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Jacobson and Mackey: Metaliteracy Workshop

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Jacobson and Mackey: Metaliteracy Workshop

  1. 1. “Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners” 90-minute workshop Wednesday, June 25, 2014, 2:30pm Eastern 1 Trudi E. Jacobson Thomas P. Mackey Welcome!
  2. 2. Today’s Webinar 1. What is Metaliteracy? 2. Trends in Social Media 3. Learning Objectives 4. Role in the Draft ACRL Framework 5. From Theory to Practice Case Study 1: Gen Ed IL One Credit Course Case Study 2: Digital Storytelling Online Course 6. Metaliteracy Resources 2
  3. 3. WHAT IS METALITERACY? 3
  4. 4. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “Metaliteracy expands the scope of traditional information skills (determine, access, locate, understand, produce, and use information) to include the collaborative production and sharing of information in participatory digital environments (collaborate, participate, produce, and share)” (p. 1).
  5. 5. 5 Figure developed by Mackey, Jacobson, & Roger Lipera Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  6. 6. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “Metaliteracy is not about introducing yet another literacy format, but rather reinventing an existing one, information literacy, the critical foundation literacy that informs many others while being flexible and adaptive enough to evolve and change over time” (p. 1-2).
  7. 7. Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners (Mackey and Jacobson, 2014). “While literacy is focused on reading and writing, and information literacy has strongly emphasized search and retrieval, metaliteracy is about what happens beyond these abilities to promote the collaborative production and sharing of information” (p. 6).
  8. 8. The meta in metaliteracy 8
  9. 9. “…denoting change, transformation, permutation, or substitution…” “…a prefix to technical terms to denote software, data, etc., which operate at a higher level of abstraction.” 9
  10. 10. Metacognition 10 “cognition about cognition or thinking about one’s own thinking…” http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Thi nker_Musee_Rodin.jpg Metacognition in Learning and Instruction: Theory, Research and Practice, Hope J. Hartman (2002)
  11. 11. TRENDS IN SOCIAL MEDIA 11
  12. 12. Social Media Update 2013 • “73% of online adults now use social networking sites” • “42% of online adults now use multiple social networking sites, but Facebook remains platform of choice.” • “71% of online adults are now Facebook users, a slight increase from the 67% of online adults who used Facebook as of late 2012.” http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Social-Media-Update/Main-Findings.aspx
  13. 13. Creators and Curators • Creators: “54% of adult internet users post original photos or videos online that they themselves have created.” • Curators: “47% of adult internet users take photos or videos that they have found online and repost them on sites designed for sharing images with many people.” http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Photos-and-videos/Main-Findings.aspx
  14. 14. Horizon Report 2014: Key Trends • Growing ubiquity of Social Media (1-2 years) • Integration of online, hybrid and collaborative learning (1-2 years) • Rise of data driven learning assessment (3-5 years) 14 http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-he-EN-SC.pdf
  15. 15. Horizon Report 2014: Key Trends • Shift from students as consumers to students as creators (3-5 years) • Agile approaches to change (5+ years) • Evolution of online learning (5+ years) 15 http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-he-EN-SC.pdf
  16. 16. Horizon Report 2014: Challenges • Digital fluency of faculty • Lack of rewards for teaching • Competition from new models of education • Scaling teaching innovations • Expanding access • Keeping education relevant 16 http://cdn.nmc.org/media/2014-nmc-horizon-report-he-EN-SC.pdf
  17. 17. 17 2012 Paris OER Declaration “Bridge the digital divide by developing adequate infrastructure, in particular, affordable broadband connectivity, widespread mobile technology and reliable electrical power supply.” “Improve media and information literacy and encourage the development and use of OER in open standard digital formats.” http://www.unesco.org/new/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/HQ/CI/CI/pdf/ Events/Paris%20OER%20Declaration_01.pdf
  18. 18. https://opensuny.coursesites.com
  19. 19. http://opensuny.org/omp/index.php/SUNYOpenTextbooks
  20. 20. METALITERACY LEARNING OBJECTIVES 20
  21. 21. 21 Figure developed by Mackey, Jacobson and Roger Lipera Mackey and Jacobson (2014) Metaliteracy: Reinventing Information Literacy to Empower Learners
  22. 22. Metaliteracy Learning Objectives Goal 1: Evaluate content critically, including dynamic, online content that changes and evolves, such as article preprints, blogs, and wikis. 22 http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/
  23. 23. Goal 1 Learning Objectives Behavioral and Cognitive – Evaluate user response as an active researcher; understand the differing natures of feedback mechanisms and context in traditional and social media platforms – Place an information source in its context (for example, author’s purpose, format of information, and delivery mode) in order to ascertain the value of the material for that particular situation 23
  24. 24. Goal 2: Understand personal privacy, information ethics, and intellectual property issues in changing technology environments 24 http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/ Metaliteracy Learning Objectives
