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The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 1 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 2 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 3 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 4 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 5 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 6 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 7 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 8 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 9 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 10 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 11 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 12 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 13 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 14 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 15 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 16 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 17 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 18 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 19 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 20 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 21 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 22 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 23 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 24 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 25 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 26 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 27 The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Slide 28
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The Business Case for Water Infrastructure

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America is fortunate to have thousands of municipal water systems to provide reliable, plentiful clean drinking water and sanitary waste disposal. But across the country, much of our infrastructure for managing wastewater and providing drinking water is inadequate, obsolete or seriously deteriorated. Despite the need for investment, the federal government’s per capita spending on water infrastructure dropped from $76 per person in 1977 to $11 per person in 2014. Continued failure to address this major infrastructure problem is increasingly detrimental to our economy and businesses nationwide.

Currently, the US is projected to lose $732-billion loss in business sales by 2029 and over $4.5 trillion by 2039; with 636,000 jobs lost each year by 2039, just from service disruptions and increasing services rates.

These estimates don’t even include the threats failing water infrastructure poses to the US economy through pollution and flooding. If we make the necessary investments in water infrastructure, however, the return will be significant job creation, a better competitive position for U.S. businesses, and resilient economic growth.

Join ASBC, Environment America, Susan Harris of Cerulean, LLC and Senator Jack Reed (D – Rhode Island) for a special webinar on how failing water infrastructure endangers our businesses and the economy and how we can fix this problem before the cost is insurmountable. Government listens to business, so learn the facts!

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The Business Case for Water Infrastructure

