Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

FEMA Floodway and 100-year Floodplain: Impacts to New Building Construction or Renovation

2,919 views

Published on

Gain a better understanding of the challenges dealing with the floodway and floodplain with respect to building construction and renovation. Presenters of this course will provide an overview on NFIP (National Flood Insurance Program) and current state/federal floodplain regulations and also discuss differences between the floodway and the 100-year floodplain to help designers determine if projects have the potential to be impacted. An overview on various FEMA permits that are required for projects within the floodway and/or 100-year floodplain will also be given while a City representative will be on hand to discuss how they are reviewing projects within the Floodplain Overlay District.

Published in: Design
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

FEMA Floodway and 100-year Floodplain: Impacts to New Building Construction or Renovation

  1. 1. Managing Development in the Flood Plain under the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) American Institute of Architects April 5, 2017
  2. 2. NFIP • Federal Program – 1968 • Administered Locally – 2450 in PA • Each state has a coordinator – PA Dept. of Community & Economic Development
  3. 3. Three Legged Stool • Maps – Identify Risk • Ordinances – Mitigate Risk • Insurance – Insure Against the Risk
  4. 4. MAPS
  5. 5. MAP SERVICE CENTER • FEMA Site – www.msc.fema.gov • Official site for flood plain determinations • Search by map panel, municipality or address • Effective, Historic or Preliminary Products
  6. 6. Flood Zones on the FIRMs Floodway Zone X Shaded Zone X Zone AE Zone A
  7. 7. Accessing FIRM and FIS Report Data  Map Service Center (MSC) – www.msc.fema.gov • PDF/hard copy format • NFHL Data download
  8. 8. The National Flood Hazard Layer (NFHL) • FEMA’s nationwide geospatial database of all digital effective FIRM data • Integrates FIRM data including LOMCs • Available in GIS format • FIRM and FIS are still the official source of data
  9. 9. ORDINANCES
  10. 10. STATE MODEL • Minimum Regulations • Suggested Provisions • Municipalities can and are encouraged to be more restrictive • www.dced.pa.gov
  11. 11. ADIMINISTRATION • Permits are Required - Development • All Necessary Permits – Coordination • Designation of Flood Plain Administrator • Elevation Data
  12. 12. ESSENTIAL PARTS • Permits Are Required for all development • The Floodplain consists of two very different areas – Floodway – Flood fringe
  13. 13. Technical Provisions Floodway vs. Flood Fringe PITTSBURGH, CITY OF RESERVE, TOWNSHIP OF 420068 S rrmv m pu n TrTm iSil PZtl "ITTTTT loiidi I-IOOU inyurdiicy proyrdin di i-yuu-tuy-bt^u. MAP SCALE 1" = 500' 0 500 1000 FEET METER? PANEL 0353H FIRM FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP ALLEGHENY COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA (ALL JURISDICTIONS) PANEL 353 OF 558 (SEE MAP INDEX FOR FIRM PANEL LAYOUT) CONTAINS: COMMUNITY NUMBER PANEL SUFFIX420063 0353 H Notice to User: The Map Number shown below should be used when placing map orders; the Community Number shown above should be used on insurance applications forthe subject community. MAP NUMBER 42003C0353H 93355=^ MAP REVISED " SEPTEMBER 26, 2014 Federal Emergency Management Agency This is an officialcopy of a portion of the above referencedfloodmap. It was extractedusing F-MIT On-Line. This map does not reflect changes or amendments which may have been made subsequent to the date on the title block. Forthe latestproduct informationabout National Flood Insurance Program flood maps check the FEMA Flood Map Store at www.msc.fema.gov
  14. 14. FLOODWAY • Floodway – Conveyance Area - No Build/Zero Rise Zone • Determination – 1 Foot Rise – 50 Feet from Top of Bank
  15. 15. FLOOD FRINGE • Flood Fringe – Storage Area – In accordance with Underlying Zone – New Construction, Substantial Damage/Improvement – Elevated to Base Flood Elevation – Residential – Lowest Floor vs. BFE, Design & Construction Standards – Elevated/Dry Flood Proofed – Non-residential
  16. 16. PERMITS ARE REQUIRED • All development in a participating municipality • Floodway – No Build Zone – Zero Rise Zone • Flood Fringe – In accordance with underlying zone – New Construction & Substantial Improvement/ Damage – Residential – Elevated to Base Flood Elevation – Non-residential Elevated/Flood Proofed
  17. 17. Application Review Who are the people typically responsible for reviewing permits? • Floodplain Administrator • Building Code Officer • Zoning Officer • Municipal Engineer • Third-party permitting/inspection company Coordination with other reviewers: • Is one person responsible for all aspects of floodplain development? • If not, are all parties aware of the floodplain requirements? • How is the permit application routed and either approved or denied?
  18. 18. • Vents are Maximum 12” above grade • When in the inspection process could this have been corrected? Foundation inspection • Air vents, not flood openings
  19. 19. Exercise: Inspections Review Most significant issues nationwide: •Insufficient venting – Insurance rating heavily impacted •Equipment not elevated – Expensive to replace •Propane tanks not secured – Become explosive projectiles AIR Photo Library
  20. 20. LOWEST FLOOR
  21. 21. LOWEST FLOOR CONT.
  22. 22. ENCLOSURES
  23. 23. FLOOD PROOFING
  24. 24. The Elevation Certificate (EC) • Administrative tool used to provide elevation information necessary to – Ensure compliance with community floodplain management ordinances – Determine the proper insurance premium rate – Support requests for certain Letters of Map Change