  25. 25. Goal 3: Share information and collaborate in a variety of participatory environments 25 http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/ Metaliteracy Learning Objectives
  26. 26. Goal 3 Learning Objectives Metacognitive and Cognitive Demonstrate the ability to translate information presented in one manner to another in order to best meet the needs of particular audiences; Integrate information from multiple sources into coherent new forms Affective and Behavioral Effectively communicate personal and professional experiences to inform and assist others; and recognize that learners can also be teachers 26
  27. 27. Goal 4: Demonstrate ability to connect learning and research strategies with lifelong learning processes and personal, academic, and professional goals 27 http://metaliteracy.org/learning-objectives/ Metaliteracy Learning Objectives
  28. 28. ROLE IN THE DRAFT ACRL IL FRAMEWORK Definition, knowledge practices, dispositions 28
  29. 29. Current Draft • Elements of metaliteracy learning objectives integrated into knowledge practices/abilities and dispositions • Draft new definition of IL incorporating elements from metaliteracy • Metaliteracy is referenced in the new introduction, as well as in Setting the Context
  30. 30. New Definition (draft) Information literacy is a repertoire of understandings, practices, and dispositions focused on flexible engagement with the information ecosystem, underpinned by critical self-reflection. The repertoire involves finding, evaluating, interpreting, managing, and using information to answer questions and develop new ones; and creating new knowledge through ethical participation in communities of learning, scholarship, and practice.
  31. 31. Sample Knowledge Practices Scholarship is a Conversation Learners who are developing their information literate abilities: • Contribute to scholarly conversation at an appropriate level (local online community, guided discussion, undergraduate research journal, conference presentation/poster session). • Critically evaluate contributions made by others in participatory information environments. 31
  32. 32. Question Break • Have you applied elements of metaliteracy in your instruction? • What challenges are raised by these changes? • What are the rewards? 32
  33. 33. FROM THEORY TO PRACTICE Two case studies
  34. 34. CASE STUDY 1: GEN ED IL COURSE (ONE CREDIT) 34
  35. 35. 35 UNL205x Learning Objectives Students will be able to: Core Metaliteracy Learning Objectives Supporting Coursework in UNL205x Provide a rationale for the idea that not all information is created equal Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher, Create a Context for User- generated Information, Evaluate Dynamic Content Critically Course readings, team application exercises, blog posts, individual assignments, online research guide creation Distinguish the differing strengths of various types of information sources Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode Course readings, team application exercises, individual assignments, online research guide creation Locate efficiently a range of appropriate information sources Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode Team application exercises, individual assignments, online research guide creation Critique information sources considering appropriate evaluative elements Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher, Create a Context for User- generated Information, Evaluate Course readings, team application exercises, blog posts, individual assignments, online research guide creation Create and share information appropriate to a purpose using web- based applications Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats Share Information in Participatory Environments Individual web-based discovery and creation projects, team application exercises, online research guide creation Analyze the importance of information-related topics in today’s world Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues Assigned videos, blog postings, class discussions, online research guide creation Table 6.1: Mapping Core Metaliteracy Learning Objectives for UNL205x
  36. 36. Aligning Learning Objectives Course Create and share using web applications ML Produce original content in multiple formats Application Individual contribution to scholarly conversation 36
  37. 37. Assignment Use a Web-based social media tool such as Glogster, Voki, Go Animate, Timetoast, or another tool of your choice to enhance the information your team has found on its topic. This project is initially an individual project. Be creative yet informative in creating a new information source. Present something new, fill in gaps, comment, analyze. Do not rehash. 37
  38. 38. Tools Created • Videos • Lesson Plan (Fishtree) • Glogster Page • Word Cloud • Timeline • Survey • Concept Map 38
  39. 39. Reflection on the Social Media Project (Metacognition) What did the process of doing this assignment feel like? Was it empowering? Traumatizing? Interesting? Challenging? And will you do something like this again (or have you done it before?) 39
  40. 40. SOCIAL MEDIA PROJECT REFLECTION Completed on social media 40
  41. 41. Aligning Learning Objectives Course Create and share using web applications ML Share in participatory environments Application Team-based research guide 41
  42. 42. Team Project from Fall 2012
  43. 43. Aligning with the Draft ACRL IL Framework • Team assignment connected with the Scholarship is a Conversation frame • Students provided with brief definition and the learning objectives • Teams were asked to develop a lesson plan that would teach first year students about this concept 43
