Administrators requests
    6. 6. Solutions ATTC Regional Center Directors will be the primary contacts for the Regional Administrators for any item or request relating to the work of any ATTC.
    7. 7. Solutions A web-based conference call held in Spring 2013 to present the work plan and level of expertise of each of the National Focus Area ATTCs to Regional Administrators
    8. 8. Solutions A special section of the ATTC Network’s monthly electronic publication, the Addiction Messenger, will be dedicated to highlighting the current activities of the National Focus Area ATTCs. (February 2013)
    9. 9. National Focus Area ATTCsNational American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC • University of IowaNational Frontier and Rural ATTC • University of Nevada, RenoNational Hispanic-Latino ATTC • Universidad Central del Caribe Puerto RicoNational Screening and Brief Intervention ATTC • Institute for Research Education and Training in Addictions (IRETA) Pittsburg, PA
    10. 10. Population We Serve• Population: 5,220,579 million people• Recognized tribes by the federal government, by state government, and unrecognized tribes trying to receive recognition status – 566 federally recognized tribes – 206 SUD treatment programs operated by tribal communities and Indian Health Service – 38 Urban Indian programs across the country – 70% of people with SUD are treated in Urban Indian facilities• Many American Indian and Alaska Native are moving between urban areas and their tribal communities
    11. 11. Specific Issues• Health disparity: – Physical • Disproportionally high prevalence of chronic conditions, such as cardio-vascular disease, diabetes, STIs, hepatitis: – Mental health disparity: • Depression, PTSD • Historical trauma• Economic disadvantage – 27% of the population live in poverty (11.5% in the general US population) – Over 1/3 have no medical coverage
    12. 12. The 12 IHS Regions
    13. 13. IHS Regions & the HHS Regions Region 1 Region 7 – Nashville – Aberdeen – Nashville Region 2 – Oklahoma City – Nashville Region 8 Region 3 – Aberdeen – Nashville – Albuquerque Region 4 – – Billings Navajo – Nashville – Phoenix Region 5 Region 9 – Bemidji – California – Nashville – Navajo Region 6 – Phoenix – Albuquerque – Tucson – – Nashville Region 10 Navajo – Alaska – Oklahoma City – Portland
    14. 14. MissionServe as the national subject expert and key resource on adoption of culturally legitimate addiction treatment/ recovery services tosupport professionals working with AI/AN clients with substance use and other behavioral healthdisorders and the AI/AN behavioral health workforce.
    15. 15. Our Goals• Advance the AI/AN SUD treatment field by enhancing communications and collaborations with stakeholders and organizations.• Conduct ongoing assessment of needs and workforce development issues.• Facilitate and promote the use of culturally legitimate EBPs.• Use state of the art technology transfer principles in our educational events.
    16. 16. Our Goals• Enhance the AI/AN workforce through a workforce development initiative.• Offer TA and training to AI/AN organizations on integrating behavioral health into primary care, based on SAMHSA and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Center for Integrated Health Solutions (2012).• Facilitate the development of ROSC in AI/AN communities.
    17. 17. Target population• Behavioral Health workforce providing training for American Indian and Alaska Native clients – Recovery support specialists• Trainers• Educators• Clinical supervisors• Future leaders in behavioral health organizations
    18. 18. Methods• Training and technical assistance• Capacity building• Training of trainers – Develop trainers in Indian Health Service regions• Learning collaboratives• Mentoring networks
    19. 19. Advisory Council Lorrie Miner, JDDan Dickerson, DO, MPH, Acting Chief Judge, Lower BruleInupiaq Sioux Tribal CourtAssociate Research Psychiatrist, UCLAIntegrated Substance Abuse Programs Wayne H. White Wolf-Evans, E.Ed. Teton Sicangu Lakota Professor Emeritus, USD School of EducationDennis Norman, S. EdD, ABPPCheyenne & CherokeeAssociate Professor & FacultyChair, Harvard University Dolores Subia BigFoot, PhD Caddo Nation Director, Indian Country Child Trauma Center, University of Oklahoma
    20. 20. Advisory Council Representative from the Sac & Fox Tribe of Mississippi in Iowa Clyde McCoy, PhD MADAC, Meskwaki Health Clinic Professor of Epidemiology University of Miami School of Medicine Ralph Forquera, MPH Executive Director, Seattle Indian Health Board Director, Urban Indian Health Institute Associate Clinical Professor University of WashingtonRichard Bird, MMS, CCDCIIISisseton-Wahpeton Oyate Ray Daw, MADirector, Dakota Pride Treatment Behavioral Health Administrator, Yukon-Kuskokwim-Center, South Dakota Health Cooperation
