9/9 FRI 8:00 | Large-Area Planning for Florida's Varied Landscapes 3

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James Sellen

Large landholders are volunteering for long-term planning due to growth pressure from urban centers or generational changes in ownership. Tools are available under Florida law to address
conservation, development, and agricultural planning on these tracts. Planning issues differ based on the location of the landholding, its characteristics, and other uses in the vicinity. This
session imparts lessons learned from experiences with these type plans, including best practices, where they work, and where
their use is more challenging. Emphasis is placed on sector planning as authorized under Florida law, and hybrids of sector plans prepared and submitted as large-scale amendments.

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9/9 FRI 8:00 | Large-Area Planning for Florida's Varied Landscapes 3

  1. 1. Large Area Planning For Florida’s Varied LandscapesAPA Florida 2011<br />
  2. 2. Planning Context: Large Area Sector Plans and Hybrids<br />Horizon West Sector Plan, Orange County<br />West Bay Sector Plan, Bay County<br />Taylor County Vision, Taylor County<br />Mid-West Sector Plan, Escambia County<br />East Nassau Community Planning Area, Nassau County<br />Myregion.org, How Shall We Grow, Central Florida Region<br />
  3. 3. Horizon West Sector Plan<br />Area: 28,000 Acres <br />Primary Focus: Community Design<br />Secondary Focus: Beltway Construction<br /><ul><li>45k households at build out
  4. 4. Six villages
  5. 5. One town center
  6. 6. One rural settlement
  7. 7. Two championship golf courses
  8. 8. One elementary school per neighborhood
  9. 9. Two high school sites</li></li></ul><li>West Bay Sector Plan<br />Area: 80,000 Acres<br />Primary Focus: Economic Development<br />Secondary Focus: Environmental Protection<br />
  10. 10. Taylor County Vision<br />Area: 113,000 Acres<br />Primary Goal: Economic Development<br />Secondary Goal: Shared Vision for County Growth<br />
  11. 11. Escambia County Mid-West Sector Plan<br />Area: 15,000 Acres<br />Primary Focus: Community Design<br />Secondary Focus: Economic Development<br />
  12. 12. East Nassau Community Planning Area<br />Area: 24,000 Acres<br />Primary Focus: Economic Development<br />Secondary Focus: Community Design Recently Converted to Sector Plan<br />
  13. 13. myregion.org Regional Vision:How Shall We Grow?<br />Area: 7 County Central Florida Economic Regions<br />Primary Focus: Economic Development<br />Secondary Focus: Shared Vision for Regional Growth<br />
  14. 14. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Success of Large Area Planning Will Hinge on Critical Thinking and Reasoning. Successful Planning Will Incorporate High Imagination.<br />Large Area Planning may be as much about managing natural resources and solving regional water supply problems as it is about creating new communities.<br />
  15. 15. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Large Area Planning Will Emphasize Economic Development and not Regulation. <br />Regulation will be accepted as a requirement for achieving economic initiatives.<br />Planning = Regulation <br />vs. <br />Planning = Economic Development<br />
  16. 16. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Successful Plans Will Focus on Identification of Key Initiatives and Benchmarks for Measuring Achievement Of Economic Initiatives. (i.e., Six Pillars of Florida’s Economy)<br />There is a connection between the economy and the environment. Those that get it right will be the winners. <br />
  17. 17. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Successful Large Scale Planning Will Require Significant Investment in Public Engagement and the Education Of The Public To Context, Trends, Alternative, Initiatives And Benchmarks.<br />
  18. 18. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Successful Large Area Planning Takes Time<br />Champions<br />Constituency<br />Continuity<br />
  19. 19. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Vision Required as the “Top Of the Box”<br />
  20. 20. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />General Practice<br />Context must include the Economic Region<br />
  21. 21. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />Specific Practice<br />Keep the Conceptual Plan General and Flexible<br />
