Getting to Blue
by
Going Green
Cape Cod
Commission

SNEAPA Conference – October 18, 2013
Cape Cod 208 Plan Update
Erin Perry
Special Projects Coordinator
Cape Cod Commission

Engagement Game Labs, Emerson Colleg...
Cape Cod 208 Plan Update

What is it?
Clean Water Act Section 208

The Commission was
directed to update the
1978 Plan

The Commonwealth
provided $3 million to
...
Focus on 21st Century Problems

Nitrogen:
Saline Waters

Phosphorus:
Fresh Waters

Growth &
Title 5
Limitations
Septic systems are the primary source of
nitrogen on Cape Cod
105 Watersheds
57 Embayment Watersheds
Nitrogen Removal Required
A Regional Issue
Approach to the 208 Plan Update

Watershed
Based

Stakeholder
Engagement

Maximize Benefits
of Local Planning

No Optimal
...
Four Regions
Four Regions
What is the stakeholder process?
Public Meetings

Watershed Working Groups

Goals,
Work Plan
& Roles

Affordability,
Financing

Baseline
Conditions

Techno...
Public Meetings

Goals,
Work Plan
& Roles
Advisory
Board

Affordability,
Financing

Advisory
Board
RLI
RLI

TAC

Watershed...
Applying a mix of technologies
and approaches
Looking at non-traditional
approaches first
One interactive tool
http://engagementgamelab.org

an applied research lab dedicated to
innovating the ways people participate in civic
life an...
What is
Play?
1. activity in which
means are more
valued than ends
2. non-literal,
imaginative, marked
off in some way fro...
The Power and
Productivity of
Play
creates
y
Pla
portunities for
op
l e a rn i n g
The Power and
Productivity of
Play
creates
Play
for
ies
opportunit
empathetic
reflection
The Power and
Productivity of
Play
creates
Play
fo r
rtunities
oppo
social control
Why Games?
•

•

Games frame play
– Simplify complex systems with clear rule
set
– Create clear objectives
– Provide regul...
Engagement
Games
/enˈgājmənt gām/
Noun
1.The game is the process
2. Acts of play are the real-world actions
Think like a game designer
[flow chart]
Game start  Game goal
Real Problem  Real Action

/design

Engagement
Games
[flow chart]
Game start  Game goal
Real Problem  Real Action

/design

Engagement
Games
A
GAME
FOR
planning
Gameplay
• Time-based
missions
composed
of
challenges
• Trivia
Barriers
• Face-toFace Finale
Actions
1.
Planners collect
nuanced citizen
data from larger
and more
diverse
demographics
Actions
2.
Citizens/Players
can create, fund,
rally for, and join
local community
causes
Actions
3.
Democratic
deliberation
founded on a
context of civic
learning, social
control, and trust
Reach
• Community PlanIt games played
or planned in a dozen cities
throughout the world
• Over 5000 players (so far)
• Ove...
Lateral Trust
•

Players tended not to trust in the institutions sponsoring the game
– “There’s a deep history that goes b...
Re-imagine who’s listening
Flexible Publics
• The online space creates the ability to reimagine traditional publics
and audiences to legitimize parti...
Playful Civic
Learning is the
condition of
reflection on civic
actions as one takes
them.
“I put my comment and someone
di...
Relationships are
key to creating
engaged
communities.
We need to
design playful,
relational,
systems.
Demo
Cape Cod Commission
GI
Planning Efforts
1.

EPA Technical Assistance Grant
Refine green infrastructure siting criteria
Apply to two impacted watersheds
Select and...
2012 EPA Community Partners
Technical Assistance Grant
Impaired watersheds in EJ
communities
Project Partners: Tetra Tech ...
Developing a
Site Selection Methodology
Goal: Develop a siting criteria
matrix to use in GIS analysis
Water Table Data
Soi...
Treatment Options Considered
Constructed Wetlands

Permeable Reactive Barriers

Phyto-technology
GI Siting Criteria

Co
ns
tru

Siting Criteria
outside 100 year floodplain
100 - 50 ft buffer to wetland
Zone II's - wellh...
Potential Constructed Wetlands
Apply Method to Two Watersheds

Lewis Bay

Parkers River

watershed

watershed
Horace Mann Charter School
Barnstable, MA
Elementary school has significant
open space and impervious area
High Water Tabl...
Green Infrastructure Proposed at This Site

•

Combination of enhanced (lined system)
and traditional bio-retention for
im...
Former Drive-In Site
Yarmouth, Ma
Former drive-in movie theatre
Historic wetlands were filled
with poor-quality soil
Poten...
Green Infrastructure Proposed
at this Site
Traditional Bioinfiltration
Ornamental Landscaping

Phyto-Technology
Phyto-Technologies Demonstration
project
Phyto-Technologies Demonstration Project
Preliminary Data
Next Steps
DEP 319 Stormwater grant
for school site
GI demonstration project
i.d. through 208 plan
Regional Green
Infrastr...
Cape Cod Commission
www.CapeCodCommission.org

Sharon Rooney,Chief Planner
Cape Cod Commission
srooney@capecodcommission.o...
SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue
SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue
SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue
SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue
SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue
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SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue

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Getting to Blue by Going Green

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  • 32 of the 57 embayment watersheds are shared by two or more town
    18 of those 32 watersheds require a certain % of nitrogen removal to meet water quality goals
  • Or augments
  • As we grow older, opportunities for play become harder and harder to come by
  • In reference to early planning games, an article in Architectural Forum in 1968 says the following in reference to early games such as Metropolis and Neighborhood: “A game, which reduces the world to a comprehensible whole, and gives each player the same frame of reference, can go a long way toward giving him an understanding of his own concerns in relation to the total picture.”
    I think it’s worth while to ask these questions again within a networked context.
  • Engagement games are an example of a meaningful inefficiency
    Take real world issues and feed it into the imaginative magic circle, where game mechanics help people engage with, learn more, and deliberate more deeply about the issues, form powerful groups and networks, and then take actions that couldn’t have occurred otherwise
  • Engagement games are an example of a meaningful inefficiency
    Take real world issues and feed it into the imaginative magic circle, where game mechanics help people engage with, learn more, and deliberate more deeply about the issues, form powerful groups and networks, and then take actions that couldn’t have occurred otherwise
  • Funding platform and networking tool
    -can also download the data for themselves
  • Increased trust between people and government, and people and other people
  • - Making data available and making data community property
    - Most people
  • Increased trust between people and government, and people and other people
  • SNEAPA 2013 Friday h4 3_15_getting to blue