    21. 21. Ex-Officio MembersJuanita M. Mendoza – Bureau of Indian Education – Washington D.C.Invited Ex-Officio Organizations – National Indian Health Board – National Council on Urban Indian Health – Indian Health Service – Bureau of Indian Affairs
    22. 22. Staff and Major Consultants Anne Helene Skinstad, Ph.D Program Director Karen Summers, MPH, CHES Evaluations & Curriculum Development Jacki Bock Faculty Consultants Fiscal & Contract Vanessa Simonds, Sc.D Peter E. Nathan, PhD Graduate Research Assistants Rachel Cahoon, MPH student Kari Folkedahl, MSW student
    23. 23. Staff and Major Consultants Erin Thin Elk, MSW Sicangu Lakota Oyate Senior Behavioral Health Consultant Dale Walker, MD Member of the Cherokee Nation Consultant, One Sky Center Donovan Sprague, MA Member of the Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe Cultural Consultant Kate Winters, MA Project Consultant
    24. 24. Consultants• Harlan Pruden, BA • Janet Zwick, BA• Richard Moreno, MEd • Andrew Finch, Ph.D.• Spero Manson, Ph.D.• • Pam Waters, MA Jacque Gray, Ph.D.• Gary Neumann • Paula Horvatich, Ph.D• Debra Painte, MPA • Rosemary Whiteshield, PhD• Ed Parsells, BS, CCDCIII• Ken Winters, Ph.D.• Representatives from the National Native American AIDS Prevention Center
    25. 25. Collaborators• Federal partners• ATTC regional offices and HHS Regional Directors• ATTC Focus area ATTC
    26. 26. First Year Milestones• Strategic planning – Strategic Planning Meeting held in January – Strategic plan anticipated in May• Initiate two webinar series – Essential Substance Abuse Skills – Behavioral Health Webinar• Develop trainers – Offer TOTs for specific training programs• Develop workgroups on – Leadership development – Recovery oriented care – Evidence based treatment
    27. 27. First Year Milestones• Media – Newsletter: First edition in mid April• Develop relationships with American Indian and Alaska Native providers – Visit Indian Health Service regions – Assess needs for training and TA• Continue already initiated training and technical assistance initiatives
    28. 28. Training Programs Offered This Year• Alcohol and Drug Exam Review – Developed in 1999 as the Certification Prep Training Programs for Native American Counselors – Preparation for Certification or Licensure Exams• Native American Curriculum for State Accredited, Non-Tribal Substance Abuse Programs – Adapted to tribal communities in Minnesota. – Hoped to extend the adaptations to other tribal communities outside of the Aberdeen Area• Two Spirit Initiative
    29. 29. Other Projects Initiated• Recovery Oriented Systems of Care – Focus groups• Motivational Interviewing – The Spirit of Communication: MI and Native American Teaching Curriculum• Clinical Supervision – Adapted clinical supervision models to tribal communities - Addendum to TAP 21-A: Competencies for Substance Abuse Treatment Clinical Supervisors• Recruitment, Retention, and Leadership Development – Finding Purpose: Recruiting Native Americans into Behavioral Health recruitment video
    30. 30. Other Continued Prairielands ATTC Native American Programs• Training in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD) – Adapted a FASD training program developed by Mountain West ATTC – Offered training in FASD prevention and treatment at conferences across the Upper Midwest region.• Healthy Women: Healthy Lives – Culturally adapted to Sioux Tribal Communities – In collaboration with the great Plains’ Tribal Chairmen’s Health Board• Online Courses – Substance Use Disorders in Minority MSM – Medication-Assisted Treatment with Special Populations – Essential Substance Abuse Skills: Foundations
    31. 31. Thank youContact us:•Anne Helene Skinstad: Anne-skinstad@uiowa.edu•Karen Summers; karen-summers@uiowa.edu•Jacki Bock: jacki-bock@uiowa.edu National American Indian and Alaska Native ATTC 200 Newton Road, 1207 Westlawn Department of Community and Behavioral Health, University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242 319-335-5564
    32. 32. Over half of country’s land mass is designated as frontier or rural (USDA, 2000)
    33. 33. Approximately one quarter of U.S. population (62 million) lives in frontier/rural areaswith 16-20% of those individuals experiencing substance dependence, mental illness, or co-morbid conditions
    34. 34. Individuals residing rural and remote areas have higher mortality rates, suicide rates, and their alcohol/drug problems are more severe