  25. 25. Reviewing an Elevation Certificate • Floodplain Administrators should review for accuracy • Incomplete form received? Send it back for revision • Considerations for EC Review – Lowest floor in comparison to BFE – Lowest floor in comparison to LAG and HAG – Building diagram – Mechanicals elevations – Openings requirement (engineered require certification) A surveyor’s mistake can lead to a very expensive insurance rate, and a less safe and non-compliant structure.
  26. 26. Issuance of Variances • Granting relief from ordinance requirements • Establish a process and an entity for applicants to request variances • Conditions of the property NOT the person • Notice of increase to risk and insurance premiums • Patterns of variances may result in sanctions Galveston, TX (FEMA photo library)
  27. 27. Evaluate the Merits of a Variance • General rule – Do not grant variances • Very specific conditions must be satisfied to justify a variance – Good and sufficient cause – Unique site conditions (personal considerations do not apply) – Hardship – must be exceptional – No threat to public safety – Minimum necessary to afford reliefThink carefully before granting a variance to build below the BFE. The property will be more likely to suffer damage and insurance will be costly. Communities with patterns of issuing variances may face sanctions – costing all property owners more!
  28. 28. CONTACTS DAN FITZPATRICK dafitzpatr@state.pa.us FRED CHAPMAN frchapman@state.pa.us 888-223-6837 www.newpa.com
  29. 29. 906.02-FP-O Flood Plain Overlay District – CITY OF PITTSBURGH
  30. 30. 30
  31. 31. 31
  32. 32. ALL Development Requires a Permit  Definition of development:  means any man-made change to improved or unimproved real estate, including but not limited to the construction, reconstruction, renovation, repair, expansion, or alteration of buildings or other structures; the placement of manufactured homes; streets, and other paving; utilities; filling, grading and excavation; mining; dredging; drilling operations; storage of equipment or materials; and the subdivision of land. ALL development in the SFHA requires a permit
  33. 33. 33 New Development/Substantial Improvement  New Development and Substantial Improvement in the Flood Plain: Zones A and AE (906.02.F.2)  Residential buildings: lowest floor, including basement, elevated to or above RFE (18”)  Non-residential buildings: elevated or floodproofed  New Development and Substantial Improvement in the Flood Way (906.02.E.2)  No increase in BFE for development within floodway  Substantial Improvement = reconstruction, rehab or renovation that equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value Existing Structures (906.02.H)
  34. 34. New Development/Substantial Improvement  New Development and Substantial Improvement in the Flood Plain: Zones A and AE (906.02.F.2)  Residential buildings: lowest floor, including basement, elevated to or above RFE  Non-residential buildings: elevated or floodproofed  New Development and Substantial Improvement in the Flood Way (906.02.E.2)  No increase in BFE for development within floodway  Substantial Improvement = reconstruction, rehab or renovation that equals or exceeds 50 percent of the market value Existing Structures (906.02.H)
  35. 35. Historic Structures (906.02.F.2(d))  Structure that is designated historic with the federal, state or local government, including those with a preliminary determination of contributing to historical significance of a district.  Floodproofing not required if:  Would cause structure to be removed from National Register or State Inventory of Historic Places.  Must provide documentation from the Secretary of the Interior or the State Historic Preservation Officer.  Exemption from code requirements would be minimum necessary to preserve historic character and design. Historic Structures (906.02.F.2(d))
  36. 36. Accessory Structures (906.02.F.2(e))  Accessory Structures = structures not designed for human habitation but for storage or parking related to the primary use. Floor area not to exceed 200 square feet.  Structure need not be floodproofed or elevated, as long as structure designed to meet other requirements of this section:  No sanitary facilities or fixed utility equipment such as furnaces.  Must be anchored and designed to allow for the entry and exit of floodwater to equalize hydrostatic forces.  Powerlines, wiring and outlets must be elevated. Accessory Structures (906.02.F.2(e))
  37. 37. Additional Provisions  Higher requirements for manufacture or storage of hazardous materials (906.02.F.4)  Special requirements for Subdivisions (906.02.F.5), Recreational Vehicles (906.02.F.7) and Manufactured Homes (906.02.F.6)  Special Permits are required for hospitals, nursing homes, and correctional facilities (906.02.G.2):  Evacuation Plan  Additional engineering analysis  Planning Commission approval required  State review required Additional Provisions
  38. 38. Additional Provisions  Visit our website http://pittsburghpa.gov/dcp/flood How to get started?
  39. 39. Fill out our editable application: http://apps.pittsburghpa.gov/dcp/Flood_Plain_Application.pdf
  40. 40. Attach: 1. Allegheny County Tax Assessment – Market Value 2. Professional Cost Estimate or Signed Contract
  41. 41. Submit: Josh Lippert, ASLA, CFM Senior Environmental Planner 412-255-2516 Joshua.lippert@pittsburghpa.gov Request a meeting: For new construction and/or substantial improvements in the floodplain you can request a meeting with our team. Joshua.lippert@pittsburghpa.gov

×