    1. 1. Getting to Blue by Going Green Cape Cod Commission SNEAPA Conference – October 18, 2013
    2. 2. Cape Cod 208 Plan Update Erin Perry Special Projects Coordinator Cape Cod Commission Engagement Game Labs, Emerson College Dr. Eric Gordon, Director Stephen Walter, Managing Director Cape Cod Commission and Green Infrastructure Sharon Rooney AICP, RLA Chief Planner Cape Cod Commission
    3. 3. Cape Cod 208 Plan Update What is it?
    4. 4. Clean Water Act Section 208 The Commission was directed to update the 1978 Plan The Commonwealth provided $3 million to fund the project
    5. 5. Focus on 21st Century Problems Nitrogen: Saline Waters Phosphorus: Fresh Waters Growth & Title 5 Limitations
    6. 6. Septic systems are the primary source of nitrogen on Cape Cod
    7. 7. 105 Watersheds
    8. 8. 57 Embayment Watersheds
    9. 9. Nitrogen Removal Required
    10. 10. A Regional Issue
    11. 11. Approach to the 208 Plan Update Watershed Based Stakeholder Engagement Maximize Benefits of Local Planning No Optimal Solutions Goal: To generate a series of approaches in each watershed that will meet water quality standards
    12. 12. Four Regions
    13. 13. Four Regions
    14. 14. What is the stakeholder process?
    15. 15. Public Meetings Watershed Working Groups Goals, Work Plan & Roles Affordability, Financing Baseline Conditions Technology Options Review Watershed Scenarios July August September October December 208 Planning Process
    16. 16. Public Meetings Goals, Work Plan & Roles Advisory Board Affordability, Financing Advisory Board RLI RLI TAC Watershed Working Groups Baseline Conditions Advisory Board RLI RLI Finance Finance TAC Advisory Board RLI RLI Finance Finance August September RLI RLI RLI RLI Technical Advisory Committee of Cape Cod Water Protection Collaborative Tech Panel RLI RLI Finance Finance Tech Panel October Tech Panel December Regulatory, Legal & Institutional Work Group TAC Watershed Scenarios Advisory Board Finance Finance TAC Tech Panel July Technology Options Review 208 Planning Process
    17. 17. Applying a mix of technologies and approaches
    18. 18. Looking at non-traditional approaches first
    19. 19. One interactive tool
    20. 20. http://engagementgamelab.org an applied research lab dedicated to innovating the ways people participate in civic life and expanding the study of playful citizenship in a digital era.
    21. 21. What is Play? 1. activity in which means are more valued than ends 2. non-literal, imaginative, marked off in some way from reality (aka magic circle) “Let my play be my learning and my learning be my play” -Johann Huizinga (1938)
    22. 22. The Power and Productivity of Play creates y Pla portunities for op l e a rn i n g
    23. 23. The Power and Productivity of Play creates Play for ies opportunit empathetic reflection
    24. 24. The Power and Productivity of Play creates Play fo r rtunities oppo social control
    25. 25. Why Games? • • Games frame play – Simplify complex systems with clear rule set – Create clear objectives – Provide regular feedback towards achieving those objectives – Provide opportunity for reflection Add element of fun – Discovery – Exploration – Challenge
    26. 26. Engagement Games /enˈgājmənt gām/ Noun 1.The game is the process 2. Acts of play are the real-world actions
    27. 27. Think like a game designer
    28. 28. [flow chart] Game start  Game goal Real Problem  Real Action /design Engagement Games
    29. 29. [flow chart] Game start  Game goal Real Problem  Real Action /design Engagement Games
    30. 30. A GAME FOR planning
    31. 31. Gameplay • Time-based missions composed of challenges • Trivia Barriers • Face-toFace Finale
    32. 32. Actions 1. Planners collect nuanced citizen data from larger and more diverse demographics
    33. 33. Actions 2. Citizens/Players can create, fund, rally for, and join local community causes
    34. 34. Actions 3. Democratic deliberation founded on a context of civic learning, social control, and trust
    35. 35. Reach • Community PlanIt games played or planned in a dozen cities throughout the world • Over 5000 players (so far) • Over five thousand dollars raised for community causes • Over 45,000 comments made
    36. 36. Lateral Trust • Players tended not to trust in the institutions sponsoring the game – “There’s a deep history that goes back decades in the city of Detroit particularly with community planning issues of people being told this is what it’s going to be or having a community planning input session as just a formality because the law says we have to take community input. So we’ll write people’s input down on a piece of paper and then put it on a shelf somewhere.” – Detroit player • Players came to the game through social connections or trusted community organizations • Through game play, players developed lateral trust relationships that would affect their social framing of issues and willingness to engage.
    37. 37. Re-imagine who’s listening
    38. 38. Flexible Publics • The online space creates the ability to reimagine traditional publics and audiences to legitimize participation • Generational publics – “I think there were kids in 8th grade doing this. I think like, oh my god, even kids can be involved. I do think kids have to be involved because they’re the next generation […] We’re just ignoring them all the time. Some [of their ideas] are probably better than a grownup person could have” – Detroit player – “They sound so fresh, so honest, so unbiased” – Detroit player – Likewise, youth spoke about the adult public as legitimate, or making the process real for them.
    39. 39. Playful Civic Learning is the condition of reflection on civic actions as one takes them. “I put my comment and someone disagreed with it. It made me really think, ‘Wait. Maybe they are right.’ Even now I don't really know who's right, but I feel like it made me really think about what I thought prior”
    40. 40. Relationships are key to creating engaged communities. We need to design playful, relational, systems.
    41. 41. Demo
    42. 42. Cape Cod Commission GI Planning Efforts
    43. 43. 1. EPA Technical Assistance Grant Refine green infrastructure siting criteria Apply to two impacted watersheds Select and design two pilot projects 2. 3. Phyto-technology demonstration project Next Steps…
    44. 44. 2012 EPA Community Partners Technical Assistance Grant Impaired watersheds in EJ communities Project Partners: Tetra Tech & Town DPWs Develop GI siting tool Design pilot projects Regulatory pathways Preliminary cost estimates
    45. 45. Developing a Site Selection Methodology Goal: Develop a siting criteria matrix to use in GIS analysis Water Table Data Soils Data Open Space Other factors Task: Evaluate site suitability of GI by listing treatment options against a list of potential GIS shapefiles
    46. 46. Treatment Options Considered Constructed Wetlands Permeable Reactive Barriers Phyto-technology
    47. 47. GI Siting Criteria Co ns tru Siting Criteria outside 100 year floodplain 100 - 50 ft buffer to wetland Zone II's - wellhead protection areas Soils: disturbed Soils: well drained Soils: poorly drained, clay (per soil survey) not protected open space outside priority habitat depth to groundwater > 4' depth to groundwater <10' parcels >5 acres municipally owned, not protected open space ct ed Pe rm W et ea la bl Ph nd e yt s Re o ac te ch t no ive Ba lo gy rri e rs x = all parcels which contain these positive siting criteria (desirable for project siting) Mandatory siting criteria Bonus siting criteria GI - Wastewater x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x
    48. 48. Potential Constructed Wetlands
    49. 49. Apply Method to Two Watersheds Lewis Bay Parkers River watershed watershed
    50. 50. Horace Mann Charter School Barnstable, MA Elementary school has significant open space and impervious area High Water Table High Public Exposure Public Ownership Connection to adjacent community center and ball fields
    51. 51. Green Infrastructure Proposed at This Site • Combination of enhanced (lined system) and traditional bio-retention for improved stormwater treatment
    52. 52. Former Drive-In Site Yarmouth, Ma Former drive-in movie theatre Historic wetlands were filled with poor-quality soil Potential marina redevelopment plans Partially located within a hazardous floodplain with high groundwater table
    53. 53. Green Infrastructure Proposed at this Site Traditional Bioinfiltration Ornamental Landscaping Phyto-Technology
    54. 54. Phyto-Technologies Demonstration project
    55. 55. Phyto-Technologies Demonstration Project Preliminary Data
    56. 56. Next Steps DEP 319 Stormwater grant for school site GI demonstration project i.d. through 208 plan Regional Green Infrastructure plan for Cape Cod
    57. 57. Cape Cod Commission www.CapeCodCommission.org Sharon Rooney,Chief Planner Cape Cod Commission srooney@capecodcommission.org Erin Perry, Special Projects Coordinator Cape Cod Commission eperry@capecodcommission.org Dr. Eric Gordon, Director- Engagement Game Lab Emerson College eric_gordon@emerson.edu Stephen Walter, ManagingDirector- Engagement Game Lab Emerson College steve@engagementgamelab.org

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