Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms By Aneek Gupta

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Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms By Aneek Gupta

Heart muscle diseases, Heart valve disorders, Arrhythmias, Congenital heart defects, Thyroid disorders, Alcohol abuse, Too much vitamin E, vitamin E, Coronary Artery Disease, Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, Heart Failure, Heart Failure Symptoms, Swelling in abdomen (ascites), Pulmonary edema (excess fluid in lungs), Pumping action of the heart grows weaker, Swelling in ankles and legs, Coughing, Tiredness, Shortness of breath, Pleural effusion (excess fluid around lungs), Heart Attack Signs, Chest discomfort or pain—uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of the chest that can be mild or strong, This discomfort or pain lasts more than a few minutes or goes away and comes back, Upper body discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw, or stomach, Other signs include nausea (feeling sick to your stomach), vomiting, lightheadedness or fainting, or breaking out in a cold sweat, Aneek, Aneek Gupta

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Heart Attack Signs and Symptoms By Aneek Gupta

  1. 1. ek ne If you think you or someone you know may be having a heart attack Call 9–1–1 within a few minutes—5 at the most—of the start of symptoms. If your symptoms stop completely in less than 5 minutes, still call your doctor. Only take an ambulance to the hospital. Going in a private car can delay treatment. Take a nitroglycerin pill if your doctor has prescribed this type of medicine. Put an aspirin under your tongue. Aspirin reduces blood clotting and can help keep a heart attack from getting worse. But don’t delay calling 9–1–1 to take an aspirin. Source: National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health. www.nhlbi.nih.gov
  2. 2. ek A heart attack occurs when blood flow to a section of heart muscle becomes blocked. If the flow of blood isn’t restored quickly, the section of heart muscle becomes damaged from lack of oxygen and begins to die. Coronary artery ne Blood flow Dead heart muscle Blood Clot blocks artery Blood Clot Plaque in artery In Coronary Artery Disease, a fatty material called plaque builds up over many years on the inside walls of the coronary arteries (the arteries that supply blood and oxygen to your heart). Eventually, an area of plaque can rupture, causing a blood clot to form on the surface of the plaque. If the clot becomes large enough, it can mostly or completely block the flow of oxygen-rich blood to the part of the heart muscle fed by the artery. Once the flow of blood is blocked, a heart attack will happen when a part of the heart muscle becomes damaged. After a heart attack, if the blockage is not treated and removed within a few hours, the damaged heart muscle will begin to die and be replaced by scar tissue. Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. www.nhlbi.nih.gov LifeART Collection Images Copyright © 1989-2001 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, MD
  3. 3. ek ne Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. www.nhlbi.nih.gov
  4. 4. ek ne Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. www.nhlbi.nih.gov
  5. 5. ek ne Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute. www.nhlbi.nih.gov

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