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Using Change Management to Transform Your Library (April 2018)

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Using Change Management to Transform Your Library (April 2018)

  1. 1. C AT H E R I N E S O E H N E R J . W I L L AR D M AR R I O T T L I B R ARY U N I V E R S I T Y O F U TAH AP R I L 2 0 1 8 Managing Change: How to keep your sanity in an ever-changing world
  2. 2. Scenario: New Library Director  Close the main reference desk.  Incorporate reference into the circulation desk.  Put a coffee shop where the desk used to be. Photo by Catherine Soehner
  3. 3. What would you have liked me to do differently as your new director when delivering this message? Select all that apply.  A. Provide reasons about why you are making this decision.  B. Provide an opportunity for feedback before a final decision is made.  C. Help us understand how this is good for the library.  D. Give me a chance to tell you why I think this is a bad idea.  E. Other, please describe. Photo by Stefan Baudy, CC BY
  4. 4. Objectives Leadership  Apply a set of tools and best practices for invoking change  Least amount of upset  Most amount of getting to goals Employees  Tools to survive and keep your sanity in an ever-changing environment  Your power in an organization  Where you have and do not have control
  5. 5. Outline  My background  Change Management Resources  Systems Theory from Barry Oshry  Feedback  Transparency  Communication – what, when, how much  Re-thinking resistance
  6. 6. My Background  20 years of leadership and management experience Photos by Elizabeth Skene, from http://library.ucsc.edu/science, by Mlibrary, and Catherine Soehner
  7. 7. What type of library do you work in? • Academic • Public • School • Government • Special – Private Company • Other, please describe
  8. 8. Change Management Resources Eckel, Peter, Green, M., Hill, B., & Mallon, W. (1999). On Change III - Taking Charge of Change: A Primer for Colleges and Universities. Washington, D.C.: American Council on Education. Kotter, John. "Leading Change: Why Transformation Efforts Fail.” HBR Articles, 2007: 1-10. Hanleybrown, Fay, John Kania, and Mark Kramer. “Channeling change: Making collective impact work.” Stanford Social Innovation Review 20 (2012): 1-8. Judge, William Q., R. Steven Terrell. “Navigating the White Water of Organization-Wide Change.” Chapter 4, 51-72. In: Carter, Louis. Change Champion’s Field Guide: Strategies and Tools for Leading Change in Your Organization (2nd Edition) : John Wiley & Sons.
  9. 9. Common Features Kotter; and Judge & Terrell • Create Urgency • Form a Powerful Guiding Coalition • Create a Vision • Communicate the Vision • Empower Others to Act • Plan for and Create Short-term Wins • Consolidate Improvements • Institutionalize New Approaches Eckel, et.al. • Create the Context • Lead with Teams • Develop Change Strategies • Engage the Campus Community • Deploy Resources • Provide Evidence of Change Hanleybrown, et.al. • Backbone Support • Common Agenda • Continuous Communication • Mutually Reinforcing Activities • Shared Measurement Communication is Key!
  10. 10. Systems Thinking The Possibilities of Organization By Barry Oshry
  11. 11. Systems Thinking  Typical = Internal Warfare  People respond based on their place in the organizational structure Photo by Ryan Roberts, CC-BY,SA
  12. 12. Bottoms  We see negative conditions  We believe others (higher ups) could fix these conditions if they chose to… and, they don’t It is a world in which our lives and the organization’s life are in the hands of others, higher-ups, and they are making a mess of it. Photo by Nathan Rupert, CC BY-NC-ND
  13. 13. Middles  Between two or more people in the organization who are in disagreement  Or have differing priorities or perspectives It is a world in which we get little positive feedback from anyone Photo by Nathan Rupert, CC BY-NC-ND
  14. 14. Tops We are responsible for some operation or a piece of it We suck up all responsibility to ourselves and away from others Leads to feeling burdened Photo by Nathan Rupert, CC BY-NC-ND
  15. 15. Q&A Where are you? Top Middle Bottom Photo by Nathan Rupert, CC BY-NC-ND
  16. 16. Q&A How many of you recognize the “Us Against Them” or “Internal Warfare” in your library? • Yes • No Photo by Ryan Roberts, CC-BY,SA
  17. 17. Q&A For those of you who answered “yes” in the last question, how many of you would like to change this dynamic? • Yes • No
  18. 18. The Way Out  Individual choices  Recognize how we contribute  Freedom to act differently  Hope = Partnership Photo by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, CC-BY
  19. 19. Outline  My background  Change Management Resources  Systems Theory from Barry Oshry  Feedback  Transparency  Communication – what, when, how much  Re-thinking resistance
  20. 20. Feedback  What do we expect or hope will happen when we are asked to give feedback?  Example: Food and Drink in the Library
  21. 21. Feedback – Food & Drink A. People will leave a mess B. Food leads to pests C. Food and pests damage books D. What about Special Collections E. The smell! F. Libraries are not cafes G. I don’t want to be the food police H. I want to have positive interactions with users I. This is a good idea
  22. 22. Response – Food & Drink  Thank you  Plan is to move forward with allowing food and drink  Not in Special Collections
  23. 23. Feedback – Q&A For those of you whose feedback was not incorporated, did you think I considered your ideas? • Yes • No
  24. 24. Response – Food & Drink A. People will leave a mess B. Food leads to pests C. Food and pests damage books D. What about Special Collections E. The smell! F. Libraries are not cafes G. I don’t want to be the food police H. I want to have positive interactions with users I. This is a good idea
  25. 25. Feedback – Q&A For those of you whose feedback was not incorporated, did you think I considered your ideas? • Yes • No