    35. 35. A 2009 workforce study reported that the lowest concentration of mental healthprofessionals was found in frontier/ruralareas (counties with less than 10,000 people)
    36. 36. DefinitionsTelehealth‘the use of telecommunications and information technologies to provide access to health information and services across a geographical distance’Telemedicine‘use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve patient health status’ (Institute of Medicine , 2012)
    37. 37. TelemedicineAnnually, 10 million patients receive telemedicine services
    38. 38. VA Services 146 hospitals provided 55,000 patients in community-based outpatient clinics with 140,000 telemental health visits Home-based telemental health services were provided to 6,700 patients 2006-2010 hospitalization decreased by 25% for those that participated in telemental health services (IOM, 2012)
    39. 39. Addiction Treatment Lags Behind
    40. 40. 23.2 Million People Meet the Criteria for SUDs (NSDUH; SAMHSA, 2007)
    41. 41. Telehealth Technologies Help Address Barriers to Treatment
    42. 42. Barriers Include Privacy and Confidentiality (Moyer & Finney, 2004/2005) Travel Costs and Burden (Rheuban, 2012) Time Away From Work (Berwick, 2008) Child Care (Berwick, 2008)
    43. 43. Telehealth is not about the technology but serves asa bridge reaching out to clients so services thatsupport behavior change are available. (Shore, 2012)
    44. 44. Whether its Group Counseling or Like ThisLike This
    45. 45. or Client HomeworkLike This Or Like This
    46. 46. Can a meaningful clinical relationship bedeveloped if a client and counselor do not share the same physical space? (Chester & Glass, 2006)
    47. 47. Telehealth is in the Best Interest of the ClientsExpanding Access Enhancing Treatment Services
    48. 48. Literature ReviewAddiction Treatment Using Telehealth TechnologiesComputer-based InterventionsWeb-ScreenersWeb-based Support GroupsTelephone  Continuing Care  Interactive Voice ResponseSmart Phones Web-Portals  Video  Messaging (text and email)
    49. 49. Serve as the national subject areaexpert and key resource to PROMOTEthe awareness and implementation of telehealth technologies
    50. 50. Create addiction treatmenttelehealth competencies and developpolicy recommendations for national license portability to encourage the addiction treatment and recovery workforce to ADOPT the use of telehealth services
    51. 51. Use state-of-the-art culturally-relevant training and technical assistance activities to helpthe frontier/rural addiction treatment and recovery workforce IMPLEMENT telehealth services
    52. 52. PREPARE pre-service addictiontreatment and allied health students on using telehealth technologies by DEVELOPING and DISSEMINATING academic curricula for infusion into existing courses
    53. 53. Advisory Board Work Group Members NASADAD- Executive Director SAAS- Executive Director NAADAC- Executive Director IC&RC-Executive Director HRSA’s Telehealth Resource Centers ATTCs Telehealth Experts Frontier/Rural Addiction Treatment Providers Researchers National Focus Area ATTC
    54. 54. Year 1 Key Events Build compendium through Literature Searches Develop Graphics/Marketing Themes Conduct Telehealth Needs Assessments Develop Curricula Present at National Conferences Present at Regional Summer Institutes Sponsor two TOTs Conduct State Presentations - 2 x each ATTC Region Sponsor Early Adopters Summit
    55. 55. TARGET POPULATIONAddiction Treatment Providers & Counselors
    56. 56. Upcoming TrainingsBrief Introductory Training - Counselors Administrators Training
    57. 57. Curricula Brief Introductory Workshop for Counselors  Types of telehealth used and treatment outcomes  Ethics  Scope of Practice Issues  Competency  Privacy/Security and Confidentiality Issues Administrators’ Workshop  Types of telehealth used and treatment outcomes  Reimbursement and Billing Issues  Telehealth Policies  Privacy/Security and Confidentiality Issues  Decision Matrix
    58. 58. Where in the World is NFAR?Behavioral Health is Essential to Health Prevention Works | Treatment is Effective | People Recover
    59. 59. Years 2-5 Film and Disseminate Two Telehealth Workshops Develop Clinical Supervisor Curriculum Annotate Bibliographies Create Marketing Videos Host Webinars of Curricula Build Addiction Educators Curriculum and Sponsor Training Sponsor Telehealth Competencies Workgroup and Develop a Product Create and Implement Peer Recovery Curriculum Develop Addiction Treatment Curricula