  44. 44. Scholarship is Conversation Teaching Module (Team Slytherin)
  45. 45. Aligning Learning Objectives Course Distinguish differing strengths of types of info sources ML Understand format type and delivery mode Application Exercise comparing information types 45
  46. 46. Exercise that didn’t quite work • Find one text and one visual (infographic) information source on the increase of information available with the advent of the Internet • You want to make sure that both are sources that have value. Jot down the criteria you used to determine their value. (There might be one list that applies to both, but you might also include criteria that only apply to text, or to the visualization). 46
  47. 47. CASE STUDY 2: DIGITAL STORYTELLING (ONLINE) 47
  48. 48. What is Digital Storytelling? “Digital stories are currently created using nearly every digital device in an ever-growing toolbox. They are experienced by a large population. Their creators are sometimes professionals, and also amateurs. They can be deeply personal, or posthumanly otherwise, fiction and nonfiction, brief or epic, wrought from a single medium or sprawling across dozens” (Alexander, 2011, p. 3). 48
  49. 49. 49 Digital Storytelling Learning Objectives Metaliteracy Learning Objectives Coursework in Digital Storytelling Students will learn about the theory and practice of digital storytelling across a range of media. Understand Format Type and Delivery Mode Course readings and online discussions, virtual field trips Students will learn about different applications of digital storytelling that have emerged and how these applications can be adapted to their professional work as well as their personal lives and those of their clients. Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats Course readings and online discussions, virtual field trips, and the creation of original story projects Students will learn about personal storytelling and how it can be implemented with digital media. Understand Personal Privacy, Information Ethics and Intellectual Property Issues Virtual field trips, and the creation of original story projects Students will learn about effective digital design. Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats Course readings and online discussions, virtual field trips, and the creation of original story projects Students will learn about new tools and frameworks for storytelling with digital media. Produce Original Content in Multiple Media Formats, Share Information in Participatory Environments Virtual field trips, and the creation of original story projects Students will be able to critically assess digital storytelling projects that they encounter. Evaluate User Feedback as Active Researcher, Create a Context for User- generated Information, Evaluate Dynamic Content Critically Course readings and online discussions, virtual field trips, digital storytelling rubric, and the creation of original story projects Table 7.1: Mapping the Metaliteracy Model to Digital Storytelling
  50. 50. 50 http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu Sample Rubric: http://sites.fcps.org/trt/sites/default/files/SampleRubric.pdf
  51. 51. Metacognitive Questions • What inspired you to tell this story? Why is it important? • Who was your intended audience? What emotions did you intend to evoke (if any)? • What was your creative process during the activity? • What technical considerations helped or hindered the project? • What did you find most challenging? What was the highlight of the experience for you? • What did you learn that will assist you in developing future digital stories? 51 Nicola Allain, Digital Storytelling, SUNY Empire State College
  52. 52. METALITERACY OPEN EDUCATION RESOURCES (OERS) MOOCS, Badging, Blog 52
  53. 53. Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) ConnectivistMOOCs Real world environment Online communities Interactive video conferences Integrating social media Synchronous and asynchronous Lifelong learning or credit? X-MOOCs Common platform Defined Modules High end video Online discussions “Business model” Learning analytics Asynchronous Professional certificates or credit?
  54. 54. http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com MOOC
  55. 55. MOOC Talk: Bryan Alexander and Nicola Allain Metaliteracy MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  56. 56. MOOC Talk: Paul Prinsloo, UNISA, South Africa Metaliteracy MOOC http://metaliteracy.cdlprojects.com
  57. 57. 57 Innovative Instruction Technology Grant (IITG) + “Designing Innovative Online Learning: Integrating a Coursera MOOC with Open SUNY Badging” http://commons.suny.edu/iitg/designing-innovative-online-learning- integrating-a-coursera-mooc-with-open-suny-badging/ Our next project…
  58. 58. 58
  59. 59. 59 Master Evaluator Content Analysis Search Queries Info. Sources Database Searching Evaluation Points Currency Relevance Authority Accuracy Purpose Packaging & Sharing Format Mode Perpectives & Responses Author's Voice Degrees of Separation Giving Credit Collab- orative Creation Speaking Out Informed Consumer Individual Creation Peer Review User Response Master Evaluator Badge Feedback Mechanisms
  60. 60. 60 http://metaliteracy.org
  61. 61. QUESTIONS? 61
  62. 62. 62 Trudi E. Jacobson, M.L.S., M.A. Distinguished Librarian Head, Information Literacy Department University Libraries University at Albany, SUNY Tom Mackey, Ph.D. Dean Center for Distance Learning Empire State College, SUNY

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