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NEAIC Recommended Supplies for Asthma Home Visiting

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NEAIC Recommended Supplies for Asthma Home Visiting

  1. 1. New England Asthma Innovations Collaborative NEAIC Required/Suggested Supplies List Presented by Christine Gordon Program Coordinator, Asthma Regional Council of New England for the HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative May 1, 2013 NEAIC is organized by the Asthma Regional Council, a program of Health Resources in Action. The project described was supported by Funding Opportunity Number CMS-1C1-12-0001 from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Healthcare Innovation Award #1C1CMS331039). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of HHS or any of its agencies.
  2. 2. NEAIC Required/Suggested Supplies List May 1, 2013
  3. 3. Rationale and Development • Why • To guide sites new to home visiting • To standardize required supplies across 8 provider sites • To assist in negotiations with payers • How • ARC’s previous research: use of environmental supplies • Information from experienced site • Researched additional products from other vendors • Discussed during biweekly provider conference calls May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  4. 4. Required Supplies • HEPA vacuum cleaner • Specs: no ozone emissions • Bedding encasements for mattress and pillows • Specs: zipper enclosure (i.e. not just a cover) • Optional: box spring encasements, encasements for additional beds • Storage containers • Specs: plastic Tupperware or large plastic zip bags May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  5. 5. Required Supplies May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  6. 6. Required Supplies May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  7. 7. Required Supplies if evidence of pests Suggested for all families May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  8. 8. Suggested Supplies May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  9. 9. Going forward • Continue to update and develop the list • New products, better prices • Share with interested parties (like you!) May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative
  10. 10. Questions? Contact Christine Gordon, cgordon@hria.org Acknowledgements NEAIC is organized by the Asthma Regional Council, a program of Health Resources in Action. The project described was supported by Funding Opportunity Number CMS-1C1-120001 from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (Healthcare Innovation Award #1C1CMS331039). Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of HHS or any of its agencies. May 1, 2013 | HCIA Asthma Learning Collaborative

Editor's Notes

  • My name is Christine Gordon, and I am the Program Coordinator for the Asthma Regional Council of New England, which is a program of Health Resources of Action in Boston. I will be reviewing the list of required and suggested supplies that we developed for our HCIA award, the New England Asthma Innovations Collaborative.
  • We’re going to jump right in and look at the complete list. Some technical notes about the list—it’s an Excel spreadsheet and contains hyperlinks to suggested vendors so that our provider sites don’t have to search for them. It’s divided into 3 sections—base requirements, additional requirements for pest management, and optional. Each subsection has an explanation of the purpose of the items and some additional information. I’ll show you small sections of the list shortly. Please note that NEAIC does not endorse any of these products.
  • The original purpose of the list was to guide some of our NEAIC provider sites that were newer to home visiting, to standardize certain supplies across our 8 provider sites, and to eventually assist in negotiations with payers. Our ultimate goal is for payers to reimburse for these services and supplies, so having a list of what supplies are actually used is an important part of that process. The list was developed over several weeks. It took into account ARC’s previous research about the use of environmental supplies for its 2010 business case. We asked some of the experienced sites about which products they used in their current home visiting protocols. I researched some additional products in the interest of finding multiple vendors and the best prices. We then shared the initial list during one of our biweekly provider meetings, which helped refine the list. We actually found that developing this list was a great way to promote provider engagement and learning; they had several lively discussions about dust mites and cockroaches. Ultimately, we ended up with a useful resource that combined years of study and practice.I want to mention that the original concept for the supplies for this program was to establish a Purchaser’s Collaborative so that we could negotiate low rates for the various supplies that sites used. This did not end up working for us due to the several issues including logistics, procurement practices, and storage. We also found that vendors like Amazon already had low prices and that many sites already had negotiated rates for certain asthma management supplies.
  • Here is a brief overview of the supplies that we required each site provide each family unless they already have them. HEPA vacuums and bedding encasements are probably no surprise to you. The storage containers are required to prevent medication contamination and promote medication organization and management.
  • Here are the required supplies in the Excel spreadsheet. You’ll notice that we list several brands and vendors as well as a note to remind sites that their home visitor needs to instruct the patient’s caretaker on how to empty the vacuum.
  • This is a continuation of the required supplies. The reason there are so many is because of the variety of mattress sizes for each vendor.
  • If the home visitors find any evidence of pest infestation, the list of supplies that are required expands to include gel baits, glue traps, gauze, and boric acid (depending on the nature of the infestation and, for boric acid, the age of the child). If the infestation is severe and requires integrated pest management, the home visitors also have a list of community resources to which they can refer the family.
  • Finally, we have a list of suggested supplies. For the cleaning and asthma management supplies, we ask the home visitors to use their best judgment to determine which supplies are needed by each individual family. Supplies for each family are budgeted at about $350. Providers can spend more or less depending on the perceived need of the family.
  • Updates are made on an as-needed basis as a result of continued provider engagement. This is a living document that we add to and edit as issues, new products, or better prices arise. We have already updated it 3 times and anticipate that we will probably update it again as we further disseminate the list. We submitted it for a poster session at APHA, so we hope to reach a broader audience and get more feedback on what the best asthma management supplies are.

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