    60. 60. Terra Annie Hamblin Vicente MichelleNancy Joyce Wendy Padden TrishaRoget Hartje Woods Dudkowski
    61. 61. Mike WilhelmJohn Dell
    62. 62. Thank youhttp://www.attcnetwork.org/frontierrural
    63. 63. Behavioral Health is Essential to Health Prevention Works | Treatment is Effective | People Recover
    64. 64. Definition of Hispanic and Latino According to the US Census Bureau, “Hispanic or Latino” refers to a person of Cuban, Mexican, Puerto Rican, South or Central American, or other Spanish culture or origin regardless of race.Reference: Ennis, S. R., Ríos-Vargas, M., & Albert, N. G. (2011, May). The Hispanic population: 2010. Retrieved fromhttp://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf
    65. 65. Justification• Largest minority• Growing population• New destinations• Health insurance coverage• Substance abuse and treatment episodes• Culturally competent workforce
    66. 66. Largest Minority• 52 million Hispanic and Latinos• 16.7% of the total US populationReference: US Census Bureau (2012, August). Hispanic Heritage Month 2012. Retrieved fromhttp://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/facts_for_features_special_editions/cb12-ff19.html
    67. 67. Growing PopulationSource: Starks, B. (2012, March 14). Data for the day: Growth in Hispanic populations 2000-2010. Retrieved from University of NotreDame: http://blogs.nd.edu/thecc/2012/03/14/data-for-the-day/
    68. 68. Traditional vs. Non Traditional Destinations • South Carolina • New York • Alabama • California • Tennessee • Texas • Kentucky • Illinois • Arkansas • Arizona • North Carolina • FloridaReference: Ennis, S. R., Ríos-Vargas, M., & Albert, N. G. (2011, May). The Hispanic population: 2010. Retrieved fromhttp://www.census.gov/prod/cen2010/briefs/c2010br-04.pdf
    69. 69. Health Insurance Almost 1 in 3 (30.7%) individuals uninsured in the U.S. is Hispanic or Latino.Reference: US Census Bureau (2010). Income, poverty and health insurance coverage in the United States: 2010.Retrieved from: http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/income_wealth/cb11-157.html
    70. 70. Hispanic and Latinos: Health Care Reform • Expected to provide increased coverage of health insurance to almost 6 million Hispanics and Latinos. • Hispanics and Latinos are expected to experience the largest increase in insurance coverage.Reference: Henderson, A, Robinson, W, & Finegold, K. (2012). The Affordable Care Act and Latinos. Retrieved from:http://aspe.hhs.gov/health/reports/2012/ACA&Latinos/rb.pdf
    71. 71. Hispanic and Latinos: Drug Use and Treatment Admission • 8.4% of Hispanics (12yrs or older) reported current illicit drug use. • Treatment admissions for Hispanic and Latinos have increased from 10.7% to 14.0% since 1992 to 2010.ReferencesSubstance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA]. (2012). Results from the 2011 National Survey onDrug Use and Health: Summary of national findings. Rockville, MD: Author.Substance Abuse and Mental Health Data Archive [SAMHDA]. (2013). Treatment Episode Data Set - Admissions (TEDS-A),Concatenated, 1992 to 2010. Retrieved from http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/icpsrweb/SAMHDA/sdatools/resources
    72. 72. Workforce and Disparities• Hispanic and Latinos are underrepresented in professions related to behavioral health.• Lack of a bilingual/bicultural behavioral health workforce.• Few service models developed for the Hispanic and Latino population.
    73. 73. MissionDevelop and strengthen the workforce providingsubstance abuse treatment and recovery supportservices for Hispanic and Latino populationsacross United States.
    74. 74. VisionServe as the national subject matter expert andkey resource for the workforce that providesinstruction to and substance abuse treatment andrecovery support services for reducing healthdisparities among Hispanic and Latino populations.
    75. 75. Primary Focus Population• Trainers offering instruction to the workforce servicing the Hispanic and Latino population• Workforce providing addictions treatment and recovery support services to Hispanic and Latino populations.
    76. 76. Project Goals1. Identify resources available and needs regarding training and capacity of culturally appropriate services.2. Ensure Hispanic and Latino populations are seen as key and given priority among stakeholders.3. Broaden the ATTCs scope on implementation practices and system transformation.4. To develop and strengthen the skills and capabilities of the workforce.5. To build a collaborative and communication relationship with other training, TA centers, and technology transfer providers.