  1. 1. The Business Case for Water Infrastructure Webinar
  2. 2. Sustainable Agriculture High Road Workplace Infrastructure Race & Equity Climate & Energy Safe Chemicals • Serving public interests of the over 250,000 businesses represented in membership • Advocates for policy change • Informs on the opportunities for building a vibrant, broadly prosperous, sustainable economy Serving responsible businesses across industries
  3. 3. • • Overview of water infrastructure issues and the business case for water infrastructure Colton Fagundes Policy Manager at ASBC asbcouncil.org/webinars
  4. 4. • Business sign-on letter to Senate calling for emergency water infrastructure funding in appropriations • Case studies of federally funded water infrastructure projects Laura Miller Clean Water Advocate at Environment America asbcouncil.org/webinars
  5. 5. Green Storm Water Infrastructure and Nature Based Solutions: The Potential and the Business Case Susan Harris Principal at Cerulean, LLC asbcouncil.org/webinars
  6. 6. U.S. Senator Jack Reed asbcouncil.org/webinars
  7. 7. Investment Gap in Water Infrastructure asbcouncil.org/webinars • Need = $129 billion per year through 2039 • Current annual investment = $48 billion • $81 billion annual gap • Green infrastructure could save money • Federal government share of investment has fallen • Federal spending dropped from $76 per person to $11 Source: Vermont Public Radio, Taylor Dobbs
  8. 8. • Service disruptions and flooding = production delays, sales loses, and damages • Higher prices could = less foreign demand/competitiveness of U.S. manufactured goods • Household losses = less purchasing of goods and services The Economics of Water Infrastructure asbcouncil.org/webinars Water main break in Houston. Source: CNN.com
  9. 9. Failure to make necessary investments = lost business sales and jobs (This data covers loses from service disruptions and flooding, but not water pollution) • Service disruptions = business loss of $230 to $5,800 in sales per employee per day • $732 billion in lost business sales by 2029 and over $4.5 trillion by 2039 • 333,000 jobs lost by 2029 and 636,000 by 2039 The Economics of Water Infrastructure (2) asbcouncil.org/webinars
  10. 10. • Making necessary investment = economic growth and job creation • $5.6 trillion in increased business sales and 800,000 jobs created by 2039 • Economic activity around building new infrastructure • Across sector, businesses would see increased productivity and efficiency • Increased household purchasing power The Economics of Water Infrastructure (3) asbcouncil.org/webinars Source: RYAN DELANEY / WRVO NEWS FILE PHOTO
  11. 11. • Many businesses rely on clean waterbodies • Commercial fishing, outdoor recreation suppliers, boating companies, and waterside restaurants, lodging, and retail • Beverage and food manufacturers rely on clean water Pollution – Clean Water is Good for Business asbcouncil.org/webinars Breweries care about water pollution, because beer is mostly water!
  12. 12. Urban Runoff & Combined Sewage Overflows asbcouncil.org/webinars Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
  13. 13. Business Impact Case Study – Lake Hopatcong, NJ asbcouncil.org/webinars Source: New Jersey Hills Media Group, newjerseyhills.com Source: Danielle Parhizkaran/NorthJersey/com • Toxic Algae Outbreaks caused lake closure in 2019 • Urban stormwater pollution runoff major driver. Improvements in infrastructure could prevent
  14. 14. Why “the business case” for water infrastructure?
  15. 15. THE USUAL FRAMING OF THE DEBATE asbcouncil.org/webinars Environment Jobs
  16. 16. • Business sign-on letter to Senate calling for emergency water infrastructure funding in appropriations • Case studies of federally funded water infrastructure projects Laura Miller Clean Water Advocate at Environment America asbcouncil.org/webinars
  17. 17. Green Storm Water Infrastructure and Nature Based Solutions: The Potential and the Business Case Susan Harris Principal at Cerulean, LLC asbcouncil.org/webinars
  18. 18. Green Stormwater Infrastructure as a solution to Failing Grey Infrastructure • Provide environmentally sound solutions to failing infrastructure • Improve water quality • More cost effective • Aesthetic appeal • Reduces urban heat islands • Minimize flooding and combined sewer overflow Susan Harris Cerulean, LLC
  19. 19. Camden, New Jersey
  20. 20. Intercepting existing stormwater infrastructure
  21. 21. Conklin Recreation Center, Cheltenham Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania Before After
  22. 22. Stormwater Basin Retrofits Pre-Retrofit condition • Maintained as mowed turf • Failing discharge riser • Short circuiting flows • Challenging to mow & maintain • Attracts geese
  23. 23. Post Construction Condition • Flow path extend to maximize settling period through basin. • Increased capacity – Flood reduction • Volume and velocity reduced • Deeper rooted native vegetation • Reduced goose presence • Ease of maintenance
  24. 24. Stormwater Basin Retrofit Norristown, Pennsylvania Before After 156 acre drainage area
  25. 25. Philadelphia Green City, Clean Waters $0 $2 $4 $6 $8 $10 $12 Costs avoided to update grey infrastructure Investment in green stormwater infrastructure Billions Projected Cost Comparison in Billions* *Philadelphia Water Department, Green City Clean Waters, The City of Philadelphia’s Program for Combined Sewer Overflow Control Program Summary. June 2011 More than 70% of small business owners believe clean water protections help spur economic growth. 67% of small business owners are concerned that water pollution could hurt their business operations. The Delaware River supplies drinking water for 15 million people, supporting a vibrant economy and million of jobs. Data received from a survey completed by the Sustainable Business Network of Greater Philadelphia.
  26. 26. U.S. Senator Jack Reed asbcouncil.org/webinars
  27. 27. Questions? Outside Advocacy Techniques asbcouncil.org/webinars
  28. 28. Outside Advocacy Techniques asbcouncil.org/webinars Colton Fagundes cfagundes@asbcouncil.org
  • AmanSolanki28

    Feb. 17, 2021
  • ASBCouncil

    Nov. 27, 2020

America is fortunate to have thousands of municipal water systems to provide reliable, plentiful clean drinking water and sanitary waste disposal. But across the country, much of our infrastructure for managing wastewater and providing drinking water is inadequate, obsolete or seriously deteriorated. Despite the need for investment, the federal government’s per capita spending on water infrastructure dropped from $76 per person in 1977 to $11 per person in 2014. Continued failure to address this major infrastructure problem is increasingly detrimental to our economy and businesses nationwide. Currently, the US is projected to lose $732-billion loss in business sales by 2029 and over $4.5 trillion by 2039; with 636,000 jobs lost each year by 2039, just from service disruptions and increasing services rates. These estimates don’t even include the threats failing water infrastructure poses to the US economy through pollution and flooding. If we make the necessary investments in water infrastructure, however, the return will be significant job creation, a better competitive position for U.S. businesses, and resilient economic growth. Join ASBC, Environment America, Susan Harris of Cerulean, LLC and Senator Jack Reed (D – Rhode Island) for a special webinar on how failing water infrastructure endangers our businesses and the economy and how we can fix this problem before the cost is insurmountable. Government listens to business, so learn the facts!

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