  26. 26. Feedback Toward Partnership  Employees  Included in the decision making process  Not everyone will see our opinions as we do  You are still valued, respected, and appreciated  Leadership  Not everyone is going to agree with you  Listen without judgement  Be prepared for passionate and strong opinions  Be ready to adjust the original idea
  27. 27. Feedback to the Boss  Is the decision final?  Do you have new information?  How important is it?  Connect feedback to organization’s and manager’s goals  Provide actionable suggestions  Curiosity is your friend
  28. 28. Feedback from Others  I don’t know what is going on!  Library Administration isn’t listening to the people on the front lines.  You really could have done that better.  You should have told my group first.  All the work I’ve done in my career is not appreciated.
  29. 29. Feedback  What do we do with all this feedback?  How do we work in partnership? Photo by Virtual EyeSee, CCBY
  30. 30. Evaluating Feedback Stone, Douglas, and Sheila Heen. Thanks for the feedback: The science and art of receiving feedback well. Penguin UK, 2014.
  31. 31. Tell Me More Move from “That’s just wrong” to “Tell me more.” --Douglas Stone & Sheila Heen
  32. 32. What Was Said “I don’t know what’s going on!”
  33. 33. What Was Meant “I don’t know what’s going on!” What she really meant: 1. I don’t know what’s going to happen next. 2. I’m confused about a decision and the timing of the announcement. 3. I just don’t like it.
  34. 34. Feedback Toward Partnership  As often as possible ask for feedback  Use “Tell me more” and similar questions  (Curiosity is your friend)  Listen without judgement or defensiveness  Take time to think
  35. 35. Outline  My background  Change Management Resources  Systems Theory from Barry Oshry  Feedback  Transparency  Communication – what, when, how much  Re-thinking resistance
  36. 36. Transparency  What do we expect or hope will happen when our boss says they are going to be transparent?
  37. 37. Transparency  What do we expect or hope will happen when our boss says they are going to be transparent? • Example: We will be closing the main reference desk because of reasons A, B, and C.
  38. 38. Communication is the Key  When  How much  What Jick, Todd D. “Recipients of Change.” In Organization change : a comprehensive reader. Edited by W. Warner Burke, Dale G. Lake, and Jill Waymire Paine, 404-417. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Photo by Catherine Soehner, CC-BY
  39. 39. Communication - When First, managerial secrecy probably has no positive value… Greenhalgh, Leonard and Todd Jick, “Survivor Sense Making and Reaction to Organizational Decline,” Management Communications Quarterly, 2, (February 1989): 305-327.
  40. 40. Communication – How Much?  First drafts  Feedback and more drafts  Decision making process
  41. 41. Communication - What  Clarify expectations  What is and is not changing  Listen for where your employees will have to take big risks Jick, Todd D. “Recipients of Change.” In Organization change : a comprehensive reader. Edited by W. Warner Burke, Dale G. Lake, and Jill Waymire Paine, 404-417. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008. Photo by Jason Eppink, CC-BY
  42. 42. Re-thinking Resistance  An indicator that change is already underway  Important information can come from resistors  Unearth core values  Working toward change Jick, Todd D. “Recipients of Change.” In Organization change : a comprehensive reader. Edited by W. Warner Burke, Dale G. Lake, and Jill Waymire Paine, 404-417. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008.
  43. 43. Conclusion It is a fundamental tenet of participative management that employees are more likely to support what they help create... Jick, Todd D. “Recipients of Change.” In Organization change : a comprehensive reader. Edited by W. Warner Burke, Dale G. Lake, and Jill Waymire Paine, 404-417. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2008.
  44. 44. Thank you  Anthony Bole  Melanie Hawks  Alberta Comer  Steven Bell
  45. 45. Questions? Catherine Soehner University of Utah, catherine.soehner@utah.edu Photo by U-EET. Used with permission.
  46. 46. Transparency and Feedback Disagreement ≠ They are not listening They don’t respect, value, or appreciate me Disagreement = They disagree with me

Editor's Notes

  • Dealing with the nay-sayers, freak-outs, and doomsday predictors
  • Even when I’m at the top of the library organizational chart, I am a peon in the overall University. I sometimes find myself sounding like someone at the bottom.
    Snow not plowed
    Coke vs. Pepsi
    What are your examples of where you fit in?
  • Even when I’m at the top of the library organizational chart, I am a peon in the overall University. I sometimes find myself sounding like someone at the bottom.
    Snow not plowed
    Coke vs. Pepsi
    What are your examples of where you fit in?
  • Even when I’m at the top of the library organizational chart, I am a peon in the overall University. I sometimes find myself sounding like someone at the bottom.
    Snow not plowed
    Coke vs. Pepsi
    What are your examples of where you fit in?
  • First, managerial secrecy probably has no positive value, even when management is undecided about the details of a forthcoming change. . . . [I]t seems better to share top management’s thinking about prospective changes than to attempt to conceal them. Given the propensity for such information to leak, and the strength and dynamics of rumor networks, attempts to conceal are likely to have limited success at best, and will most likely result in uncontrolled message content.”
  • clarify expectations; desc
    Jason Eppink
    ribe specifically what is and is not changing; and listen to where employees feel the biggest risks will be involved for them

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