    77. 77. Critical Element to Reach Center’s Purpose• Training need assessments• Capacity assessments• Strategic plan• Learning community• Suite of services• Exhibitors• Marketing
    78. 78. Partnerships and Collaborations• Three key groups – ATTC Regional Centers – Advisory Board – Panel of Experts
    79. 79. Partnerships Strategies Competencies ATTC Regional Centers Project Task ForceNon duplication Strengthen Delivery
    80. 80. Advisory BoardHenry Acosta, MA, MSW, LSW Dona M. Dmitrovic, MHS Marco E. Jacome, Alex Kopelowicz, MD Faces and Voices of MA, LPC, CSADC, CEAP Latino Behavioral Health Acosta Consulting Recovery Healthcare Alternative Institute Systems Cynthia Moreno-Tuohy, Mary Jo Mather José Szapocznik, PhD NCAII, CCDCII Executive Director NAADAC University of Miami IC&RC Miller School Medicine
    81. 81. Panel of ExpertsExperts on the field Up-to-date resources Relevant resources and information SAMHSA Strategic Initiatives
    82. 82. StaffIbis Carrión, PsyDDirector Miguel Cruz, MS Associate DirectorDigmarie A. Alicea-Santana, PhDProduct Planning and DevelopmentCoordinator
    83. 83. StaffDarice Orobitg, PhDTraining and TA Planning andDevelopment Coordinator Víctor Flores, MC Training and TA Planning and Development ConsultantCarmen Andújar, BALogistic Specialist
    84. 84. StaffJesús D. Díaz-Peña, MEdInstructional Designer &Technology Specialist Maribel González, BA Research AssistantJoaquina Escudero-TexidorFiscal Administrator
    85. 85. National Hispanic and Latino ATTC Universidad Central del CaribeP.O. Box 60327 Bayamón, PR 00960-6032 787-785-5220 hispanic@attcnetwork.org
    86. 86. Substance Use IsA Public Health Problem
    87. 87. Learning from Public HealthThe public health system of care routinely screens for potential medical problems (cancer, diabetes, hypertension, tuberculosis, vitamin deficiencies, renal function), provides preventative services prior to the onset of acute symptoms, and delays or precludes the development of chronic conditions.
    88. 88. “SBIRT has been defined by SAMHSA as a comprehensive, integrated, public health approach to the delivery of early intervention for individuals with risky alcohol and drug use, and the timely referral to more intensive substance abuse treatment for those who have substance abuse disorders.” SAMHSA White paper on SBIRT in Behavioral Healthcare (4/1/11) http://www.samhsa.gov/prevention/sbirt/SBIRTwhitepaper.pdf
    89. 89. National SBIRT ATTC Goals– Goal 1. Serve as the national subject matter expert and key resource for SBIRT;– Goal 2. Broaden ATTC scope of implementation practices and system transformation for SBIRT through the development of an SBIRT suite of services;– Goal 3. Develop strategies to expand the workforce(s) that utilize SBIRT and work to insure the consistent application of the SBIRT model to insure fidelity and sustainability.
    90. 90. Team and Collaborators• ATTC regional centers, network office, and other NFAs• Brief Intervention Group (BIG) initiatives - NORC at the University of Chicago – learning communities for EAP and hospital initiatives• SAMHSA – other SBIRT funded projects – State and medical residencies grantees via POs – SAMHSA-HRSA Center for Integrated Health Systems (CIHS)• HRSA – AHECs• NIDA & NIAAA • Others – coming soon many more
    91. 91. Advisory BoardDeborah S. Finnell, DNS, PHMHP-BC, CARN-AP, FAAN - Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing Thomas E. Freese, PhD- UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs David C. Lewis, MD- Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University Karen D. Lloyd, PhD, LP- Behavioral Health Partners A. Thomas McLellan, PhD- Treatment Research Institute Faye S. Taxman, PhD- Center for Advancing Criminal Excellence at George MasonUniversitySharon Reif, PhD- Schneider Institutes for Health Policy at Brandeis University Paul Sacco, PhD- University of Maryland School of Social WorkRichard Spence, PhD- Center for Social Work Research at the University of Texas Laurie Krom, MS- National ATTC Network Coordinating Center Daniel R. Kivlahan, PhD (ex officio)- Addictive Behaviors Research Center at the University ofWashington Suzan Swanton, LCSW-C (ex officio)- Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration Rita Vandivort-Warren, MSW (ex officio)-Health Resources and Services Administration
    92. 92. Staff Peter F. Luongo, PhD - Holly Hagle, PhD – Dawn Lindsay, PhD – Principal Investigator Project Director Program EvaluatorJim Aiello, Melva Hogan, Jess Williams, Kris Pond,Project Associate Administrative Assistant Project Manager Logistics Coordinator
    93. 93. Year 1 Key events and Upcoming Key events
    94. 94. We can’t do something for everyone… but we can have something for everyone.• Work plan• Suite of services - online resources• Trainings and T/A – based on our work plans• Needs assessment• Strategic plan• Tools – clinical and implementation tools Contact us at Main phone: 412-258-8565 Fax: 412-391-2528 Office email: sbirt@attcnetwork.org

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