  22. 22. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />Specific Practice<br />Use Design Principles and Guidelines to Guide DSAP’s. <br />A Village includes complete and integrated neighborhoods, containing housing, shops, workplaces, schools, parks and civic facilities essential to daily life of Village residents<br />A variety of housing types are located generally within a 1.2 mile radius of the Village Center (shops, services, etc.)<br />As many activities as possible are located within walking distance of existing or designated transit stops<br />A Village and each of its neighborhoods includes a center focus that combines commercial, civic, cultural and recreational uses<br />
  23. 23. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />Specific Practice<br />Use DSAP to Establish Detailed Planning Requirements That Are Location Specific. <br />
  24. 24. Typical gross floor area:up to 350,000 SF<br />Maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR): 0.40<br />Permitted Uses include:<br />Single family detached and attached residential homes<br />Various retail and services<br />Business, Professional, and Government Office<br />Village Center<br />
  25. 25. Neighborhood Center<br />Maximum gross floor area:20,000 SF<br />Maximum Floor Area Ratio (FAR): 0.50<br />Permitted Uses:<br />Personal service shops<br />Specialized retail<br />Business or professional offices<br />Community and civic uses<br />Restaurants<br />Bed and Breakfast establishments<br />Single family detached and attached residential homes<br />
  26. 26. Apartment District<br />Maximum Density:20 units/acre<br />Minimum Lot Dimensions:16’ x 86’<br />Average Block Length:300 feet<br />Design of apartments will be consistent with the scale and character of development in the Village<br />
  27. 27. Townhome District<br />Maximum Density: 12 units/acre<br />Minimum Lot Dimensions:16’ x 86’<br />Typical Lot Size:20’-25’ x 125’ (requires alley)<br />Permitted Uses: Attached townhomes and accessory structures<br />
  28. 28. Maximum Density:6 units/acre<br />Minimum Lot Dimensions:<br />16’ x 110’ (Townhomes); <br />40’ x 110’ (single family detached)<br />Typical Lot Dimensions:<br />20’-25’ x 125’ (Townhomes, requires alley)<br />40’ x 125’ (requires alley)<br />45’ x 125’ (requires alley)<br />50’ x 125’ <br />Average Lot Size: 4,800 SF<br />Permitted Uses: Single Family detached residential homes, garage apartments. Townhomes allowed by special exception<br />Village Home District<br />
  29. 29. Garden Home District<br />Maximum Density: 4 units/acre<br />Minimum Lot Dimensions:<br />20’ x 110’(Townhomes);<br />40’ x 110’<br />Typical Lot Dimensions: <br />40’ x 125’ (requires alley)<br />45’ x 125’ (requires alley)<br />50’ x 125’<br />60’ x 125’<br />70’ x 125’<br />Average Lot Size:6,000 SF<br />Permitted Uses:Single Family detached residential homes, garage apartments. Townhomes allowed by special exception<br />
  30. 30. Estate District<br />Maximum Density:2 units/acre<br />Minimum Lot Dimensions:85’ x 110’<br />Typical Lot Dimensions:85’ x 160’-200’ adjacent to lakes<br />Average Lot Size:10,000 SF<br />Permitted Uses:Single Family detached residential homes, garage apartments.<br />
  31. 31. Estate Rural District<br />Maximum Density:1 unit per acre<br />Minimum Lot Size:1 acre<br />May reflect secluded tracts or existing large lot developments<br />
  32. 32. Horizon West Town Center Plan<br />
  33. 33. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />Specific Practice<br />Focus first on the sacred places, the environmental network where development should be discouraged.<br />
  34. 34. Best Practices/ Lessons Learned<br />If you want to change the regulatory paradigm,<br />you must have a good reason:<br />True Urbanism vs. New Urbanism <br />Community DNA (genetic code)<br /><ul><li>Balanced transportation planning
  35. 35. Pedestrian networks
  36. 36. Bicycle networks
  37. 37. Traffic quieted streets
  38. 38. Public transportation
  39. 39. Healthy community principles
  40. 40. Well-being
  41. 41. Environment
  42. 42. Economy
  43. 43. Social institutions
  44. 44. Children and young people</li></ul>Community DNA (genetic code)<br /><ul><li>Public realm
  45. 45. Squares and marketplaces
  46. 46. Outdoor cafes and restaurants
  47. 47. Farmers Markets
  48. 48. Community festivals
  49. 49. Appropriate human scale of architecture
  50. 50. Cellular community of short distances
  51. 51. Mixed-use shops/houses
  52. 52. Regional Context
  53. 53. Public art</li>

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